Wednesday, October 19, 2011

DR. ANTON PHIBES’ ABOMINABLY ERUDITE, MUSICALLY MALIGNANT, CURSEDLY CLEVER HALLOWEEN HORROR MOVIE QUIZ



If there were a holiday devoted to breaking traditions (violently and with malice and glee), it seems that Halloween would be a likely candidate. So it is in that spirit that we here at SLIFR University have stepped away from the usual school schedule of midterms and semester breaks to offer you this unique opportunity to shrug off the expectations surrounding this most terrifying of annual occasions. While others are out begging for candy, egging passing cars, bobbing for rotten apples or dressing like porn star versions of their favorite movie monsters and/or generic public servants and professionals, you could be inside, safely tucked away from the chilling gusts of wind that carry with them the unsettled spirits of the dead, hard at work on this first-ever Halloween-themed SLIFR quiz. And who better to inaugurate our Halloween fun than SLIFR U’s own renowned professor of musicology, the talented and rather single-minded Dr. Anton Phibes? Phibes joins our academic staff here after two rather successful seasons wreaking revenge upon the surgeons who caused his wife’s death (that’s his version of the story anyway) and those who would prevent him from obtaining the Egyptian scrolls of life necessary to secure her resurrection. Those grueling seasons were a good 90 years or so in the past, so after a long embalmed rest the stars have aligned in just the proper fashion to kick his clockwork resuscitation chamber into gear. The old tunesmith has had all the blood pumped back into his surprisingly resilient shell, which has allowed for his heralded arrival here on the SLIFR campus, where he’s ready for another great year of opening students’ eyes to the wonders of musical expression and concocting elaborate scenarios of vengeance and murder to visit upon those who slight him by daydreaming, snoozing in class or scoring less than 75% on his quarterly exams.

Asked to introduce his edition of the SLIFR quiz, Dr. Phibes was quick to sternly remind us that speech is still somewhat of an elaborate endeavor for him—even with the advances in audio technology that have occurred whilst he indulged in his truncated version of the Big Sleep, Phibes quaintly insists on using the same neck-connected Victrola he’s always employed for the occasional audible, halting expression of his most desperate desires and evil plots. (Ought to make his lectures a real hoot to listen to as well, wouldn’t you say?) Still, Phibes did offer a brief explanation to potential test-takers of his expectations as to their performance and what the test might hold in store for them. His terse statement, in its entirety, went a little something like this:

“You have only until the acid flows down to the end of this tube to complete this quiz! Do not dawdle or otherwise waste these precious moments, for if time runs out and the quiz goes incomplete, the acid, flowing surely, inexorably downward, will drip out onto your keyboard, and then your computer will have a face… like mine!”

It is, of course, up to you, Dear Student, to take or leave Dr. Phibes and his warnings with as much salt as you care to apply, while remembering, of course, his expert abilities in the handling of bloodthirsty bats, angry bees, swarming locusts, mean-spirited scorpions and the occasional brass unicorn launched from a great distance with pinpoint accuracy in order to fatally pin his adversaries to the wall like helpless butterflies. The staff at large will insist only upon the usual suggestions while taking the test here. We ask that you copy and paste your answers in the comments thread below, and to please make sure to copy the questions as well as the answers so readers might more easily determine to what questions you are referring with your answers. We also encourage lengthy or detailed answers in all instances—the longer the answer, the more entertaining and illuminating it (usually) is.


One last thing: in honor of Vincent Price, who once so vigorously and brilliantly portrayed the good doctor in two extremely amusing and creepy pictures in the early ‘70s, we’d like to call attention to a big event coming up here in Los Angeles the Sunday after next, October 30, at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. New film curator Elvis Mitchell is making a splash with his many new programs and series at the Bing Theater, none of which has me more excited than the Halloween Eve All-Day Vincent Price-a-Thon 100, in honor of the actor’s 100th birthday this year. LACMA will run six Price classics, starting with The Pit and the Pendulum and moving straight through The Masque of the Red Death, House of Wax, The Tingler and The Fly and culminating with a rare theatrical screening of The Witchfinder General, known here in the U.S. by the title The Conqueror Worm. Best of all, admission to the entire festival is free, so get there early!


Also, if seeing the actor on screen piques your interest in his second career as an art collector, you might be interested in being reminded of the recent reopening, also in commemoration of Price’s 100th birthday, of the Vincent Price Art Museum on the campus of East Los Angeles College. So do yourself a favor-- broaden your mind and slake your thirst for all things Vincent Price here in Los Angeles this Halloween at two of the city’s finest locations for the absorption of art. Your mind (or what will be left of it after six great horror movies) will thank you.

But now, we’ve got a test to take. Pick up your #2s and open up your Blue Books. Let the quizzing commence!

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1) Favorite Vincent Price/American International Pictures release.

2) What horror classic (or non-classic) that has not yet been remade would you like to see upgraded for modern audiences?

3) Jonathan Frid or Thayer David?

4) Name the one horror movie you need to see that has so far eluded you.

5) Favorite film director most closely associated with the horror genre.

6) Ingrid Pitt or Barbara Steele?

7) Favorite 50’s sci-fi/horror creature.

8) Favorite/best sequel to an established horror classic.

9) Name a sequel in a horror series which clearly signaled that the once-vital franchise had run out of gas.

10) John Carradine or Lon Chaney Jr.?

11) What was the last horror movie you saw in a theater? On DVD or Blu-ray?

12) Best foreign-language fiend/monster.

13) Favorite Mario Bava movie.

14) Favorite horror actor and actress.

15) Name a great horror director’s least effective movie.

16) Grayson Hall or Joan Bennett?

17) When did you realize that you were a fan of the horror genre? And if you’re not, when did you realize you weren’t?

18) Favorite Bert I. Gordon (B.I.G.) movie.

19) Name an obscure horror favorite that you wish more people knew about.

20) The Human Centipede-- yes or no?

21) And while we’re in the neighborhood, is there a horror film you can think of that you felt “went too far”?

22) Name a film that is technically outside the horror genre that you might still feel comfortable describing as a horror film.

23) Lara Parker or Kathryn Leigh Scott?

24) If you’re a horror fan, at some point in your past your dad, grandmother, teacher or some other disgusted figure of authority probably wagged her/his finger at you and said, “Why do you insist on reading/watching all this morbid monster/horror junk?” How did you reply? And if that reply fell short somehow, how would you have liked to have replied?

25) Name the critic or Web site you most enjoy reading on the subject of the horror genre.

26) Most frightening image you’ve ever taken away from a horror movie.

27) Your favorite memory associated with watching a horror movie.

28) What would you say is the most important/significant horror movie of the past 20 years (1992-2012)? Why?

29) Favorite Dr. Phibes curse (from either film).

30) You are programming an all-night Halloween horror-thon for your favorite old movie palace. What five movies make up your schedule?


**********************************************

69 comments:

Peter Nellhaus said...

1) Favorite Vincent Price/American International Pictures release.

Tomb of Ligiea

2) What horror classic (or non-classic) that has not yet been remade would you like to see upgraded for modern audiences?

I was hoping Jack Arnold would realize his remake of Creature from the Black Lagoon to include ecological themes.

3) Jonathan Frid or Thayer David?

Sorry, I never got into Dark Shadows.

4) Name the one horror movie you need to see that has so far eluded you.

She-wolf of London. Hey, did you know that June Lockhart is also in Zombie Hamlet?

5) Favorite film director most closely associated with the horror genre.

Dario Argento.

6) Ingrid Pitt or Barbara Steele?

I have to go with Steele, only because her films are so much more demented.

7) Favorite 50’s sci-fi/horror creature.

Not of this Earth.

8) Favorite/best sequel to an established horror classic.

Bride of Frankenstein

9) Name a sequel in a horror series which clearly signaled that the once-vital franchise had run out of gas.

I thought Hammer was getting desperate with Dracula A.D. 1972

10) John Carradine or Lon Chaney Jr.?

Carradine by dint of being part of the John Ford stock company.

11) What was the last horror movie you saw in a theater? On DVD or Blu-ray?

Amer on DVD. I think the last horror film I saw in a theater was Alone, the last Thai movie I saw in Thailand.

12) Best foreign-language fiend/monster.

Asami Yamazaki (Audition)

13) Favorite Mario Bava movie.

Kill, Baby, Kill!

14) Favorite horror actor and actress.

Dick Miller, Beverly Garland

15) Name a great horror director’s least effective movie.

Giallo was hardly worthy of the name.

Peter Nellhaus said...

16) Grayson Hall or Joan Bennett?

You're kidding. Joan Bennett was in Suspiria and made several films with Fritz Lang.

17) When did you realize that you were a fan of the horror genre? And if you’re not, when did you realize you weren’t?

Around the age of 10. Sneaking looks at horror movies on TV, and buying "Famous Monsters of Filmland".

18) Favorite Bert I. Gordon (B.I.G.) movie.

All things considered, The Magic Sword is a pretty good film.

19) Name an obscure horror favorite that you wish more people knew about.

I wish Alone had gotten a US DVD release. One of the best Thai horror movies.

20) The Human Centipede-- yes or no?

I've resisted so far.

21) And while we’re in the neighborhood, is there a horror film you can think of that you felt “went too far”?

I have a review coming up on the Hong Kong horror film, Dream Home. But for the most part, I liked it.

22) Name a film that is technically outside the horror genre that you might still feel comfortable describing as a horror film.

The recent Spanish movie, The Last Circus.

23) Lara Parker or Kathryn Leigh Scott?

Parker raced with the Devil.

24) If you’re a horror fan, at some point in your past your dad, grandmother, teacher or some other disgusted figure of authority probably wagged her/his finger at you and said, “Why do you insist on reading/watching all this morbid monster/horror junk?” How did you reply? And if that reply fell short somehow, how would you have liked to have replied?

Never happened. They might have been amused, but not disgusted.

25) Name the critic or Web site you most enjoy reading on the subject of the horror genre.

They know who they are.

26) Most frightening image you’ve ever taken away from a horror movie.

Not an image per se, but I did have a nightmare after I saw The Tenant.

27) Your favorite memory associated with watching a horror movie.

Exchanging jokes with my mom while we saw the original My Bloody Valentine. She had to review it for the Denver Post.

28) What would you say is the most important/significant horror movie of the past 20 years (1992-2012)? Why?

Park Chan-wook's Thirst. It brings up a lot of philosophical questions, plus lots of hot sex.

29) Favorite Dr. Phibes curse (from either film).

Aw, rats.

30) You are programming an all-night Halloween horror-thon for your favorite old movie palace. What five movies make up your schedule?

Vintage Corman - Not of this Earth, Attack of the Crab Monsters, The Undead, Wasp Woman and Creature from the Haunted Sea.

Steven Hart said...

1) Favorite Vincent Price/American International Pictures release.

The Abominable Dr. Pibes, r/u The Pit and the Pendulum.

2) What horror classic (or non-classic) that has not yet been remade would you like to see upgraded for modern audiences?

A Clockwork Orange

3) Jonathan Frid or Thayer David?

Thayer David, who had range.

4) Name the one horror movie you need to see that has so far eluded you.

Wendigo.

5) Favorite film director most closely associated with the horror genre.

Guillermo Del Toro.

6) Ingrid Pitt or Barbara Steele?

Barbara Steele. Even with that spiked mask hammered into her face.

7) Favorite 50’s sci-fi/horror creature.

Godzilla, Gojira, whatever nom de voyage he’s using at the moment. But only the first movie.

8) Favorite/best sequel to an established horror classic.

Aliens.

9) Name a sequel in a horror series which clearly signaled that the once-vital franchise had run out of gas.

Alien: Resurrection.

10) John Carradine or Lon Chaney Jr.?

John C.

11) What was the last horror movie you saw in a theater? On DVD or Blu-ray?

Theater: The War of the Worlds. DVD: The Orphanage.

12) Best foreign-language fiend/monster.

Because it was so pathetic: Reptilicus. Imagine a monster movie starring Kukla, Fran, and Ollie.

13) Favorite Mario Bava movie.

Black Sunday.

14) Favorite horror actor and actress.

Jeffrey Combs and Barbara Crampton.

15) Name a great horror director’s least effective movie.

The Mouse That Roared, Jack Arnold.

16) Grayson Hall or Joan Bennett?

Grayson Hall.

17) When did you realize that you were a fan of the horror genre? And if you’re not, when did you realize you weren’t?

There was never a time when I wasn't.

18) Favorite Bert I. Gordon (B.I.G.) movie.

Whatever last showed on MST3K.

19) Name an obscure horror favorite that you wish more people knew about.

20) The Human Centipede-- yes or no?

Yes, but only for Dieter Laser.

21) And while we’re in the neighborhood, is there a horror film you can think of that you felt “went too far”?

I absolutely hate the ending of "The Mist" for injecting such a dire, painful note into what had been a pretty cheesy movie. You gotta earn something like that.

22) Name a film that is technically outside the horror genre that you might still feel comfortable describing as a horror film.

Wide Sargasso Sea.

23) Lara Parker or Kathryn Leigh Scott?

Your bird.

24) If you’re a horror fan, at some point in your past your dad, grandmother, teacher or some other disgusted figure of authority probably wagged her/his finger at you and said, “Why do you insist on reading/watching all this morbid monster/horror junk?” How did you reply? And if that reply fell short somehow, how would you have liked to have replied?

25) Name the critic or Web site you most enjoy reading on the subject of the horror genre.

Ain’t It Cool News.

26) Most frightening image you’ve ever taken away from a horror movie.

As a young’un, the finale of Carnival of Souls, with the heroine being chased across the beach, then the daylight shot of the churned sand and the footprints coming to a sudden end. That one haunted my dreams.

27) Your favorite memory associated with watching a horror movie.

Cracking up with some friends at a screening of The Exorcist and getting outraged stares from the women in front of us. I still think it’s one of the most overrated movies ever made.

28) What would you say is the most important/significant horror movie of the past 20 years (1992-2012)? Why?

Guillermo del Toro, for his mastery of the high and low extremes of the genre.

29) Favorite Dr. Phibes curse (from either film).

That bit with the locusts and the honey. Yeeesh!

30) You are programming an all-night Halloween horror-thon for your favorite old movie palace. What five movies make up your schedule?

Tim Burton’s Corpse Bride, The Innocents, Dawn of the Dead (1978), The Thing (1982), Re-animator (1985).

Kevin Deany said...

Part One:

1) Favorite Vincent Price/American International Pictures release.

"The Abominable Dr. Phibes"

2) What horror classic (or non-classic) that has not yet been remade would you like to see upgraded for modern audiences?

"The Devil Rides Out"

3) Jonathan Frid or Thayer David?

Thayer David if only for "Journey to the Center of the Earth."

4) Name the one horror movie you need to see that has so far eluded you.

Any of the "Paranormal Activity" movies.

5) Favorite film director most closely associated with the horror genre.

Terence Fisher

6) Ingrid Pitt or Barbara Steele?

Barbara Steele

7) Favorite 50’s sci-fi/horror creature.

The Creature from the Black Lagoon

8) Favorite/best sequel to an established horror classic.

I wish I could be more original, but have to go with "Bride of Frankenstein"

9) Name a sequel in a horror series which clearly signaled that the once-vital franchise had run out of gas.

"Friday the 13th II"

10) John Carradine or Lon Chaney Jr.?

The Lonster

11) What was the last horror movie you saw in a theater? On DVD or Blu-ray?

Theater - the surprisignly good "Fright Night" remake

DVD - John Carpenter's "The Fog".

12) Best foreign-language fiend/monster.

Katia the witch in "Black Sunday"

13) Favorite Mario Bava movie.

"Black Sunday"

14) Favorite horror actor and actress.

Bela Lugosi and Sarah Michelle Gellar

15) Name a great horror director’s least effective movie.

"John Carpenter's Vampires"

Kevin Deany said...

Part Two:

16) Grayson Hall or Joan Bennett?

Joan Bennett, all the way.

17) When did you realize that you were a fan of the horror genre? And if you’re not, when did you realize you weren’t?

For as long as I can remember.

18) Favorite Bert I. Gordon (B.I.G.) movie.

Either of the Colossal Man movies.

19) Name an obscure horror favorite that you wish more people knew about.

An episode of "Thriller" called "The Incredible Doktor Markesan." One of the creepiest things I've ever seen.

20) The Human Centipede-- yes or no?

No!

21) And while we’re in the neighborhood, is there a horror film you can think of that you felt “went too far”?

The ending of "The Mist" infuriated me, and not in a good way.

22) Name a film that is technically outside the horror genre that you might still feel comfortable describing as a horror film.

"The Devil and Daniel Webster", also known as "All That Money Can Buy." One of the greatest movies ever made, with some incredible imagery.

23) Lara Parker or Kathryn Leigh Scott?

Lara Parker was also in "Race with the Devil", a personal favorite.

24) If you’re a horror fan, at some point in your past your dad, grandmother, teacher or some other disgusted figure of authority probably wagged her/his finger at you and said, “Why do you insist on reading/watching all this morbid monster/horror junk?” How did you reply? And if that reply fell short somehow, how would you have liked to have replied?

My parents never said that to me. If they did, I would say they stimulate the imagination.

25) Name the critic or Web site you most enjoy reading on the subject of the horror genre.

The Classic Horror Film Board

26) Most frightening image you’ve ever taken away from a horror movie.

The final scene in the aforementioned "The Incredible Doktor Markesan" haunted me for weeks.

27) Your favorite memory associated with watching a horror movie.

In the 1970s watching Creature Features on WGN-TV in Chicago on Saturday night. That's where I first saw the Universal classics.


28) What would you say is the most important/significant horror movie of the past 20 years (1992-2012)? Why?

The Japanese or American versions of "The Ring." How new technology can potentially harbor unforeseen horrors we can't begin to imagine.

29) Favorite Dr. Phibes curse (from either film).

The locusts from the first film.

30) You are programming an all-night Halloween horror-thon for your favorite old movie palace. What five movies make up your schedule?

"The Bride of Frankenstein"
"Black Sunday"
"Horror Hotel"
"House on Haunted Hill" (the original)
"The Incredible Doktor Markesan" episode of "Thriller"

Tony Dayoub said...

Dennis, since you always enjoy my stills, my answers are posted here.

Simon Abrams, bitch said...

1) 'Pit and the Pendulum,' I think.

2) 'Three on a Meathook.' Dead-serious.

3) Abstain.

4) The original 'The Fly' comes to mind.

5) David Cronenberg, he said unoriginally.

6) Barbara Steele, boyee.

7) The aliens from 'Invaders from Mars.'

8) 'Curse of the Cat People.'

9) Abstain

10) John Carradine

11) Theater: 'The Thing' prequel; On DVD: the original 'Don't Be Afraid of the Dark.'

12) Any of the ghosts in 'Kwaidan.'

13) 'The Girl Who Knew Too Much.'

14) Jeff Combs!

15) Haven't seen a couple but I'd say 'Starman' for Carpenter...sorry.

16) Joan Bennett

17) Probably the 'Scream' movies.

18) Abstain

19) 'Ravenous.'

20) Yes and fuck the haters.

21) Wise man say: "How do you define 'Overkill?' Just enough."

22) 'Jacob's Ladder.' Or maybe 'The Wall.'

23) Abstain

24) Don't remember.

25) Dunno.

26) Dunno.

27) Staring down the street after watching 'Night of the Living Dead,' just to make sure no one was coming.

28) Dunno.

29) Abstain

30) 'Ravenous,' 'In the Mouth of Madness,' 'Jacob's Ladder,' 'Don't Look Now' and 'The Beyond.'

Jaime Grijalba said...

1) Favorite Vincent Price/American International Pictures release.

The Abominable Dr. Phibes (1971)

2) What horror classic (or non-classic) that has not yet been remade would you like to see upgraded for modern audiences?

Who can Kill a Child? (1976)

3) Jonathan Frid or Thayer David?

Pass.

4) Name the one horror movie you need to see that has so far eluded you.

The Curse of Frankenstein (1957)

5) Favorite film director most closely associated with the horror genre.

James Whale

6) Ingrid Pitt or Barbara Steele?

Ingrid Pitt

7) Favorite 50’s sci-fi/horror creature.

8) Favorite/best sequel to an established horror classic.

Evil Dead II (1987)

9) Name a sequel in a horror series which clearly signaled that the once-vital franchise had run out of gas.

Scars of Dracula (1970)

10) John Carradine or Lon Chaney Jr.?

Lon Chaney Jr.

11) What was the last horror movie you saw in a theater? On DVD or Blu-ray?

Theater: Drag Me to Hell (2009) (it's been a while)
DVD: Theater of Blood (!973)

12) Best foreign-language fiend/monster.

Godzilla.

13) Favorite Mario Bava movie.

Of the two I've seen: "Black Sabbath" (1963)

14) Favorite horror actor and actress.

Actor: Vincent Price
Actress: Jamie Lee Curtis

Jaime Grijalba said...

15) Name a great horror director’s least effective movie.

Monkey Shines (1988), but it's still fun.

16) Grayson Hall or Joan Bennett?

Joan Bennett

17) When did you realize that you were a fan of the horror genre? And if you’re not, when did you realize you weren’t?

I don't know, it happened suddenly, I used to hate the genre, and then I liked it, I'm not really sure what it was.

18) Favorite Bert I. Gordon (B.I.G.) movie.

I've just seen "The Cyclops" (1957)

19) Name an obscure horror favorite that you wish more people knew about.

Eating Raoul (1982), I never see it that mentioned in horror discussions.

20) The Human Centipede-- yes or no?

Yes, but I haven't seen it.

21) And while we’re in the neighborhood, is there a horror film you can think of that you felt “went too far”?

There are some gruesome films, gory and all, but nothing that really has made me sick or that it's too much. Haven't seen "A Serbian Film" (2010), though...

22) Name a film that is technically outside the horror genre that you might still feel comfortable describing as a horror film.

"A Clockwork Orange" (1971)

23) Lara Parker or Kathryn Leigh Scott?

Pass

24) If you’re a horror fan, at some point in your past your dad, grandmother, teacher or some other disgusted figure of authority probably wagged her/his finger at you and said, “Why do you insist on reading/watching all this morbid monster/horror junk?” How did you reply? And if that reply fell short somehow, how would you have liked to have replied?

My dad always bugs me about the gory films, but he also has no disgust in seeing them, he just annoys me because he wants to. Hahaha.

25) Name the critic or Web site you most enjoy reading on the subject of the horror genre.

Arbogast on Film.

26) Most frightening image you’ve ever taken away from a horror movie.

The face of Megan in "The Exorcist" (1973)

27) Your favorite memory associated with watching a horror movie.

Not a specific memory, but I remember being so scared of Chucky covers at the video store for no reason, because I hand't seen the film itself.

28) What would you say is the most important/significant horror movie of the past 20 years (1992-2012)? Why?

I'd say "Scream" (1998), but it's not my favorite.

29) Favorite Dr. Phibes curse (from either film).

"Beasts". Golden unicorn head to the chest. The most unplausible and funniest.

30) You are programming an all-night Halloween horror-thon for your favorite old movie palace. What five movies make up your schedule?

"The Evil Dead" (1981)
"Housemaid" (1960)
"The Devils" (1971)
"Onibaba" (1964)
"Silent Hill" (2006)

Ivan G. Shreve, Jr. said...

Mine's up here...

Ryan H. said...

1) Favorite Vincent Price/American International Pictures release.

THE TOMB OF LIGEIA/THE ABOMINABLE DR. PHIBES.


2) What horror classic (or non-classic) that has not yet been remade would you like to see upgraded for modern audiences?

THE DEVIL RIDES OUT.


3) Jonathan Frid or Thayer David?

Jonathan Frid.


4) Name the one horror movie you need to see that has so far eluded you.

THE HAUNTED PALACE.


5) Favorite film director most closely associated with the horror genre.

Roman Polanski.


6) Ingrid Pitt or Barbara Steele?

Barbara Steele.


7) Favorite 50’s sci-fi/horror creature.

The Creature from THE CREATURE FROM THE BLACK LAGOON. No question.


8) Favorite/best sequel to an established horror classic.

Hm. I'm tempted to say DR. PHIBES RISES AGAIN! But I will instead go with BRIDE OF FRANKENSTEIN.


9) Name a sequel in a horror series which clearly signaled that the once-vital franchise had run out of gas.

HALLOWEEN 4: THE RETURN OF MICHAEL MYERS.


10) John Carradine or Lon Chaney Jr.?

Lon Chaney Jr.


11) What was the last horror movie you saw in a theater? On DVD or Blu-ray?

In the theater? Hm. THE HAUNTING, I believe (the original, not the remake). On DVD/Blu-Ray it was INSIDIOUS.


12) Best foreign-language fiend/monster.

Kinski's Dracula in the German-language version of Herzog's NOSFERATU.


13) Favorite Mario Bava movie.

BLACK SABBATH.


14) Favorite horror actor and actress.

Vincent Price, for certain. Not sure about which actress.


15) Name a great horror director’s least effective movie.

Dario Argento: THE PHANTOM OF THE OPERA.

Ryan H. said...

16) Grayson Hall or Joan Bennett?

Joan Bennett.


17) When did you realize that you were a fan of the horror genre? And if you’re not, when did you realize you weren’t?

I can't remember a time when I didn't know that I liked horror and the macabre. When I was a child, I tended to pretend to be the villain, and not the hero. That was a tip-off.


18) Favorite Bert I. Gordon (B.I.G.) movie.

Never seen one all the way through. Alas.


19) Name an obscure horror favorite that you wish more people knew about.

THE SKULL. Or THE GORGON. The Hammer/Amicus string of films released a bunch of films that are still relatively obscure to those who aren't already fans of those studios.


20) The Human Centipede-- yes or no?

No.


21) And while we’re in the neighborhood, is there a horror film you can think of that you felt “went too far”?

HOSTEL.


22) Name a film that is technically outside the horror genre that you might still feel comfortable describing as a horror film.

APOCALYPSE NOW. Or Polanski's THE TRAGEDY OF MACBETH.


23) Lara Parker or Kathryn Leigh Scott?

Kathryn Leigh Scott.


24) If you’re a horror fan, at some point in your past your dad, grandmother, teacher or some other disgusted figure of authority probably wagged her/his finger at you and said, “Why do you insist on reading/watching all this morbid monster/horror junk?” How did you reply? And if that reply fell short somehow, how would you have liked to have replied?

I suggested that it's important to confront and overcome our nightmares.


25) Name the critic or Web site you most enjoy reading on the subject of the horror genre.

Gary Morris.


26) Most frightening image you’ve ever taken away from a horror movie.

A man being buried alive in a mill in VAMPYR.


27) Your favorite memory associated with watching a horror movie.

Sitting on the couch with my mother watching an AMC movie marathon of old Vincent Price features.


28) What would you say is the most important/significant horror movie of the past 20 years (1992-2012)? Why?

SCREAM, for its postmodern approach to horror. But I don't like it much. Truth be told, I haven't seen a horror film from the last twenty years that I truly loved.


29) Favorite Dr. Phibes curse (from either film).

Oh, I'm quite partial to Phibes' marvelously malevolent frog-mask kill from ABOMINABLE DR. PHIBES.


30) You are programming an all-night Halloween horror-thon for your favorite old movie palace. What five movies make up your schedule?


THE MASQUE OF THE RED DEATH
THE TOMB OF LIGEIA
THE ABOMINABLE DR. PHIBES
DR. PHIBES RISES AGAIN!
THE HAUNTING

Or, alternately:

HALLOWEEN
THE OMEN
THE DEVIL RIDES OUT
THE NINTH GATE
THE SHINING

dave s said...

Yay! A Halloween quiz. Part I:

Q1) Favorite Vincent Price/American International Pictures release.
A1) The Masque of the Red Death (though Theatre of Blood feels like one, and that would be my choice is it weren’t a United Artists release).

Q2) What horror classic (or non-classic) that has not yet been remade would you like to see upgraded for modern audiences?
A2) The TV movie version of Stephen’ King’s It!. I would love to see it as a 90-minute black & white theatrical release, rethought to be less silly. The book scared me (despite some nutty sections), but the TV movie missed the mark for me.

Q3) Jonathan Frid or Thayer David?
A3) Frid.

Q4) Name the one horror movie you need to see that has so far eluded you.
A4) There’s more than one, but I’ve recently become a bit obsessed with seeing The Man Who Laughed, so that’s my answer, though I also really want to see Goke, Body Snatcher from Hell.

Q5) Favorite film director most closely associated with the horror genre.
A5) George A. Romero.

Q6) Ingrid Pitt or Barbara Steele?
A6) Both are fantastic, but I’ll go with Pitt.

Q7) Favorite 50’s sci-fi/horror creature.
A7) Godzilla!

Q8) Favorite/best sequel to an established horror classic.
A8) Dawn of the Dead (’78).

Q9) Name a sequel in a horror series which clearly signaled that the once-vital franchise had run out of gas.
A9) Saw 2.

Q10) John Carradine or Lon Chaney Jr.?
A10) These comparison questions are killing me. It’s like asking a child to pick Mom or Dad… but I’ve always had a soft spot for Lon Jr.

Q11) What was the last horror movie you saw in a theater? On DVD or Blu-ray?
A11) Theatre: The Thing (2011); DVD: The Wolfman (1941).

Q12) Best foreign-language fiend/monster.
A12) Godzilla!

Q13) Favorite Mario Bava movie.
A13) Bay of Blood.

Q14) Favorite horror actor and actress.
A14) Boris Karloff & Ingrid Pitt.

Q15) Name a great horror director’s least effective movie.
A15) Peter Sadsy’s The Devil Within Her.

dave s said...

Part II:

Q16) Grayson Hall or Joan Bennett?
A16) Hall was in Night Gallery and Gargoyles, but Bennett was in Suspiria. Argento trumps here.

Q17) When did you realize that you were a fan of the horror genre? And if you’re not, when did you realize you weren’t?
A17) When I was three-years old, watching The Deadly Mantis while having to sit on the back part of my family’s couch because I was scared a mantis would grab my feet from under it.

Q18) Favorite Bert I. Gordon (B.I.G.) movie.
A18) Food of the Gods.

Q19) Name an obscure horror favorite that you wish more people knew about.
A19) Hands of the Ripper.

Q20) The Human Centipede-- yes or no?
A20) Yes, only because I was surprised that Tom Six could successfully spread this premise out for 90 minutes, because its an obscenely original idea, and because I cared about what happened to its two female leads.

Q21) And while we’re in the neighborhood, is there a horror film you can think of that you felt “went too far”?
A12) Cannibal Holocaust with its real animal killings (and I say this as a fan of the flick). There are others that do the same, but Cannibal Holocaust is probably the most infamous example.

Q22) Name a film that is technically outside the horror genre that you might still feel comfortable describing as a horror film.
A22) Shadow of a Doubt.

Q23) Lara Parker or Kathryn Leigh Scott?
A23) Race With the Devil!
Q24) If you’re a horror fan, at some point in your past your dad, grandmother, teacher or some other disgusted figure of authority probably wagged her/his finger at you and said, “Why do you insist on reading/watching all this morbid monster/horror junk?” How did you reply? And if that reply fell short somehow, how would you have liked to have replied?
A24) As a lifelong horror fan, I used to be asked this constantly, though no one example stands out. Typically I’d reply with something insightful like, “I dunno, I just like them.” Now what I say is, “Horror is a metaphor and it connects with imaginative and empathetic people.” Watching David Cronenberg movies helped me formulate this opinion.

Q25) Name the critic or Web site you most enjoy reading on the subject of the horror genre.
A25) www.CoolAssCinema.com.

Q26) Most frightening image you’ve ever taken away from a horror movie.
A26) Béatrice Dalle chomping away at a tied-to-the-bed teen in Trouble Every Day.

Q27) Your favorite memory associated with watching a horror movie.
A27) The Exorcist. The story is here:
http://bloody-terror.blogspot.com/2011/05/kinder-trauma-exorcist.html

Q28) What would you say is the most important/significant horror movie of the past 20 years (1992-2012)? Why?
A28) I’ll go with Saw, though Hostel was a close second. While I’m not a particular fan of either movie (I do love Hostel 2, however), I think they both reflect the western world’s unease over the last 10 years in particular, so they represent era.

Q29) Favorite Dr. Phibes curse (from either film).
A29) Locusts!

Q30) You are programming an all-night Halloween horror-thon for your favorite old movie palace. What five movies make up your schedule?
A30) The Tingler, Zombie, I Drink Your Blood, The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (’74) & Hammer’s Twins of Evil.

Anonymous said...

1) Masque of the Red Death for all its surrealism and darkly poetic ending. Not to mention Paul McCartney's old girlfriend Jane Asher!

2). I think "Them" could benefit from the digital age. Plus think of the commercial possibilities -- that's a video game I'd love to play!!

3). I have no more than dim memories of Dark Shadows as a kid. Someday I'd like to check it out again.

4). I've never seen the original "Last House on the Left" but it hasn't so much eluded me as I've been hesitant to see it based on its reputation.

5). George A. Romero

6). Ingrid Pitt

7). The Creature from the Black Lagoon

8). The Bride of Frankenstien (the "Godfather 2" of horror!)

9). Poltergiest 2 (and it just got worse from there)

10). Lon Chaney Jr (because I have to take his father into consideration)

11). The Midnight Movies double feature of the Count Yorga films (terribly under-rated in my opinion!)

12). The eye-handed creature in Pan's Labrynth

13). Black Sabbath

14).Boris Karloff (sorry Vincent! I'll get the acid for this, I'm sure!) & Ingrid Pitt


15). John Carpenter's "Ghost of Mars"

16). See #3

17). At about age 5 watching "Creature Feature" Saturday afternoons on channel 56

18). Earth vs. the Spider

19). The two Count Yorga films!

20). I'll pass.

21). "The Hills Have Eyes".

22). Dragonwyck

23). Someone's a big Dark Shadows fan!

24). I hid many a rental from my Mom. I guess I would have said, "I just like watching it I don't want to do those things!"

25). I find horror hosts fascinating and there's a site called "Horror Host Graveyard" that I love.

26). Jack Nicholson's face in "The Shining" (any number of shots)

27). Having my girlfriend and her best friend BOTH cuddled up to me in the dark for "Night of the Living Dead." Thank you Mr. Romero!

28). I'd say "Candyman" for it's "unsafe feeling racial guilt" quality.

29). The locust curse!

30) . "The Body Snatcher" (Val Lewton), "Bride of Frankenstien", "The Black Cat" (Lugosi/Karloff), "The House on Haunted Hill", "Creature from the Black Lagoon".

Richard Harland Smith said...

I've spent half an hour trying to post my answers. I give up. Happy Halloween!

Adam Ross said...

1) Favorite Vincent Price/American International Pictures release.

TOMB OF LIGEIA ("Then let the Lord refuse her!")

2) What horror classic (or non-classic) that has not yet been remade would you like to see upgraded for modern audiences?

Since we're apparently getting a new "Twilight Zone" movie, why not give the same treatment to "Night Gallery"?

3) Jonathan Frid or Thayer David?

I'm not a "Dark Shadows" fan, but I do like THE EIGER SANCTION, so I'll go with David.

4) Name the one horror movie you need to see that has so far eluded you.

Never seen any of the NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET movies, though I did have the comic book of FREDDY'S DEAD.

5) Favorite film director most closely associated with the horror genre.

Mario Bava

6) Ingrid Pitt or Barbara Steele?

Barbara Steele

7) Favorite 50’s sci-fi/horror creature.

The titular creature from IT! THE TERROR FROM BEYOND SPACE.

8) Favorite/best sequel to an established horror classic.

Lot of choices here, I'll go with the alarming ambition and occasionally breathless execution of HELLRAISER II.

9) Name a sequel in a horror series which clearly signaled that the once-vital franchise had run out of gas.

THE HOWLING III: THE MARSUPIALS

10) John Carradine or Lon Chaney Jr.?

John Carradine. Lon Chaney Jr never scared me.

11) What was the last horror movie you saw in a theater? On DVD or Blu-ray?

SALO OR THE 120 DAYS OF SODOM

12) Best foreign-language fiend/monster.

Klaus Kinski

13) Favorite Mario Bava movie.

KILL, BABY ... KILL!

14) Favorite horror actor and actress.

Peter Cushing and

15) Name a great horror director’s least effective movie.

I know some people are fond of it, but John Carpenter's IN THE MOUTH OF MADNESS was just too silly.

16) Grayson Hall or Joan Bennett?

I love Bennett in SUSPIRIA.

17) When did you realize that you were a fan of the horror genre? And if you’re not, when did you realize you weren’t?

When I started watching the classics and originals, and started understanding the history of it all.

18) Favorite Bert I. Gordon (B.I.G.) movie.

Amazingly, the only one I've seen in THE WITCHING, and it did have its moments.

19) Name an obscure horror favorite that you wish more people knew about.

I would rank Argento's TENEBRE among my favorite horror movies, and it is far superior to the American slasher movies that came out at the same time, yet still doesn't get much attention even among the director's fans.

Adam Ross said...

20) The Human Centipede-- yes or no?

I've been able to resist it thus far.

21) And while we’re in the neighborhood, is there a horror film you can think of that you felt “went too far”?

I'm not a fan of LAST HOUSE ON THE LEFT at all, and found nothing redeeming in any of it.

22) Name a film that is technically outside the horror genre that you might still feel comfortable describing as a horror film.

BLUE VELVET

23) Lara Parker or Kathryn Leigh Scott?

Scott was in "Tales of the Gold Monkey" AND "Police Squad!"

24) If you’re a horror fan, at some point in your past your dad, grandmother, teacher or some other disgusted figure of authority probably wagged her/his finger at you and said, “Why do you insist on reading/watching all this morbid monster/horror junk?” How did you reply? And if that reply fell short somehow, how would you have liked to have replied?

Sometimes I'm not even sure I know the answer.

25) Name the critic or Web site you most enjoy reading on the subject of the horror genre.

I always look forward to the opinions of Tim Lucas and his staff at Video Watchdog.

26) Most frightening image you’ve ever taken away from a horror movie.

The early night scene in THE LEOPARD MAN when we see the young girl spotting the big cat's eyes reflecting in the darkness, and in the next shot realizing they've disappeared.

27) Your favorite memory associated with watching a horror movie.

The level of genuine terror I experienced as a young child watching the remake of INVADERS FROM MARS, the idea of not being able to trust your parents was something that really struck me.

28) What would you say is the most important/significant horror movie of the past 20 years (1992-2012)? Why?

Tough question, without thinking about it all night I'll go with PAN'S LABYRINTH, for showing there's still a place for imaginative horror/fantasy movies.

29) Favorite Dr. Phibes curse (from either film).

Sorry, yet to see either.
For some reason it wasn't letting me put all of this in one reply.



30) You are programming an all-night Halloween horror-thon for your favorite old movie palace. What five movies make up your schedule?

HORROR OF DRACULA
SCREAM
THE MASK OF SATAN
TOMBS OF THE BLIND DEAD
HALLOWEEN

Luis Alonso Orellana said...

1) Witchfinder General

2) I Walked with a Zombie

3) Thayer David

4) The Haunting (1963)

5) John Carpenter

6) Barbara Steele

7) Gojira aka Godzilla

8) A Nightmare on Elm Street 3: Dream Warriors

9) Hellraiser IV: Bloodline

10) John Carradine

11) A Serbian Film in theatres. Jesse James Meets Frankenstein's Daughter on DVD.

12) The creature from The Host

13) Lisa and the Devil

14) Boris Karloff & Adrienne Barbeau

15) Dario Argento's The Phantom of the Opera

16) Joan Bennett

17) I knew I was a fan of horror movies when I was a kid when they kept scaring me, but also fascinated by them.

18) I haven't seen one yet.

19) Don't Torture A Duckling

20) Yes

21) No

22) The Terminator

23) Lara Parker

24) My parents were cool. I don't recall anyone giving me a hard time about watching horror films. If anything, they would explain to me how they couldn't watch them. But they wouldn't tell me not to watch it.

25) There really is no one place that I depend on.

26) The first appearance of Leatherface in Texas Chain Saw Massacre and the shot through the door in Dario Argento's Opera come to mind.

27) Being scared while watching a horror film at night when I was home alone as a child.

28) Drag Me to Hell. Because it had been a while since I had seen a horror film like this in a theatre that wasn't 28 Days Later.

29) Frogs.

30) Dressed to Kill (1980), The Changeling (1980), Opera (1987), Rabid Dogs (1974) & Deranged (1974).

lrobhubbard said...

1) Favorite Vincent Price/American International Pictures release.

I like them all, but MASQUE OF THE RED DEATH is probably the pinnacle achievement.

2) What horror classic (or non-classic) that has not yet been remade would you like to see upgraded for modern audiences?

Having just watched THE LEGEND OF HILLBILLY JOHN, I would really like to see someone take another crack at adapting some more of Manly Wade Wellman's Silver John stories -- I sort of envision it like the old THE WALTONS series, but with a much darker supernatural edge.

I could also see someone doing NIGHT OF THE LEPUS again, but as an intentional comedy this time around... it'd be perfect for The SyFy Channel.

3) Jonathan Frid or Thayer David?

Jonathan Frid. I still have vague memories of watching DARK SHADOWS with my aunt after she got home from school.

4) Name the one horror movie you need to see that has so far eluded you.

"Need" to see? I've yet to watch LAST HOUSE ON THE LEFT, but I don't feel at this point in my life that there's any real need to see it - or any early Wes Craven for that fact.

5) Favorite film director most closely associated with the horror genre.

John Carpenter

6) Ingrid Pitt or Barbara Steele?

Tough - Barbara had the look, but Ingrid would go topless when necessary...

7) Favorite 50’s sci-fi/horror creature.

The Metalunan Mutant from THIS ISLAND EARTH

8) Favorite/best sequel to an established horror classic.

TEXAS CHAINSAW 2 - it's sloppy, but I like my satire messy...

9) Name a sequel in a horror series which clearly signaled that the once-vital franchise had run out of gas.

Not a big fan of franchise horror - it's usually tired out after the third bite of the apple.

10) John Carradine or Lon Chaney Jr.?

John Carradine

11) What was the last horror movie you saw in a theater? On DVD or Blu-ray?

Theater - DON'T BE AFRAID OF THE DARK.
DVD - BLOOD CAR

12) Best foreign-language fiend/monster.

The Lizard King - GODZILLA!!

13) Favorite Mario Bava movie.

I'm relatively new to Bava; heard about him for years, but never got to see any of his films until this past decade and became a fan when the Anchor Bay box sets became available.

LISA AND THE DEVIL/THE GIRL WHO KNEW TOO MUCH (Italian cut)

14) Favorite horror actor and actress.

Vincent Price and Alice Krige

15) Name a great horror director’s least effective movie.

I wouldn't call Wes Craven 'great', but DEADLY FRIEND certainly qualifies as 'least effective'...

Robert Fiore said...

1) Favorite Vincent Price/American International Pictures release.

Though it is not a good movie at all, Comedy of Terrors has a special place in my personal mythology. Vincent Price is a sinister undertaker and a very sad and dissolute Peter Lorre plays his henchman. There's a running gag wherein Lorre is constantly asking for the chance to build a coffin and Price constantly refuses. Finally while preoccupied with other issues Price relents. Lorre puts together a rattletrap contraption that looks like an orange crate constructed by a blind man. He steps back to admire his handiwork and says a line I always remembered as, "Any man would be proud to be buried in that coffin!" (I saw the movie again and that's not actually how it goes.) Anyway, from that day to this, whenever I do a half-ass job that's going to have to do because I don't have time to do anything more, I look at it and say to myself in my best Peter Lorre voice, "Any man would be proud to be buried in that coffin!"

2) What horror classic (or non-classic) that has not yet been remade would you like to see upgraded for modern audiences?

I didn't think the Tyrone Power version of Nightmare Alley did the novel justice at all, and I've always thought the book was a classic of psychological horror waiting to happen. They're always talking about remaking it, aren't they?

3) Jonathan Frid or Thayer David?

Jonathan Frid is America's id, David comma Thayer does not have a prayer. Having been a child in the 60s (as opposed to a child of the 60s, who are now in their 60s), I watched Dark Shadows in its first run, beginning shortly before the Quentin Collins storyline, which I found as scary as anything I ever saw on film, or tape. The "Here Comes Quentin" theme was even in the Top 40 for a while. My dad saw a couple of episodes when he was home sick from work one summer and got a real kick out of it. He called it "Guys and Ghouls."

4) Name the one horror movie you need to see that has so far eluded you.

I'm still waiting for the chance to see Kwaidan on a big screen first. I almost saw it once, but it was a totally crapped-out print with the color faded to hell, and as I understood the use of color is a major part of the film I just walked out.

5) Favorite film director most closely associated with the horror genre.

Orson Welles, but he was associated with horror mostly on radio.

7) Favorite 50’s sci-fi/horror creature.

Well, the Creature from the Black Lagoon, you'll be seeing him again real soon. When his last intended did the dirty on him, didn't last five minutes in the swim.

8) Favorite/best sequel to an established horror classic.

Could it be anything but Bride of Frankenstein?

9) Name a sequel in a horror series which clearly signaled that the once-vital franchise had run out of gas.

Ghostbusters 2.

10) John Carradine or Lon Chaney Jr.?

John Carradine was a treasure, Lon Chaney, Jr. inherited a better actor's name, and histrionic talents rather short of those of Mike Mazurki.

Robert Fiore said...

11) What was the last horror movie you saw in a theater? On DVD or Blu-ray?

In the theater, High Plains Drifter (I went to a western and a ghost story broke out). On Blu-Ray House, which I found silly and tedious, and I couldn't figure out which one was Hugh Laurie.

12) Best foreign-language fiend/monster.

Hitler.

14) Favorite horror actor and actress.

Actor, Peter Lorre, but he would have preferred not to be a horror actor. Actress, Diana Rigg in Theater of Blood, with an honorable mention to the young lady who played Britt Eklund's backside in The Wicker Man.

17) When did you realize that you were a fan of the horror genre? And if you’re not, when did you realize you weren’t?

I am to horror like the nominal Christian who only goes to church on Christmas and Easter, in that the only time I'll really pay any attention to the genre is at Halloween. First, foremost and above all else I am a comedy guy, and after that an action guy, and after that a crime/thriller guy, and after that a musicals guy, and after that a science fiction guy, and a horror guy hardly at all. When I do turn my attention to the genre I find that the movies are far from the best medium for it. To me the best medium for horror is old time radio, the second best is the short story, and you get a bit of both with a good dramatic reading of a horror story. For a prime example, Google "David McCallum" and "The Rats in the Walls" and you will be able to download something to your advantage.

20) The Human Centipede-- yes or no?

That's not a movie, it's a confidence trick. To speak of it is to fall for it.

21) And while we’re in the neighborhood, is there a horror film you can think of that you felt “went too far”?

If the question is what horror films I find most distasteful, I would say the ones where people are compelled to mutilate themselves, but this is purely theoretical because I've never actually seen one. I have no objection to other people watching them, though I have an opinion about it. Going too far would be actually harming people in the making of the film, as opposed to just having actors pretending.

22) Name a film that is technically outside the horror genre that you might still feel comfortable describing as a horror film.

I just saw the original Straw Dogs for the first time, and that might fill the bill. What an extraordinary piece of cinema. I knew it mostly by reputation, and its reputation is fixed around politicized positions that obscure the moral complexity of what's actually in the film. To put it in the same category as revenge movies of the Death Wish ilk is to completely misconstrue its subject, which is the breakdown of civilization and regression to atavistic states. Take the rape sequence, which was condemned as suggesting that women enjoy rape. What actually happens is the mathematician's wife, who is of the upper class in this rural English town, had a fling with a local layabout before marrying back into her class, and is still sexually attracted to him. While the husband has been lured away the she and the layabout have what amounts to rough sex; to the extent that she refuses she is saying "no, I can't" rather than "no, I don't want to." When he is done, one of the layabout's comrades wants to have a go, too. Now at this point the layabout can either defend the woman or he can abide by the atavistic rules of his clan that the spoils should be shared, and rather than risk ostracism he helps his cohort rape the woman. Straw Dogs is to The Wild Bunch what Peeping Tom is to Psycho -- a movie that can never be embraced by a broad audience in the same way because its implications are too disturbing.

Robert Fiore said...

24) If you’re a horror fan, at some point in your past your dad, grandmother, teacher or some other disgusted figure of authority probably wagged her/his finger at you and said, “Why do you insist on reading/watching all this morbid monster/horror junk?” How did you reply? And if that reply fell short somehow, how would you have liked to have replied?

My family was not particularly censorious, but then, I'm not particularly a horror fan.

25) Name the critic or Web site you most enjoy reading on the subject of the horror genre.

Always fishing, aren't you? Always fishing.

26) Most frightening image you’ve ever taken away from a horror movie.

In a movie either the chest burster or the face hugger. But really my most frightening horror image came from one of a series of anthologies they used to have under Alfred Hitchcock's name, "Alfred Hitchcock Presents Stories that Scared Even Me" (actually edited by Thomas M. Disch). There was a story in it called The Troll, in which the creature of the title is described sucking the vital fluids from his victim as if he were sucking the juice out of an orange. This unnerved me so much (I was a kid at the time) that I slammed the book shut and never opened it again. It was only years later that I ran across the story and found out who wrote it -- T. H. White, of all people.

27) Your favorite memory associated with watching a horror movie.

Going to the first run of Alien at the Egyptian Theater where they had original props from the movie on display in the courtyard and lobby. In general, watching Larry "Seymour" Vincent trash the awful movies he used to host on Channel 9's Fright Night.

28) What would you say is the most important/significant horror movie of the past 20 years (1992-2012)? Why?

28 Days Later was the booster rocket that made zombies the Official Horror Subject of all the world, wasn't it?

29) Favorite Dr. Phibes curse (from either film).

"God dammit, I haven't seen either of these films yet!"

Vincent Price was once on a TV talk show where the host mentioned that his next picture would be Dr. Phibes Rises Again, and Price answered, "Yes, and if the people keep coming he'll rise again and again and again . . ."

30) You are programming an all-night Halloween horror-thon for your favorite old movie palace. What five movies make up your schedule?

If it's me you're asking you'd be better off asking me what five old radio shows I'd have on my radio horror-thon. Number one without a doubt, Lucille Fletcher's "The Hitch-Hiker" from Suspense (starring Orson Welles), then "Three Skeleton Key" and "Evening Primrose" from Escape, then "The Thing on the Fourble Board" from Quiet Please, then Orson Welles' Mercury Theater version of Dracula. All are no doubt online somewhere.

Neil said...

1) Favorite Vincent Price/American International Pictures release. Witchfinder General

2) What horror classic (or non-classic) that has not yet been remade would you like to see upgraded for modern audiences? Lamberto Bava’s 1985 film Demons had a great idea but was poorly executed and is ripe for a remake. Likewise 1982’s Halloween III: Season of the Witch has some great elements, and I like the film a lot, it just could be so much better.

3) Jonathan Frid or Thayer David? Pass

4) Name the one horror movie you need to see that has so far eluded you. I really can’t think of one. Many years ago there were many horror films that were simply unavailable to me mainly due to previous decade’s stricter censorship here in the UK. I was dying to see the second Texas Chainsaw Massacre film ever since it came out in 1986, and didn’t see a fully uncut version until about 2000.

5) Favorite film director most closely associated with the horror genre. Does Dario Argento count? Most of his movies are giallos, which aren’t strictly horror films, although Suspiria is his most well-known film. If he doesn’t count then John Carpenter or David Cronenberg.

6) Ingrid Pitt or Barbara Steele? Barbara Steele

7) Favorite 50’s sci-fi/horror creature. Pass

8) Favorite/best sequel to an established horror classic. Argento’s Inferno, or Damien: Omen II

9) Name a sequel in a horror series which clearly signaled that the once-vital franchise had run out of gas. The Final Conflict?

10) John Carradine or Lon Chaney Jr.? John Carradine

11) What was the last horror movie you saw in a theater? On DVD or Blu-ray? Theatre: Scream 4. Blu-ray: Argento’s Phenomena

12) Best foreign-language fiend/monster. Sadako (Ring)

13) Favorite Mario Bava movie. Blood and Black Lace

14) Favorite horror actor and actress. Vincent Price & Jamie Lee Curtis

15) Name a great horror director’s least effective movie. Wes Craven’s made a few turkeys, such as Shocker and Deadly Friend. And if Argento does count, I refuse to believe that the man who directed The Bird with the Crystal Plumage, Suspiria and Tenebrae was responsible for films like Mother of Tears and The Card Player.

Neil said...

16) Grayson Hall or Joan Bennett? Joan Bennett

17) When did you realize that you were a fan of the horror genre? And if you’re not, when did you realize you weren’t? Probably in my early teens through watching horror films on tv, and then later on video.

18) Favorite Bert I. Gordon (B.I.G.) movie. Pass

19) Name an obscure horror favorite that you wish more people knew about. I’ve a soft spot for John Schlesinger’s The Believer and 1988’s Spellbinder, but I can’t imagine many people sharing my enthusiasm. It’s a pity Michael Mann’s The Keep has been unavailable on dvd. Wolfen is under-rated, and Alfred Sole’s Communion deserves to be better known.

20) The Human Centipede-- yes or no? No

21) And while we’re in the neighborhood, is there a horror film you can think of that you felt “went too far”? It’s great when you can still be shocked or unsettled by a horror film. There’s a scene in the French film In My Skin where Marina de Van is (IIRC) cutting into her skin, picking at the wounds, sucking on her blood, and in one instance lying on her back and positioning her bleeding legs high in the air so that the blood drips onto her face. I was watching that sequence with my hands over my face, peeking through my fingers, or not able to watch it at all. Another French film Inside I thought was extremely uncomfortable to watch. The scene in Theatre of Blood where the Coral Browne’s character is electrocuted with red-hot curlers that causes her hair to fall out, revealing a red, blistering scalp is one of the most horrific scenes I’ve ever seen in a movie.

22) Name a film that is technically outside the horror genre that you might still feel comfortable describing as a horror film. Deliverance

25) Name the critic or Web site you most enjoy reading on the subject of the horror genre. Robin Wood, although he never seems to actually enjoy horror movies for being scary or exciting, only concerning himself with analyzing their themes and ideas.

26) Most frightening image you’ve ever taken away from a horror movie. There’s something about the scene in the first Nightmare on Elm Street movie where Heather Langenkamp runs up the stairs and the steps just turn to a mushy swamp. When I saw that the first time, I think I gasped and a shudder of recognition in that image went through my entire body.

27) Your favorite memory associated with watching a horror movie. I remember watching the original version of The Crazies on a small black and white portable tv in my bedroom in my early teens. I thought it was terrifying – a horror film with events that I believed could actually happen. Also watching The Omen for the very first time with my parents and older sister when it was premiered on British tv sometime in the early eighties (I must have been around 13 or 14.) I found it genuinely terrifying, and I don’t think I slept that night at all, and I really believed I could see the rottweillers from that scene in the cemetery, in the darkness looking down on me. I also remember seeing the original The Hills Have Eyes when my sister rented the video round about the same time. I thought it was going to be scary, I wasn’t prepared for the sheer unpleasantness and brutality of it.

28) What would you say is the most important/significant horror movie of the past 20 years (1992-2012)? Why? I’m not sure if Seven is the most important/significant horror film of the past 20 years but seems to me to be one of the most imitated. There’s been so many movies (The Bone Collector) and even tv programs (Britain’s Wire in the Blood for example) that feature fetishistic serial-killers whose crime scenes resembles an art installation, and whose killings seem to be created as a dialogue between them and their pursuers.

29) Favorite Dr. Phibes curse (from either film). Pass

30) You are programming an all-night Halloween horror-thon for your favorite old movie palace. What five movies make up your schedule? Short Night of Glass Dolls, Carrie, Suspiria, The Evil Dead, The Wicker Man

W.B. Kelso said...

Quiz answers are go:

http://microbrewreviews.blogspot.com
/2011/10/meme-leech-quiz-or-die-im-
pickin-up.html

Ivan said...

The United Provinces of Ivanlandia has taken the test!
Answers are posted here:
http://ivanlandia1.blogspot.com/2011/10/horror-horror-or-getting-dr-phibes-vibe.html

Thanks!

Beveridge D. Spenser said...

Sadly, I learned almost everything I know about horror movies secondhand. I almost never watch them - too chicken.

But I did want to give a shout-out to the B-Movie Cast and the Naschy Cast. These two podcasts are great fun to listen to. But in all the time I've listened, I've almost never been inspired to watch.

Kevin J. Olson said...

Hey Dennis! My answers can be found on my blog here.

Thanks for another great quiz!

lrobhubbard said...

Part II:

16) Grayson Hall or Joan Bennett?

Grayson Hall

17) When did you realize that you were a fan of the horror genre? And if you’re not, when did you realize you weren’t?

I didn't start out as a horror fan... I really tried to avoid it when I was younger. But exposure to the stories of Richard Matheson and early Bradbury muddied the waters; then I discovered Stephen King. This would've been around 1980 - 81. After that, I began catching up.

18) Favorite Bert I. Gordon (B.I.G.) movie.

VILLAGE OF THE GIANTS. It's really stupid, yes, BUT - Jack Nietzche's awesome theme song (that Tarantino stole for DEATH PROOF) and Beau Bridges & Friends frugging it up in slo-mo; Joe Turkel and Toni Basil doing her thing; The Beau Brummels -- gotta love it!

19) Name an obscure horror favorite that you wish more people knew about.

EYES OF FIRE, written and directed by Avery Crounse. A mid-80's favorite that's worth searching for.

20) The Human Centipede-- yes or no?

NO. I think that I've gotten way past gimmicks, and that's ALL that CENTIPEDE is... although it's a good gimmick - but not a good film.

21) And while we’re in the neighborhood, is there a horror film you can think of that you felt “went too far”?

In the 'grossness factor', there are several that I do think go 'too far' for no other reason than to see who's willing to "double-dog dare see" such sick shit - I don't really consider those horror, since the emotion usually invoked is revulsion - then boredom. Then it becomes a game as to who can 'top' the last sick act.

22) Name a film that is technically outside the horror genre that you might still feel comfortable describing as a horror film.

TAKE SHELTER. It won't be described as horror - it's sort of a contemporary NOAH'S ARK story - but it certainly IS... and it's brilliant. Go immediately to see it when it opens in your area.


23) Lara Parker or Kathryn Leigh Scott?

Lara Parker

24) If you’re a horror fan, at some point in your past your dad, grandmother, teacher or some other disgusted figure of authority probably wagged her/his finger at you and said, “Why do you insist on reading/watching all this morbid monster/horror junk?” How did you reply? And if that reply fell short somehow, how would you have liked to have replied?

I don't think that I ever had a reply, other than saying, "I like it!" Horror in literature actually has a long and pretty solid pedigree - it gradually became slightly disreputable, which is how Horror likes to be seen. I personally think that there are some matters of taste, but they're individual and Horror, to be effective, has to ignore them to a degree.

Which is why, if I were asked that question now, I'd have to reply, "F**k You!"

25) Name the critic or Web site you most enjoy reading on the subject of the horror genre.

I like Stacie Ponder (FINAL GIRL), though I don't share her love of slasher flicks; Richard Harlan Smith; Tim Lucas; Jeff Allard. Kim Newman - have been enjoying the new edition of NIGHTMARE MOVIES, which should be a staple of any horror fan's library.

lrobhubbard said...

Part III (!)

26) Most frightening image you’ve ever taken away from a horror movie.

The faces in THE HAUNTING that pop up in the doorknob, the wall, and in the door when something attempts to push in.

And don't say it's 'overative imagination' - I KNOW that they're there...


27) Your favorite memory associated with watching a horror movie.

Watching THE HAUNTING with my first college crush - I probably came close to breaking her hand from squeezing it so much...

28) What would you say is the most important/significant horror movie of the past 20 years (1992-2012)? Why?

THE BLAIR WITCH PROJECT. Because it ushered in and defined 'lo-no budget' horror for the digital age -- its influence is still kicking in "reality" ghost-hunting shows for TV, and endless variations from PARANORMAL ACTIVITY to APOLLO 18.

29) Favorite Dr. Phibes curse (from either film).

The locust curse, with the victim covered in syrup, then locusts unleashed upon them.

30) You are programming an all-night Halloween horror-thon for your favorite old movie palace. What five movies make up your schedule?

THE HAUNTING (1963)
GOKE - BODYSNATCHER FROM HELL
HORROR EXPRESS
POSSESSION (1981)
EYES OF FIRE

Kevyn Knox said...

Ack!! Now I need to actually answer all these questions. I love these lists, so I guess I should hurry and do that. Coming soon...

RobertDaniel said...

PART ONE
1) Favorite Vincent Price/American International Pictures release.

The Masque of the Red Death. This elegant, creepy horror film is Corman’s finest moment. Price gives an excellent performance as the odious prince. Seeing him and the other guests get what’s coming to him is rewarding, but still scary. The film is also beautiful to look at, thanks to the cinematography of the brilliant Nicholas Roeg. Fans of Poe will also note the dash of “Hop Frog” thrown into the mix.

2) What horror classic (or non-classic) that has not yet been remade would you like to see upgraded for modern audiences?

At first I was going to say Who Can Kill a Child? Or The Innocents, two of the scariest films ever made. Then I thought, no, those are about perfect as is and just need to be seen more, not remade. I’m going to go with a rather obscure but effective little thriller called The Possession of Joel Delaney. The premise is, like most horror movies I guess, absurd (Shirley McClaine becomes convinced her younger brother Perry King is possessed by a Puerto Rican serial killer). However, the film is quite effective at mounting the dread, leading to an intense and shocking ending where the brother psychologically tortures McClaine and her children. What diluted the movie for me, and could be easily improved upon now, are the special effects. To be blunt, there are two beheadings in the film, but the heads looked so paper-mache fake I wondered if they were even intended to be real.

3) Jonathan Frid or Thayer David?

I have to go with Frid. He WAS Barnabas Collins. To quote Seinfeld, “not that there’s anything wrong with that,” but when I think of David, I always think of Rocky first.

4) Name the one horror movie you need to see that has so far eluded you.

Val Lewton’s The Seventh Victim. I only recently heard of this Lewton film and I’ve heard it’s a gem that was very ahead of its time and influential (perhaps a precursor to Rosemary’s Baby).

5) Favorite film director most closely associated with the horror genre.

Can I have a tie? John Carpenter and Dario Argento. Yes, both have gone way off the rails at times (Ghosts of Mars; Mother of Tears), but both also have underappreciated gems (The Fog; In the Mouth of Madness; Four Flies on Grey Velvet; Tenebrae) as well as their flat out masterpieces (Halloween; The Thing; Deep Red; Suspiria). When both men are on, they are among the best.

6) Ingrid Pitt or Barbara Steele?

This is a tough call, but I will go with Steele. Ingrid Pitt is perhaps the more classically beautiful, but Steele has such an amazing, unique look, especially her eyes. Steele is not only excellent in The Pit and the Pendulum (the final close up of her eyes still packs a jolt), but I will go so far as to say that her role in Bava’s Black Sunday is irreplaceable-like Wayne in The Searchers and Nicholson in Cuckoo’s Nest, I can’t picture anyone but Steele as Asa.

7) Favorite 50’s sci-fi/horror creature.

The Creature from the Black Lagoon. The creature is creepy looking (I wouldn’t want to know he was lurking in the water just below me) yet also evokes sympathy (like Kong, he can’t help falling for the girl).

8) Favorite/best sequel to an established horror classic.

Dawn of the Dead. Though I feel Night of the Living Dead is scarier and more claustrophobic, Dawn is perhaps even more potent in its social commentary, not to mention a landmark in gory special effects. Both are among the best, most influential of all horror films.

RobertDaniel said...

PART TWO
9) Name a sequel in a horror series which clearly signaled that the once-vital franchise had run out of gas.

Rob Zombie’s odious Halloween 2 (aka White Trash Gettin’ Cut Up Reeaal Good) effectively killed off Michael Myers, I’m afraid. What a shame. The original is one of my favorite films of all time, period and I loved it so much I flew to the 30th anniversary convention back in 2008. I just don’t see how the series can recover from the mess Zombie made of the franchise. Thanks a lot Zomie! RIP Michael.

10) John Carradine or Lon Chaney Jr.?

It’s close, but Chaney. There is a sadness to Chaney that always evoked sympathy, particularly with his great performance in The Wolf Man. Carradine had his moments, but he did too many crap movies late in his career.

11) What was the last horror movie you saw in a theater? On DVD or Blu-ray?

The last horror DVD I saw was Shock, an obscure Italian fright fest that was Mario Bava’s final film. The best aspect of it was a creepy little kid at the center of it named Marco (and much of the film was unintentionally funny, as Claudia Argento spent much of the picture screaming “Marco! MARCO!” as he kept getting into trouble).

The first Halloween remake by Zombie was the last horror film I saw in a theater. Not a great film anyway, but the experience was ruined by kids who wouldn’t close their cells phones. Not a pleasant experience.

12) Best foreign-language fiend/monster.

Max Shrek as Nosferatu in Murnau’s German masterpiece. Nearly a century later, Shrek’s appearance and performance is still frightening and mesmerizing.

13) Favorite Mario Bava movie.

Kill Baby! Kill! Is the mother of all creepy kid movies (I’d still run screaming if I ever saw Melissa). It is also a great showcase for Bava’s genius with color and lighting. The highlight is the finale in the haunted castle, where the doctor somehow chases himself!

A close second would be his brutal Rabid Dogs. Not a horror film per se, but the film, in which three thugs hold a man, woman and sick child hostage in a car, is as brutal, intense and unrelenting as any film I’ve seen in a long time.

14) Favorite horror actor and actress.

My favorite horror actress is the giallo queen Edwige Fenech. Not only is she stunningly gorgeous (still!), but it is no small feat to carry a number of ultra trashy giallos and still come out looking elegant and dignified. Her best work: The Strange Vice of Ms. Wardh, as she is quite sexy and sympathetic as the titular woman in peril.

My favorite horror actor is Vincent Price. There is simply no equal to that voice. Few actors, save perhaps for Hopkins and Lee, can match his uncanny ability to be sophisticated and creepy at the same time. His best work is when he is at his most loathsome and villainous, namely The Masque of the Red Death and The Witchfinder General.

15) Name a great horror director’s least effective movie.

I mentioned this earlier, but Argento’s Mother of Tears was a thunderous, awful disappointment. Suspiria so haunted and amazed me when I first saw it that I have been a loyal fan of his for years. Even the outlandish sequel Inferno (which someone perfectly described as not a good film at all but still somehow a great film) had its charms. Mother of Tears was a flat out mess, as it featured scenes meant to shock, but were so poorly executed that they were only offensive. The ending (in which the all powerful, demonic witch was played by a nude model who couldn’t act) was MST3K worthy bad. He never should have made this one.

16) Grayson Hall or Joan Bennett?

Bennett pulls ahead thanks to her final film role-as Madame Blanc in Suspiria.

RobertDaniel said...

PART THREE
17) When did you realize that you were a fan of the horror genre? And if you’re not, when did you realize you weren’t?

I used to be a scaredy cat and wouldn’t watch scary movies. Then I summoned up the courage to watch Halloween, one of the best ever. Yes, I was freaked out, but I came to realize that not only could I take it, but I actually liked the adrenaline rush! I also came to appreciate the mastery of Carpenter’s direction and how he could orchestrate pace, music and shadows to create just the right not of terror.

18) Favorite Bert I. Gordon (B.I.G.) movie.

Village of the Giants. So bad it’s good, to quote the old cliche. The world is threatened by a giant Beau Bridges and it’s up to Tommy Kirk and a young Ron Howard to save it. Also, as a young man in his puberty years, I couldn’t help but wish that yummy Joy Harmon would grow just another inch and bust out of the bikini barely containing her in all her giant glory.

19) Name an obscure horror favorite that you wish more people knew about.

Who Can Kill a Child? Anyone who sees it will not forget it. A man and his pregnant wife decide to vacation on a small island off the coast of Spain. When they arrive, they find that the island is completely deserted, save for the children. They soon discover the truth: something (like The Birds, never explained), has turned the children on the island into murderous psychopaths. In this truly disturbing film, the pursued couple must face the question posed by the film’s very title in order to survive. The suspense builds to an unbearable tension-and the death scene of one character near the end took me days to get over. 


20) The Human Centipede-- yes or no?

Hell no. If one is a horror fan, one has to face the fact that horror walks as close to the edge of being morally dubious as any film genre. Films that show extreme human cruelty and suffering can be defensible if they have some sort of artistic merit (Salo, even The Texas Chainsaw Massacre). THC is a geek show, designed for those who “get off” watching a snake eat a live mouse or a hostage beheading in Iraq. I won’t waste my time watching a so called film whose main purpose is to show three people being tortured and degraded.

21) And while we’re in the neighborhood, is there a horror film you can think of that you felt “went too far”?

Martyrs (2008). The premise is that a cult believes that if young women are tortured and tormented to the point of death, they will offer a portal to the afterlife. The violence and cruelty inflicted upon the women in this film (especially the lead, as the last 30 minutes is an endless string of brutality inflicted on her) was so extreme that I did feel guilty for watching it.

22) Name a film that is technically outside the horror genre that you might still feel comfortable describing as a horror film.

The Silence of the Lambs. The Academy seemed somewhat embarrassed about giving their little golden man to a horror film, so SOTL was often described as a “crime drama” or “thriller.” C’mon! Admit it, it’s a horror film!.

23) Lara Parker or Kathryn Leigh Scott?

I’ll go with Parker for doing Race with the Devil.

RobertDaniel said...

PART FOUR
24) If you’re a horror fan, at some point in your past your dad, grandmother, teacher or some other disgusted figure of authority probably wagged her/his finger at you and said, “Why do you insist on reading/watching all this morbid monster/horror junk?” How did you reply? And if that reply fell short somehow, how would you have liked to have replied?

One fact of life we will all have to face is that we are going to die. Horror as an art form faces this truth head on (though the means by which it faces it are limitless).

Two, virtually all the great directors have either directed horror films or have incorporated elements of suspense and terror in their work. To truly create suspense and terror takes talent and horror offers a blank canvas for the great directors to showcase their talent.

Three, sometimes we want to laugh, other times we want to cry. And sometimes we want the thrill of a good scare. There is nothing wrong with wanting to experience all these emotions.

25) Name the critic or Web site you most enjoy reading on the subject of the horror genre.

Rue Morgue magazine I guess, maybe because they’ve published two of my letters.

26) Most frightening image you’ve ever taken away from a horror movie.

This is close. Horror images that are implanted on my brain range from the extended hand of the doomed child being literally dragged into Hell alive in Drag Me to Hell to Michael Myers’ famous “zombie sit up” behind Laurie Strode in Carpenter’s Halloween to the ghastly image of Carrie White covered in pig blood.
Still, the first time I watched the original Black Christmas, I was alone. When it was over, I had to check every room and every closet in my apartment before I could try to go to sleep and I lay there in the dark, fully alert to every sound and partly mad at myself for watching this movie right before going to bed.
Much of my terror was due to one of the most bone chilling shots I’ve ever seen: The audience never gets a good look at the killer-save for a single, horrifying shot of his crazed eye through a crack in a door. The mystery around him, the fact that you never get a good look at him, makes him all the more frightening.
27) Your favorite memory associated with watching a horror movie.
As a kid, one image that got to me was the sight of Sissy Spacek covered in blood in Carrie. I would run from the room any time they showed a Carrie trailer and would never look at the poster. Of course, my dear sister couldn’t help torturing me by whispering “Carrie’s coming to get you!”
A few years later, it came on CBS late night. I decided to face my fears and watch it. My dad decided he wanted to watch it too. What always struck me was not only how scary the film was, but also how surprisingly sad and moving it was, buoyed by two truly great performances by Spacek and by Piper Laurie as her deranged mother.
Then the ending happened. Seeing “Carrie White burns in hell” on the cross was chilling enough. Seeing the hand reach out made me hit the ceiling. I looked over at my dad (who went to college on a football scholarship and coached football as well) and his eyes were as big as saucers. It had scared him shitless too. He said, in a matter of fact voice “Wasn’t expecting that, bud!”

RobertDaniel said...

PART FIVE
28) What would you say is the most important/significant horror movie of the past 20 years (1992-2012)? Why?
Takashi Miike’s Audition (1999). It is a seminal horror film in two ways:
One, it opened up the West to the riches of horror cinema coming from the East (Ringu, Ju-On, A Tale of Two Sisters, One Missed Call).
Two, for better or worse, it took the gloves off for horror cinema again and opened the door for the extreme graphic violence seen both internationally (Frontiers, Inside, Ils, Switchblade Romance) and domestically (Saw, Hostel).
29) Favorite Dr. Phibes curse (from either film).
I have to go with the hungry rats in the plane. The scene has such a sense of terrifying helplessness (trying to control a plane while rats are literally gnawing at you). The close up of a rat tearing at a supposed piece of flash only heightens the ick factor. What a bad, bad thing to do, Dr. Phibes!

30) You are programming an all-night Halloween horror-thon for your favorite old movie palace. What five movies make up your schedule?
Maybe I’d program something geared around our five favorite Halloween monsters:
Ghosts: The Innocents (The Shining is my favorite ghost story, but it’s too long for a horrorthon-and ARE YOU SURE there are ghosts in it? )
Vampires-Todd Holland’s Fright Night-scary but offers some good laughs as well. Lots of fun and a break from my other films.
Witches: Suspiria-no question.
The boogeyman: The original Halloween of course!
The undead/Ole’ Scratch: Luchio Fulchi’s The Beyond. This HAS to the last one shown, about 2:00AM or so. Only for the hardcore horror fans. It’s truly indefensible: the plot makes no sense, the spiders eating Styrofoam eyeballs, the “Do Not Entry” sign, a girl in braids getting her head blown off. Still-I’m sorry, but it’s great!!

le0pard13 said...

I always enjoy your movie quizzes, Dennis. My answers can be found here. Thanks.

jamie said...

28) What would you say is the most important/significant horror movie of the past 20 years (1992-2012)? Why?

The rise of Asian (specifically J-Horror) Horror. The singular event would probably then be the career of T. Miike that demented genius. AUDITION, VISITOR Q, GOZU, ICHI THE KILLER, and IMPRINT all stand as sufficient examples of his Horror acumen and profound brilliance.

29) Favorite Dr. Phibes curse (from either film).

It's a metaphysical one: it was the film Keith Moon was watching when he passed out from taking like 30 sedatives one night in 1978. He never woke up, and with him went the greatest drummer the Rock medium has ever seen.

30) You are programming an all-night Halloween horror-thon for your favorite old movie palace. What five movies make up your schedule?

I love doing horror-thons and I've found that Gore is king in these sort of things. Plus, I'd want to expose people to obscure gems that they'd never see elsewhere. So, I'd go with (in order):
1. Zulawski's POSSESSION. Because you have to grab them right off the bat.
2. D'Amato's DEATH SMILES AT A MURDERER. Bizarro, send up. Perhaps Kinski's best film not directed by Herzog, and it took a director that sometimes directed porn to do it.
3. Ikeda's EVIL DEATH TRAP, a brilliant Japanese slasher send up.
4. Jess Franco's FACELESS. A violent, late 80's giallo remake of EYES WITHOUT A FACE.
5. I'd want to end with a crazy violent New French Extremity film, so it would probably be INSIDE. But IN MY SKIN, and SOMBRE would be on hand to depending on my mood. INSIDE is the most intense start to finish, and with people being groggy form watching 4 films that would assure that no one falls asleep!

Dennis Cozzalio said...

Jamie! Yikes! Can you please resend your first 27 answers? I accidentally included them with a bunch of G-D spam and they got deleted. So sorry!

Jamie said...

PART ONE
1) Favorite Vincent Price/American International Pictures release.

I'm tempted to say THE RAVEN just on cast alone, but I think PIT AND THE PENDULUM is the best of the bunch. Overall they aren't my favorite Horror films.

2) What horror classic (or non-classic) that has not yet been remade would you like to see upgraded for modern audiences?

Bob Clark's DEATHDREAM, updating it to the Iraq conflict. Lieberman's great BLUE SUNSHINE could work in a political subtext as well.

3) Jonathan Frid or Thayer David?

pass.

4) Name the one horror movie you need to see that has so far eluded you.

James Whale's THE OLD DARK HOUSE. I'll be seeing it in a few days however.

5) Favorite film director most closely associated with the horror genre.

I think Roman Polanski is the greatest Horror director ever, but more specific to the question I'd answer Sergio Martino.

6) Ingrid Pitt or Barbara Steele?

pass (but I'd say Steele).

7) Favorite 50’s sci-fi/horror creature.

Either the Demon from NIGHT OF THE DEMON or THE CREATURE FROM THE BLACK LAGOON.

8) Favorite/best sequel to an established horror classic.

Many good answers provided above, so I'll try a new one. How about PHANTASM II from 1988. It's a series that, as a whole, easily outdoes any of the more heralded ones from the 1980's. A great monster, fun moments, grossly underrated.

9) Name a sequel in a horror series which clearly signaled that the once-vital franchise had run out of gas.

FRIDAY THE 13TH PART VIII: JASON TAKES MANHATTAN. It's a shame as that Series is actually in it's peak from Episodes 3-7 (unlike the middle NIGHTMARES that are abysmal), but Part VIII is just terrible, even if it has a handful of laugh inducing fun moments.

10) John Carradine or Lon Chaney Jr.?

Pass, don't like these type of questions. Two much to consider with such finality.

11) What was the last horror movie you saw in a theater? On DVD or Blu-ray?

Theater: DREAM HOME, the Hong Kong slasher. DVD: watched the fabulous THE SEVENTH VICTIM again on Saturday night.

12) Best foreign-language fiend/monster.

Anyone who adorns a mask in ONIBABA and thus becomes a monster. (but god is 'Hitler' a cheeky brilliant answer above).

13) Favorite Mario Bava movie.

While THE WHIP AND THE BODY is perhaps the best one that most aren't aware of, I think LISA AND THE DEVIL is easily his masterpiece. It's more modern then his 60's B+W output and quite a bit more artistically vital.

14) Favorite horror actor and actress.

Actor, seems strange but how about Terence Stamp? He's brilliant in both THE COLLECTOR and Fellini's TOBY DAMMIT. Plus, there's something kind of scary about TEOREMA too.

Actress, can only really be Edwige Fenech. No other answers are acceptable.

15) Name a great horror director’s least effective movie.

Dario Argento, anything post-TRAUMA or so. Many of those films are horrendous.

Jamie said...

PART TWO

16) Grayson Hall or Joan Bennett?

Again, pass.

17) When did you realize that you were a fan of the horror genre? And if you’re not, when did you realize you weren’t?

When I was 8 or so a VHS tape labeled 'SCANNERS' showed me heads exploding. Not only was that the paused moment that made me a Horror fan, it made me a film fan as well.

18) Favorite Bert I. Gordon (B.I.G.) movie.

TORMENTED is the only one I've seen I believe.

19) Name an obscure horror favorite that you wish more people knew about.

Easy: DEATH LAID AN EGG from 1968. It's like a giallo made by Jean Luc Godard. From the same guy that made the also brilliant DJANGO KILL! (IF YOU LIVE SHOOT!), one of the greatest acid Westerns/Horror films ever made.

The German ANGST is another.

20) The Human Centipede-- yes or no?

Yes, and no. Yes, on moral grounds (which I suppose is how the question is intended) as all art or entertainment has a right to exist, and No as a film. It's just not very good, and the second is even worse.

21) And while we’re in the neighborhood, is there a horror film you can think of that you felt “went too far”?

Not possible. Even films like the GUINEA PIG series that are just exercises in FX/gore makeup creation have a right to exist.

22) Name a film that is technically outside the horror genre that you might still feel comfortable describing as a horror film.

Anything by Lynch, specifically BLUE VELVET and LOST HIGHWAY. But, I've always gotten strange looks when I put A FACE OF ANOTHER (the Japanese film) in my top horror lists.

23) Lara Parker or Kathryn Leigh Scott?

Pass.

24) If you’re a horror fan, at some point in your past your dad, grandmother, teacher or some other disgusted figure of authority probably wagged her/his finger at you and said, “Why do you insist on reading/watching all this morbid monster/horror junk?” How did you reply? And if that reply fell short somehow, how would you have liked to have replied?

Thankfully I also never had this happen. I think my parents saw the reaction I had to Horror films (mostly laughter) and understood that I understood that none of it was real, so it was essentially harmless.

25) Name the critic or Web site you most enjoy reading on the subject of the horror genre.

I like the trade websites for news. The Fangora's, Bloody Disusting's etc of the world.

26) Most frightening image you’ve ever taken away from a horror movie.

In BEGOTTEN when the 'God/Messiah' figure is cut out of the stomach by a straight razor (and the cutting is done by the being giving birth). Freaky film.

27) Your favorite memory associated with watching a horror movie.

Anytime I could watch them with friends was a good time, either Pizza and soda/beer and tons of laughs. Whole films succeed in these environments, and I've said Simon's PIECES or SLUGS are the greatest 'beer and pizza' Horror films ever made.

I also recall an early such night when I was about 12 and rented THE EXORCIST and CHILD'S PLAY together and came away thinking CHILD'S PLAY was the better film!

Bemis said...

1) Favorite Vincent Price/American International Pictures release.
The Abominable Dr. Phibes, as a matter of fact.

2) What horror classic (or non-classic) that has not yet been remade would you like to see upgraded for modern audiences?
The Funhouse - such a great premise, and the original is a lot of fun but not so iconic that a remake would feel like sacrelige.

3) Jonathan Frid or Thayer David?
Jonathan Frid

4) Name the one horror movie you need to see that has so far eluded you.
The Curse of Frankenstein

5) Favorite film director most closely associated with the horror genre.
John Carpenter

6) Ingrid Pitt or Barbara Steele?
Ingrid Pitt

7) Favorite 50’s sci-fi/horror creature.
The "Id Monster" from Forbidden Planet.

8) Favorite/best sequel to an established horror classic.
Dawn of the Dead

9) Name a sequel in a horror series which clearly signaled that the once-vital franchise had run out of gas.
Hellraiser IV: Bloodline

10) John Carradine or Lon Chaney Jr.?
Lon Chaney Jr.

11) What was the last horror movie you saw in a theater? On DVD or Blu-ray?
In a theater, Fright Night. On DVD, Scream 4.

12) Best foreign-language fiend/monster.
Kinski in Nosferatu.

13) Favorite Mario Bava movie.
Black Sunday

14) Favorite horror actor and actress.
Donald Pleasance and Sigourney Weaver. As many reputable movies as she's appeared in, her performances as Lt. Ellen Ripley remain her best work.

15) Name a great horror director’s least effective movie.
Ghosts of Mars

Bemis said...

16) Grayson Hall or Joan Bennett?
Joan Bennett

17) When did you realize that you were a fan of the horror genre? And if you’re not, when did you realize you weren’t?
Around 4 years old, sneaking into the living room late at night and glimpsing a few scenes from Halloween. I had my had my hands over my eyes for most of it, I had nightmares for a month and I couldn't wait to see the whole movie.

18) Favorite Bert I. Gordon (B.I.G.) movie.
Earth vs. the Spider

19) Name an obscure horror favorite that you wish more people knew about.
Mario Bava's Shock (AKA Beyond the Door II)

20) The Human Centipede-- yes or no?
I haven't seen it yet. I will soon, at Jason Alley's request.

21) And while we’re in the neighborhood, is there a horror film you can think of that you felt “went too far”?
One of the purposes of the horror genre is to go to far - many of the very best horror movies explore transgressive ideas and situations. That said, I have a problem with the killing of real animals in Cannibal Holocaust and a few others.

22) Name a film that is technically outside the horror genre that you might still feel comfortable describing as a horror film.
Eraserhead

23) Lara Parker or Kathryn Leigh Scott?
Lara Parker

24) If you’re a horror fan, at some point in your past your dad, grandmother, teacher or some other disgusted figure of authority probably wagged her/his finger at you and said, “Why do you insist on reading/watching all this morbid monster/horror junk?” How did you reply? And if that reply fell short somehow, how would you have liked to have replied?
I had a few teachers, over the years, who "tsk-tsked" my reading Stephen King and EC Comics, or sharing VHS copies of horror movies with classmates. At the Christian school I attended for a few years, I was told more than once that Jesus would disapprove of my fascination with horror. If I could go back in time, I'd let them know that, a few years later, Jesus would be a subject of a grisly splatter movie that is also the highest-grossing Christian-themed movie of all time. I doubt they'd believe me.

25) Name the critic or Web site you most enjoy reading on the subject of the horror genre.
Stacie Ponder

26) Most frightening image you’ve ever taken away from a horror movie.
From The Shining: The woman in Room 237, cackling maniacally as she reaches out for a petrified Jack Nicholson.

27) Your favorite memory associated with watching a horror movie.
Watching The Shining for the first time with my mom and dad. It was one of the first movies that, before I had the correct terminology to describe what I was seeing, I started to notice what a director does.

28) What would you say is the most important/significant horror movie of the past 20 years (1992-2012)? Why?
Scream. Before it was released, horror had been mostly stagnant for several years. Everything since Scream is either influenced by, borrowing or stealing from it (the long list of postmodern or self-referential horror), or a direct reaction to it (the deliberate move away from the postmodern in the form of torture porn, J-horror, etc.). This is made obvious in Scream 4, which is partly about how the series seems like an ancient relic now that the genre and its fans have completely absorbed and integrated its sense of ironic detachment (I can't tell if I love or hate Scream 4 for being about its own irrelevance).

29) Favorite Dr. Phibes curse (from either film).
Locusts!

30) You are programming an all-night Halloween horror-thon for your favorite old movie palace. What five movies make up your schedule?
The Haunting, Suspiria, The Evil Dead, Creepshow, They Live

Vulnavia Morbius said...

I went to the Vincentennial in St. Louis earlier this year. They had, well, everything on the big screen. They even brought in Roger Corman to introduce a couple of films. It was awesome. Normally, I envy the movie events on the coasts, but not this time.

Anyway, here are my answers:

1) Favorite Vincent Price/American International Pictures release.

The Masque of the Red Death

2) What horror classic (or non-classic) that has not yet been remade would you like to see upgraded for modern audiences?

Ghost Story

3) Jonathan Frid or Thayer David?
|
Jonathan Frid

4) Name the one horror movie you need to see that has so far eluded you.

I’m told that I need to see Martyrs.

5) Favorite film director most closely associated with the horror genre.

David Cronenberg is the easy answer (because it’s true), but he’s moved out of the genre, so let’s go with Mario Bava.

6) Ingrid Pitt or Barbara Steele?

Barbara Steele. Who I met earlier this year. I got her to sign my laserdisc of 8-1/2.

7) Favorite 50’s sci-fi/horror creature.

The Id monster in Forbidden Planet

8) Favorite/best sequel to an established horror classic.

Son of Frankenstein

9) Name a sequel in a horror series which clearly signaled that the once-vital franchise had run out of gas.

Um…Friday the 13th part, um 1?

10) John Carradine or Lon Chaney Jr.?

John Carradine. Can’t tame what was meant to be wild, Doc.

11) What was the last horror movie you saw in a theater? On DVD or Blu-ray?

In a theater? Tucker and Dale vs. Evil. On DVD? Wake Wood. Plus several others  streamed to my TV from the internet.

12) Best foreign-language fiend/monster.

The Pale Man in Pan’s Labyrinth

13) Favorite Mario Bava movie.

Black Sabbath

14) Favorite horror actor and actress.

Boris Karloff and Barbara Steele

15) Name a great horror director’s least effective movie.

Carpenter’s Village of the Damned

Vulnavia Morbius said...

16) Grayson Hall or Joan Bennett?

Joan Bennett

17) When did you realize that you were a fan of the horror genre? And if you’re not, when did you realize you weren’t?

Ten years old. It was Night of the Living Dead that did it.

18) Favorite Bert I. Gordon (B.I.G.) movie.

The Mad Bomber

19) Name an obscure horror favorite that you wish more people knew about.

Pretty Poison, maybe, or Let’s Scare Jessica to Death

20) The Human Centipede-- yes or no?

None for me, thanks.

21) And while we’re in the neighborhood, is there a horror film you can think of that you felt “went too far”?

The animal mutilation in Cannibal Holocaust is beyond the pale.

22) Name a film that is technically outside the horror genre that you might still feel comfortable describing as a horror film.


Apocalypse Now, absolutely.

23) Lara Parker or Kathryn Leigh Scott?

Lara Parker, but only just.

24) If you’re a horror fan, at some point in your past your dad, grandmother, teacher or some other disgusted figure of authority probably wagged her/his finger at you and said, “Why do you insist on reading/watching all this morbid monster/horror junk?” How did you reply? And if that reply fell short somehow, how would you have liked to have replied?

This never happened to me.

25) Name the critic or Web site you most enjoy reading on the subject of the horror genre.

Kim Newman, I think.

26) Most frightening image you’ve ever taken away from a horror movie.

The dead woman in the “Drop of Water” segment of Black Sabbath. Brrr.

27) Your favorite memory associated with watching a horror movie.

Watching The Spiral Staircase with my mom when I was 12.

28) What would you say is the most important/significant horror movie of the past 20 years (1992-2012)? Why?

The Ring (original Japanese version), because it’s the flashpoint of the Asian horror explosion.

29) Favorite Dr. Phibes curse (from either film).

Technically, it’s the hail scene in the first film, but given that Theater of Blood is a Dr. Phibes movie in most respects, I’d qualify this by citing Robert Morley stuffed full of his own poodles.

30) You are programming an all-night Halloween horror-thon for your favorite old movie palace. What five movies make up your schedule?

Eyes Without a Face
The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (1974)
Trick ‘r’ Treat (2007)
Frankenstein (1931)
The Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956)

Susie Bright said...

Hells' bells! It's time for Dr. Anton's Phibes' Abomimably Erudite, Musically Malignant, Cursedly Clever Halloween Horror Movie Quiz!

As you know, I am a diehard fan of the rigorous movie quizzes devised by Dennis Cozzalio at his swoon-worthy filmblog, Sergio Leone and the Infield Fly Rule.

I am posting my answers on his blog, along with everyone else who's playing... but here's an extended version, with film clips and photos. Come over and post your answers, it's sooooo fun; more like an interview than an exam.

Let me stretch my cold blue hands from their keyboard coffin and begin:



1) Favorite Vincent Price/American International Pictures release.

My earnest favorite is the “The House of Usher.” I like to think Price truly drank the Poe Kool-Aid and gave himself to that role.



However, for sheer “Tales of Pre-Stonewall Homosexual Alcoholism,” the best is surely Price, Rathbone, and Lorre in Tales of Terror. Matt Crowley likely watched this before he wrote The Boys in the Band.

I also gasp at “Raven” for the debut of that handsome, full-head-of-hair jackanape, Jack Nicholson.



2) What horror classic (or non-classic) that has not yet been remade would you like to see upgraded for modern audiences?

I have a longtime answer to this question.

I edited a lesbian magazine in the 1980s called On Our Backs. I discovered an erotic short story in our slush pile that was terrific, a sci-fi suspense-thriller featuring two amazing lovers/adversaries: Ripley and Vasquez.






I called the author on the phone, exclaiming over her inspiring characters. Wow, what originals! She was quiet on the other end of the line.

“Uh, haven’t you seen Alien?”

That’s how I came to rent the whole series. Nevertheless, I wrote back to my author, “I still wish your story was the movie; I love it the best.”

That was my introduction to slash fiction— I’ve read a lot of it now, much of it script-worthy!



3) Jonathan Frid or Thayer David?



Barney Barney Barney! I wasn't supposed to watch “Dark Shadows,” and it was the only soap I was interested in as a child. Frid's character and those pretty ladies’ décolletage are what stayed with me.



4) Name the one horror movie you need to see that has so far eluded you.

My glaring omission is The Exorcist. I read the book in broad daylight at fourteen and scared myself so badly I couldn’t sleep. I remember seeing the lines of people waiting for its debut at the movie theater in Westwood, and I thought, “No, I can’t take it, I can’t.”



5) Favorite film director most closely associated with the horror genre.

David Cronenberg.

But my favorite "horror" director not especially connected with horror is Roman Polanski.



6) Ingrid Pitt or Barbara Steele?




Barbara’s face is so memorable, that British porcelain in Italian camp. She worked with Fellini, right? You have to love a Felliniesque horror vamp.



7) Favorite 50’s sci-fi/horror creature.




I never saw the movie, but the poster holds a special place in my heart: Attack of the 50 Foot Woman.

For sheer pathos, Frankenstein's monster, in his scene with the little girl.



8) Favorite/best sequel to an established horror classic.

Silence of the Lambs, although I don’t know if others would agree it is a “classic" horror pic, nor do many people remember it was a sequel.

I am revealing my love of thrillers and crime (which I consume far more than horror) and All Things Jodie.

After that, Alien 2.



9) Name a sequel in a horror series which clearly signaled that the once-vital franchise had run out of gas.

I am inadequate to this task. The last time I was stunned by the end of a franchise was when Julie Andrews stopped making G-rated movies.



10) John Carradine or Lon Chaney Jr.?

Chaney, absolutely, I love The Werewolf— and he made me cry in Mice and Men.

Susie Bright said...

11) What was the last horror movie you saw in a theater? On DVD or Blu-ray?

On DVD, probably an all-day Alien marathon.

On TV, the True Blood series.

Movie Theater: Cronenberg’s latest.



12) Best foreign-language fiend/monster.

I lean toward attractive monsters, sexy monsters, French monsters.

The one who touches my heart the most is the Beast in Cocteau’s La Belle et le Bête. I would never leave him!

However, in the course of preparing my answer to this question, I stumbled upon something I simply MUST watch tonight: Nazi zombies, in Dead Snow. Norwegian!









13) Favorite Mario Bava movie.

Need you ask? Diabolik! He robs from the rich to give to the girls. No horror, just pure pre-Bond awesomeness.









14) Favorite horror actor and actress.

My boyfriend right now is "Eric" in True Blood, played by Alexander Skarsgard. He and the Nazi Zombies can HAVE me.






Boris Karloff is my classic favorite, and my mother’s as well.

For classic old dames, I still get the willies thinking about Betty Davis in Hush Hush Sweet Charlotte.

As for contemporary horror-heroines, my hat is off to Natalie Portman in Black Swan— ballet plus psycho-horror PLUS feathers.








15) Name a great horror director’s least effective movie.

John Carpenter, Ghosts of Mars. But I feel bad even pointing that out, because The Thing is one of my favorite movies, ever.









16) Grayson Hall or Joan Bennett?

I can't choose— they're both inspiring.

I’ve waxed on about Joan before, so let me lavish some love on Grayson.

Who can forget her closet-case dyke in Night of the Iguana, or her sassy Madam in Satan In High Heels?

Their Dark Shadows moments were just one little twinkle on great careers from start to finish.







17) When did you realize that you were a fan of the horror genre? And if you’re not, when did you realize you weren’t?

I was raised quite obediently as girly-girl— I thought horror was for boys, along with mathematics and sports. I said horror movies were dumb— or frightful— and as I was “protected” from them as a child, I had no idea what I was missing. Occasionally I’d hear some chick screaming from a monster-rape reel, and I’d grimace. Stupid, stupid victim.

In the 80s, around the time I got the Ripley/Vasquez manuscript, I confided my horror-contempt to one of my colleagues, book critic Laura Miller.

She surprised me; she told me I was a fool to be missing out on some truly great movies. Laura seemed to know what would turn the key for me… and suggested an early Cronenberg: Brood. It’s psychiatric! It’s sexual! It’s Canadian! I was enraptured.





I always liked fantasy and fairy tales for their romance and cruelty, I just hadn’t figured out where to find those themes in horror. I also hadn’t yet discovered my horror heroines, women who make things happen.

Laura sealed the deal by lending me Carol Clover’s Men, Women, and Chainsaws: Gender in the Modern Horror Film, which, in part, prepared me to teach my first class on sexual representation in film, aka "Porn 101." That was 1992.

I suppose it's old hat now, but Clover’s writing about "The Final Girl" gave me a way into horror, to see beyond the shrieking raped-wretch. Women get to “do more stuff” in horror than just about any genre. In horror, once you start listening between the lines, gender is a tossed salad.



18) Favorite Bert I. Gordon (B.I.G.) movie.

I fail once again. I guess I know what I'm doing this Halloween.



19) Name an obscure horror favorite that you wish more people knew about.

The People Under The Stairs… it’s so bad it’s delicious.




Rabid… oh, Marilyn.









20) The Human Centipede-- yes or no?





Oh yes! YES! YES! This is exactly where the toilet flukeworm in X-Files was heading.

Susie Bright said...

21) And while we’re in the neighborhood, is there a horror film you can think of that you felt “went too far”?

“Going too far,” for me, is a desired mental destination. If something affects me, it’s done its magic, and my reaction says more about “me” than it does about the supposed line it crossed.

A favorite movie that pushed my buttons this way was I Spit on Your Grave. The ultimate in Old Testament Medieval Revenge. Camille Keaton is beyond The Final Girl— she is: The Rapture.

The first half of the film, her character is humiliated, raped, broken— left for dead. I could barely sit through it. No wonder this film was targeted by feminist picket lines and boycotts.

But had any of the protestors watched the SECOND half? What Keaton does to her rapists is TWICE as sick— and cold as ice. All one can do is applaud. Or laugh, evilly.


22) Name a film that is technically outside the horror genre that you might still feel comfortable describing as a horror film.

Recently, The Debt. Anything on a gynecologist’s table with a Nazi: Horror movie.


23) Lara Parker or Kathryn Leigh Scott?

Lara Parker, by a hair— but I'm not really into either of these girls.


24) If you’re a horror fan, at some point in your past your dad, grandmother, teacher or some other disgusted figure of authority probably wagged their finger at you and said, “Why do you insist on watching all this morbid horror junk?” How did you reply?

“Can I watch just two more minutes?”

And if that reply fell short somehow, how would you have liked to have replied?

“When I grow up, I’m going to do whatever I want and you won’t be able to stop me.” —

That’s what I was thinking all the time.

But I never would have said that, because the “violence” that would have ensued would make any horror movie look like a walk in the park!

Susie Bright said...

25) Name the critic or Web site you most enjoy reading on the subject of the horror genre.

I'm a neophyte. Tell me and I'll follow.

26) Most frightening image you’ve ever taken away from a horror movie.

How about the most frightening image I DIDN’T take away? There’s nothing like anticipating a shock, which you’ve been told your whole life is “beyond the pale”... only to find out it’s a con.

Snuff fooled so many people. What an advertising campaign! What a rout! It managed to get banned in several cities, become a centerpiece of feminist outrage for a good decade… and it was all a big NOTHING.

The movie’s tag line was, “Made in South America, Where Life is Cheap!”

In fact, the “snuff” ending was shot in Hell’s Kitchen, where the film distributor was so cheap that he heated up a little Chef-Boy-R-Dee for the FX shot of the "victim’s" intestines. The dead actress couldn’t lay still.

The things they got away with, before the Internet...

But to answer your original question, the image that's never left me more haunted is Catherine Deneuve going nuts in Repulsion, which critic Kim Morgan outlines beautifully on her blog.

27) Your favorite memory associated with watching a horror movie.

Staying up by myself, watching vampire movies after mom went to bed.


28) What would you say is the most important/significant horror movie of the past twenty years (1992-2012)? Why?

Scream. It’s the Onion of Horror.


29) Favorite Dr. Phibes curse

“Work faster, doctor! The acid is descending!”


30) You are programming an all-night Halloween horror-thon for your favorite old movie palace. What five movies make up your schedule?

Just for a kick, how about a horror fest based on The Bechdel Test?

(The Bechdel Test requires a movie to pass three questions: 1) It has to have at least two women in it, 2) Who talk to each other, 3) About something besides a man.)



I'll choose five I’ve never seen:


28 Days Later

Resident Evil, After Life

Suspira

The Skeleton Key

The Ring


Do you think I'll like them?


BTW, I posted my fully-loaded answers to this quiz, on my blog, with pics and video.

http://susiebright.blogs.com/susie_brights_journal_/2011/10/halloween-film-quiz.html

Lackey said...

1) Favorite Vincent Price/American International Pictures release.

The Abominable Dr. Phibes.

2) What horror classic (or non-classic) that has not yet been remade would you like to see upgraded for modern audiences?

The Abominable Dr. Phibes.


3) Jonathan Frid or Thayer David?

I've never seen Dark Shadows.

4) Name the one horror movie you need to see that has so far eluded you.

Friday the 13th.

5) Favorite film director most closely associated with the horror genre.

David Cronenberg.

6) Ingrid Pitt or Barbara Steele?

Pitt.

7) Favorite 50’s sci-fi/horror creature.

Robby the Robot.

8) Favorite/best sequel to an established horror classic.

Quatermass and the Pit.

9) Name a sequel in a horror series which clearly signaled that the once-vital franchise had run out of gas.

Saw IV.

10) John Carradine or Lon Chaney Jr.?

Chaney.

11) What was the last horror movie you saw in a theater? On DVD or Blu-ray?

Theater: Demons. DVD: Amer.

12) Best foreign-language fiend/monster.

Godzilla.

13) Favorite Mario Bava movie.

Black Sabbath.

14) Favorite horror actor and actress.

Actor: Jeffrey Combs. Actress: Angela Bettis.

15) Name a great horror director’s least effective movie.

The Ward for Carpenter.

16) Grayson Hall or Joan Bennett?

I'll go with Bennet because she was in Suspiria.

17) When did you realize that you were a fan of the horror genre? And if you’re not, when did you realize you weren’t?

In my teens, when I discovered Stephen King.

18) Favorite Bert I. Gordon (B.I.G.) movie.

None.

19) Name an obscure horror favorite that you wish more people knew about.

Sigaw.

20) The Human Centipede-- yes or no?

Sure, why not.

21) And while we’re in the neighborhood, is there a horror film you can think of that you felt “went too far”?

No.

22) Name a film that is technically outside the horror genre that you might still feel comfortable describing as a horror film.

Arsenic and Old Lace.

23) Lara Parker or Kathryn Leigh Scott?

Is this another Dark Shadows question?

24) If you’re a horror fan, at some point in your past your dad, grandmother, teacher or some other disgusted figure of authority probably wagged her/his finger at you and said, “Why do you insist on reading/watching all this morbid monster/horror junk?” How did you reply? And if that reply fell short somehow, how would you have liked to have replied?

It's never happened.

25) Name the critic or Web site you most enjoy reading on the subject of the horror genre.

What, other than my own?

26) Most frightening image you’ve ever taken away from a horror movie.

Marty's hallucination in the bathroom from Poltergeist.

27) Your favorite memory associated with watching a horror movie.

Showing the "blood test" scene in Carpenter's The Thing to some friends who had never seen it before.

28) What would you say is the most important/significant horror movie of the past 20 years (1992-2012)? Why?

The Blair Witch Project, for sheer influence.

29) Favorite Dr. Phibes curse (from either film).

First film, the rats.

30) You are programming an all-night Halloween horror-thon for your favorite old movie palace. What five movies make up your schedule?

Martyrs, May, Dawn of the Dead ('78), Theatre of Blood, Nosferatu (original)

sinaphile said...

I know I'm totally gonna fail this, but here goes...

1) Favorite Vincent Price/American International Pictures release.

After seeing it last night and being blown to bits by the Nic Roeg cinematography...Masque of the Red Death.

2) What horror classic (or non-classic) that has not yet been remade would you like to see upgraded for modern audiences?

There was a children's writer named John Bellairs that I loved when I was young and still do. Maybe because Edward Gorey did all the front pieces for the books. Dunno. But those would be great.

3) Jonathan Frid or Thayer David?
...and I have never watched any Dark Shadows. This is where some awesome boy steps in and goes "I'll show you them!" and we have an awesome horror-fest. Yeah, I'm way behind.

4) Name the one horror movie you need to see that has so far eluded you.
Well, see above answer. Also, realistically, a GOOD chunk of the Hammer stuff. It's so sporadic. My life is a process of "fill in the blanks" not for lack of trying!
I JUST SAW JAWS THIS YEAR, OK?

5) Favorite film director most closely associated with the horror genre.
Cronenberg is that guy, I shall not want. He maketh me to watch the multi-textured pastures of body horror; He leadeth me beside unstill waters of insane greatness

6) Ingrid Pitt or Barbara Steele?
I don't think I'm qualified to speak on either. But Barbara Steele, on iconicness.

7) Favorite 50’s sci-fi/horror creature.
The Blob. I saw it and loved it. It's too cool for school.

8) Favorite/best sequel to an established horror classic.
My gut reaction says Bride of Frankenstein (I love me some Elsa Lanchester) but I'll always have a special place in my heart for Nightmare on Elm St 3: Dream Warriors (although how classic NOES is in the canon, I am unsure).

9) Name a sequel in a horror series which clearly signaled that the once-vital franchise had run out of gas.

I dunno, man. Once Jason goes to outer space...REALLY???? This is a kid who died on the bottom of a lake at a freakin' summer camp . Now, I am all about the Undead having a great afterlife, and all, but...a career with NASA?? Seriously??

10) John Carradine or Lon Chaney Jr.?
I will have my cake and eat it too. Even if I don't like cake. In this circumstance, nope. They have figured in too differently in my life.

11) What was the last horror movie you saw in a theater? On DVD or Blu-ray?
Theatrically? Insidious, I think. I really enjoyed it. DVD...Dunno.

12) Best foreign-language fiend/monster.
Err, I have foreign *silent* fiends that I like: The Phantom of the Opera & Nosferatu...then some modern-y ones in Pan's Labyrinth. I liked the Korean monster in The Host a LOT.

13) Favorite Mario Bava movie.
:( I have not seen as many as I would like. I almost didn't take this because I didn't want to answer this question. This is where I *do* actually feel kinda bad as a horror fan. I've seen all this other crap, but not a ton of Bava. I LOVE Danger: Diabolik though, and need to revisit Black Sunday.

14) Favorite horror actor and actress.
Nope. Too many eras, too many countries, too many varieties of horror. Can't decide on one.

sinaphile said...

15) Name a great horror director’s least effective movie.
Oh dear. Romero's Diary of the Dead made me sad, and I can't even get myself to watch anything Argento's done for the last few yrs.

16) Grayson Hall or Joan Bennett?
So the part where I have familiarity w/Joan Bennett & dig her in a big way and am not familiar w/the former answers this one.

17) When did you realize that you were a fan of the horror genre? And if you’re not, when did you realize you weren’t?
When I could recognize Vincent Price's voice on the THRILLER record as a kid. When the Count was the character that I looked forward to seeing THE MOST on Sesame Street. When Alice Cooper was on the Muppet Show & I didn't know who he was but I thought he was AWESOME. When I was reading books about serial killers, Daphne DuMaurier, and The Amityville Horror concurrently...before I was old enough to have braces.

18) Favorite Bert I. Gordon (B.I.G.) movie.
I've never seen any, so I'm gonna go for the easy answer: the one my grandma was in, Empire of the Ants. I really need to get on that. Man. I'm terrible.

19) Name an obscure horror favorite that you wish more people knew about.
Ha. No can do. With all the folks I know?? I'm always the kid who has to learn, scrambling behind. But I'll cast my vote for a film that y'all in the Horror Dads wrote about, Who Can Kill a Child? THAT film RULES.

20) The Human Centipede-- yes or no?
Nah. What's the point?

21) And while we’re in the neighborhood, is there a horror film you can think of that you felt “went too far”?
Yep. Martyrs. I thought it was truly awful. It was so hateful towards the female body under the guise of having some awkward weird political or social "message." Screw that.

22) Name a film that is technically outside the horror genre that you might still feel comfortable describing as a horror film.
Maybe Funny Games. It's hard. There are a ton of films that skirt psychological horror a bit but go more with another genre like noir or something.

23) Lara Parker or Kathryn Leigh Scott?
abstain

24) If you’re a horror fan, at some point in your past your dad, grandmother, teacher or some other disgusted figure of authority probably wagged her/his finger at you and said, “Why do you insist on reading/watching all this morbid monster/horror junk?” How did you reply? And if that reply fell short somehow, how would you have liked to have replied?

I shrugged and just said, "Because I like it." To be honest, years later, my answer would be the same.

25) Name the critic or Web site you most enjoy reading on the subject of the horror genre.

I like the Horror Dads stuff, the Movie Morlocks stuff...I've gotten so turned off by so many people's egos that I mostly just stick to those and articles that people link me to. Feel free to send more my way!!

sinaphile said...

26) Most frightening image you’ve ever taken away from a horror movie.
You might laugh, but the image of that kid facing the wall in Blair Witch Project scared the living crap outta me & still does. YES, I know it's not real. YES, it still creeps me out.

27) Your favorite memory associated with watching a horror movie.
Heh. Actually getting scared!! Valentine's Day w/a pal, we were at the Arclight, gonna see the new Rambo or the Orphanage. Y'know, something romantic. So we chose The Orphanage, and people actually threw popcorn in the air, yelped and....SO. DID. I. I made a noise!!
That was exciting. Nothing usually
"gets" me.

28) What would you say is the most important/significant horror movie of the past 20 years (1992-2012)? Why?
Nope. Can't do one. I think some genres are important. I think outta the last 20 yrs, the most important thing that has happened to AMERICAN horror is that we've widened our damn scope and realized that it's not all about us anymore. There's the Japanese, the Koreans, the Spanish, the Frence. These folks have always been there, making films, but somehow we've been ignoring them. Not anymore. THAT'S the most important achievement in the last 20 yrs, in my opinion.
Then we rip them off. Oh, oops, did I type that too?

29) Favorite Dr. Phibes curse (from either film).
Yeah....I need to see those films as well. Once again- any volunteers?

30) You are programming an all-night Halloween horror-thon for your favorite old movie palace. What five movies make up your schedule?

1) Nightmare on Elm St (1984)
2) The Unknown (1927)
3) Masque of the Red Death (1964)
4) Dawn of the Dead (1978)
5) The Thing (1982)
**if one of the prints couldn't come through--Near Dark (1987)

Mark said...

As always, I love these quizzes! I'm a little late to the party, but I posted my answers on my blog here:

http://kaedrin.com/weblog/archive/002137.html

Thanks!

weepingsam said...

Better late than never, and still in time for Halloween! My answers...

John Damer said...

1) A toss-up between The Masque of the Red Death and Witchfinder General.

2) Hmm… I think that John Carpenter’s Prince of Darkness could be redone (just call it something other than Prince of Darkness.) Have it be a low-budget, independent production and have the entire movie be like the last 15 minutes of the original. Also, although this one has been adapted three times, I think that Curt Siodmak’s novel Donovan’s Brain could be updated. Evil billionaire operating from beyond the grave set in our post-2008 economic meltdown world? Yes please. And dare I say it: the basic story of Manos: The Hands of Fate could re-constituted into something watchable and mainly intentionally disturbing.

3) I’ve never watched Dark Shadows so I’ll say Thayer David because he’s been in more movies, many of which I like.

4) There are a number of them, so I’ll just say the 1932 Murders in the Rue Morgue.

5) George Romero. His glory days are past but he’s the most important to me. And as well as being a director I like, I’m a fan of the man.

6) Barbara Steele, for her hypnotic writhing alone.

7) The spider in The Incredible Shrinking Man, Godzilla.

8) A toss-up between The Bride of Frankenstein and the original Dawn of the Dead.

9) Jaws: The Revenge.

10) John Carradine.

11) Wes Craven’s New Nightmare at the New Beverly on 10/24/2011 and Ken Russell’s The Devils.

13) Of what I’ve seen, Black Sabbath.

14) Boris Karloff and Linda Blair (and I’m putting Linda Blair because she needs more appreciation and a comeback role.)

15) Since I mentioned Romero, I would say Diary of the Dead. It’s awkward and its point is muddled.

16) Joan Bennett.

17) When I was a teenager (when else?) By that time, film and TV had inundated me to the point of a post-modern state of desensitization, but horror was the only Film/TV genre that could puncture through my bubble of indifference. Now that I’m older and more mature, many different types of films can affect me, but I still find that horror films have the most immediacy for me.

18) I haven’t seen any Bert I Gordon movies outside of Mystery Science Theater 3000, so I’ll refrain from answering.

19) The Innocents, Raw Meat and The Loved Ones (2009.)

20) No. The Human Centipede can eat poo for all I care.

21) The Human Centipede 2.

22) Since I saw it recently, Martha Marcy May Marlene. It’s a psychological drama, but it’s unnerving and made me feel ashamed to be a man.

23) Whomever Dennis likes more.

24) Although this doesn’t relate to a horror film, I remember that my dad once reprimanded me because I tried to watch In Cold Blood on cable by claiming that I like to watch people being cruel to each other. I just changed the channel, but what I should’ve said is “it’s only a movie, dad.” (In fact, there are many times in which I still do want to say that to my dad.)

25) Mark Kermode and Dennis Cozzalio. (Now where can I pick up my Waylon Smithers Award for Best Sycophant?)

26) Again, not a horror movie per se, but Shelley Winters tied to a car underwater in The Night of the Hunter haunted me when I was 11 and still haunts me to this day. Also, there’s an image during the climax of The Innocents that still gets me.

27) Watching Jaws at home and for the first time with my family when I was 12. My older sister Julie freaked-out during the movie and I’ve rarely seen anyone react to a movie like that since.

28) Personally, I think Let the Right One In because it demonstrates that horror films can still be transcendent. But culturally, I have to say Scream. The former-- in an outward, self-conscious and entertaining sense-- epitomizes the sleek derivativeness that permeates current mainstream horror films. In other words: most big horror films are just Scream but they won’t admit it to themselves.

29) Darkness.

30) The People Under the Stairs, The Horror of Dracula, the original The Hills Have Eyes, Murders in the Rue Morgue and Werewolf of London.

Jack and Jill said...

I, too, am late to the party, and decided to post my answers at my own blog. It's beyond in-depth. There are pictures and trailers and anecdotes...oh my. Check it out at

http://frisky916cpl.blogspot.com/2011/10/dr-anton-phibes-abominably-erudite.html

if you're so inclined.

-Jack

Steven Smyth said...

Very late to the party. I'm posting on my blog here:

http;//stevesmyth.net

Thanks Dennis, good as always.

Anonymous said...

Dig the quiz but it won't let me post my comments. It keeps saying "Your HTML cannot be accepted: Must be at most 4,096 characters" GAH!

Dennis Cozzalio said...

Anonymous: Gah! I feel your pain/frustration/annoyance. A couple of years ago Blogger instituted a 4,096-character limit on comments. It will accept your comments post as long as it is under 4,096 characters. So what people usually do is just break the post up into two or three chunks, depending on how long your answers are. I hope you'll do this, because I'm always interested to see more answers!

David Robson, Proprietor, House of Sparrows said...

Just wrapped up in time for tonight! It's here. Marvelous questions - thank you!

Jeff Gee said...

Just under the wire with 3 hours of Halloween remaining in this time zone. I posted my answers on my blog, too, HERE. PREVIEW: Almost went for Grayson Hall because I snuck into Night of the Iguana when I was 9, under the impression it was a giant iguana movie. But Joan it is.

vw: werseto. Human by day... Seto by night...

Dennis Cozzalio said...

David, Jeff: Your timeliness is impressive and appreciated! I tried to stay up late last night to finish mine, but I couldn't, and work was just too demanding today. So I'm gonna be late to my own party and post my answers late tonight-- if I don't get torn up by angry trick-or-treaters first!

The Mysterious Ad[ri.an B)e;ta]m.a.x. said...

1) Favorite Vincent Price/American International Pictures release.

Season of the Witch

2) What horror classic (or non-classic) that has not yet been remade would you like to see upgraded for modern audiences?

Paranormal Activity

3) Jonathan Frid or Thayer David?

Jonathan Frakes

4) Name the one horror movie you need to see that has so far eluded you.

Scary Movie 4

5) Favorite film director most closely associated with the horror genre.

Brett Ratner

6) Ingrid Pitt or Barbara Steele?

Denise Richards

7) Favorite 50’s sci-fi/horror creature.

Milton Berle

8) Favorite/best sequel to an established horror classic.

Was there a sequel to Ravenous?

9) Name a sequel in a horror series which clearly signaled that the once-vital franchise had run out of gas.

Wrong Turn 4. But before then it was masterful.

10) John Carradine or Lon Chaney Jr.?

John Carradine fo' sure. Bluebeard, countless others!

11) What was the last horror movie you saw in a theater? On DVD or Blu-ray?

Half of The Blob with Steven McQueen.

12) Best foreign-language fiend/monster.

Jean-Luc Godard

13) Favorite Mario Bava movie.

I gave Black Sunday 3 stars, and everything else 2 stars, including Planet of the Vampires which should have been awesome but kind of sucked.

14) Favorite horror actor and actress.

Kari Wuhrer and Rose McGowan and Liev Schreiber—can someone please make a horror movie featuring his character from Taking Woodstock?

The Mysterious Ad[ri.an B)e;ta]m.a.x. said...

15) Name a great horror director’s least effective movie.

Declan O'Brien's Wrong Turn 4. Such a drop from Wrong Turn 3 to 4. What was he thinking?!

16) Grayson Hall or Joan Bennett?

Grace Jones

17) When did you realize that you were a fan of the horror genre? And if you’re not, when did you realize you weren’t?

I'm not and when I realized they rarely have artistic value because they're adolescent fanboy fantasizing.

18) Favorite Bert I. Gordon (B.I.G.) movie.

OK, you really got me on this one. Never heard of this dude.

19) Name an obscure horror favorite that you wish more people knew about.

Existenz

20) The Human Centipede-- yes or no?

Haven't seen it, but I'm sure it's awesome.

21) And while we’re in the neighborhood, is there a horror film you can think of that you felt “went too far”?

Isn't it all about going too far, you sickos?!

22) Name a film that is technically outside the horror genre that you might still feel comfortable describing as a horror film.

Curse of the Jade Scorpion. Chilling.

23) Lara Parker or Kathryn Leigh Scott?

Campbell Scott and Sarah Jessica Parker. Seriously, am I right? Did I solve your Soduki?

24) If you’re a horror fan, at some point in your past your dad, grandmother, teacher or some other disgusted figure of authority probably wagged her/his finger at you and said, “Why do you insist on reading/watching all this morbid monster/horror junk?” How did you reply? And if that reply fell short somehow, how would you have liked to have replied?

Holy shit you need a new hobby.

25) Name the critic or Web site you most enjoy reading on the subject of the horror genre.

Only Sergio!

26) Most frightening image you’ve ever taken away from a horror movie.

Despite all my criticisms, the ending of Wrong Turn 4 is everlasting.

27) Your favorite memory associated with watching a horror movie.

This one time I got inspired to go out and kill kittens afterwards.

28) What would you say is the most important/significant horror movie of the past 20 years (1992-2012)? Why?

WR: Mysteries of the Organism. :-)

29) Favorite Dr. Phibes curse (from either film).

Lost me again. No idea, don't watch those films.

30) You are programming an all-night Halloween horror-thon for your favorite old movie palace. What five movies make up your schedule?

The Shining. Videodrome. Halloween. Dead Ringers. And the '80s Hong Kong movie with vampires and a scene where everyone is in slow-motion due to some gas, that my friend's grandma was watching back in 1989.

Thom McGregor said...

I am neither a horror fan nor expert, nor do I even possess a fair-to-middling memory at this point in my life, but as I'm the proud Mrs. SLIFR, I felt like supporting my hubby by taking the quiz. Fair notice: I don't know many of these names/movie titles at all.

1) Favorite Vincent Price/American International Pictures release.
Looking at IMDb, I can't tell which films of his are AIP, and I may not have seen any, so I have to admit I know Mr. Price and am fond of him mostly from a variety of TV appearances he made in my childhood. So I'll have to say the episode of "Ellery Queen" he was in in 1976 'cause I loved that show as a kid. (I know, mystery,not horror, but what can I do?)
2) What horror classic (or non-classic) that has not yet been remade would you like to see upgraded for modern audiences?
A Chucky movie for the current young horror-loving generation.
3) Jonathan Frid or Thayer David?
Frid. I did like him in Dark Shadows. However, I don't know who the other guy is, so... not really fair to him, I guess.
4) Name the one horror movie you need to see that has so far eluded you.
According to Dennis, all of them.
5) Favorite film director most closely associated with the horror genre.
Cronenberg. Hitchcock.
6) Ingrid Pitt or Barbara Steele?
Don't know either.
7) Favorite 50’s sci-fi/horror creature.
Them!
8) Favorite/best sequel to an established horror classic.
Aliens.
9) Name a sequel in a horror series which clearly signaled that the once-vital franchise had run out of gas.
Jaws 3D.
10) John Carradine or Lon Chaney Jr.? Carradine for overacting, Chaney for carrying heavy furniture.
11) What was the last horror movie you saw in a theater? On DVD or Blu-ray?
I Know What You Did Last Summer. Honestly.
12) Best foreign-language fiend/monster.
Godzilla.
13) Favorite Mario Bava movie.
Never seen one, I don't think.
14) Favorite horror actor and actress.
Actress: Sigourney Weaver, if the Alien movies count. Jodie Foster if Silence of the Lambs alone counts. Can't think of an actor.
15) Name a great horror director’s least effective movie.
According to Dennis, The Wrong Man.
16) Grayson Hall or Joan Bennett?
Don't know either.
17) When did you realize that you were a fan of the horror genre? And if you’re not, when did you realize you weren’t?
I realized I wasn't early on. I liked some horror-type films, but don't respond to gore very well. Then after having kids, can't even stand to be creeped out.
18) Favorite Bert I. Gordon (B.I.G.) movie.
Sorry. Once again, don't know him.
19) Name an obscure horror favorite that you wish more people knew about.
I'm also going with Existenz. I barely know the famous movies.
20) The Human Centipede-- yes or no?
Definitely no. Don't even go near there.
21) And while we’re in the neighborhood, is there a horror film you can think of that you felt “went too far”?
90% of horror films do. I prefer either the occasional scare mixed with laughs and tension like "Jaws" or just atmospherics.

Thom McGregor said...

22) Name a film that is technically outside the horror genre that you might still feel comfortable describing as a horror film.
"The Room." Just saw it and honestly felt like I was trapped on another world where everyone around me was insane or acting inexplicably.
23) Lara Parker or Kathryn Leigh Scott?
Sorry! Don't know either.
24) If you’re a horror fan, at some point in your past your dad, grandmother, teacher or some other disgusted figure of authority probably wagged her/his finger at you and said, “Why do you insist on reading/watching all this morbid monster/horror junk?” How did you reply? And if that reply fell short somehow, how would you have liked to have replied?
I sometimes have this reaction to Dennis's film viewing habits, especially when I walk up to the front door and hear some pour soul on our speaker system screaming their lungs out. But mostly I just accept that he likes to be scared and enjoys the good movies that happen to be scary. Me, I find everyday life more than frightening enough.
25) Name the critic or Web site you most enjoy reading on the subject of the horror genre.
SLIFR.
26) Most frightening image you’ve ever taken away from a horror movie.
Wait! I think there was a Vincent Price movie I saw on TV as a child where he was the only person left alive on Earth. I think zombies or monsters came after him later, but that didn't bother me as much as the scenes where the wind scattered leaves around empty buildings and houses and knowing he was the only one left. I believe that made me cry in horror. So if that's an AIP movie, that would also be my fave VP AIP movie. Also, the weird people-in-animal masks tableaus Shelly Duvall saw in the rooms in The Shining.
27) Your favorite memory associated with watching a horror movie.
Jaws with my sisters and my mother in the very back row in a chintzy Glendale CA theater, being so scared and excited and happy and terrified. I'd never seen a movie like that before, and Jaws would be my movie obsession... at least for 2 more years, then Star Wars came along. But that's another story.
28) What would you say is the most important/significant horror movie of the past 20 years (1992-2012)? Why?
Silence of the Lambs was 1991, so I don't know.
29) Favorite Dr. Phibes curse (from either film).
Never seen a Phibes curse.
30) You are programming an all-night Halloween horror-thon for your favorite old movie palace. What five movies make up your schedule?
Jaws
Alien
Psycho
Silence of the Lambs
The Shining
Strangely enough, I think these days I could only handle Jaws and Psycho.
Sincerely, Thom McGregor (Mrs. SLIFR)

Thom McGregor said...

That would be "poor soul."