Friday, March 08, 2013

MISS JEAN BRODIE’S MODESTLY MAGNIFICENT, MATRIARCHALLY MANIPULATIVE SPRINGTIME-FOR-MUSSOLINI MOVIE QUIZ




Yes, fair pupils, it’s time once again break out the books and study aids, loosen your fingers, sharpen your #2s and settle into your seats, for the bell has rung and work will soon begin on a brand new SLIFR movie quiz. For this edition we’ve called on that distinguished lady of letters and professed expert on the Romantic Fascists, Miss Jean Brodie, who heads the Interpersonal Relationship Studies department here at SLIFR U. Miss Brodie has spared no effort (no expense required, thankfully, as the school coffers are too depleted to provide production value along with good questions) to concoct a genuine corker of a questionnaire which is sure to divide allegiances and facilitate shocking betrayals of confidence over accusations of cheating and excessive IMDb referencing, even if you’re taking the test alone. (She’s just that good at stirring up guilt.)

Miss Brodie would like to remind all participants that there are no correct answers, only thoughtful ones, though she reserves the right to arch an eyebrow in quizzical disbelief or outright cynicism if she deems your responses lazy, insufficiently elaborate or otherwise lacking in the standard of thoroughness and honor which is the hallmark of study amongst these hallowed halls. So, no pressure, only a reminder that the more windy and discursive answers are the ones most favored— clipped, blunt, one or two-word answers should be reserved for Professor Walter Hill’s upcoming class on Macho Codes and Aesthetics.  

Also, and this is very important, please be sure, when answering in the comments thread below, to cut and paste the questions along with your answers so that Our Dear Readers, to say nothing of poor Miss Brodie, don’t have to continually scroll up and down the page to reference the context of the disembodied answers you’ve taken such time and care to craft.

And be motivated not only by the desire to rise to the occasion of this momentous quiz, but also by the rumor that Miss Brodie has offered to bestow upon some lucky student, whose answers delight her most, one of the instructor’s prized portraits of Benito Mussolini as a show of appreciation. (There is also a rumor that the portrait will be signed, though whether by Miss Brodie or His Excellency Il Duce it is unclear.)

There you have it. Now, off you go. Do well. Pencils up, and begin!



************************************

       1)      The classic movie moment everyone loves except me is:
       
       2)      Favorite line of dialogue from a film noir
       
       3)      Second favorite Hal Ashby film
       
       4)      Describe the moment when you first realized movies were directed as opposed to simply pieced together anonymously. *
       
       5)      Favorite film book
       
       6)      Diana Sands or Vonetta McGee?
       
       7)      Most egregious gap in your viewing of films made in the past 10 years
       
       8)      Favorite line of dialogue from a comedy
       
       9)      Second favorite Lloyd Bacon film
       
       10)   Richard Burton or Roger Livesey?
       
       11)   Is there a movie you staunchly refuse to consider seeing? If so, why?
       
       12)   Favorite filmmaker collaboration
       
       13)   Most recently viewed movie on DVD/Blu-ray/theatrical?
       
       14)   Favorite line of dialogue from a horror movie
        
       15)   Second favorite Oliver Stone film
       
       16)   Eva Mendes or Raquel Welch?
       
       17)   Favorite religious satire
       
       18)   Best Internet movie argument? (question contributed by Tom Block)
       
       19)   Most pointless Internet movie argument? (question contributed by Tom Block) 
       
       20)   Charles McGraw or Robert Ryan?
         
       21)   Favorite line of dialogue from a western
       
       22)   Second favorite Roy Del Ruth film
       
       23)   Relatively unknown film or filmmaker you’d most eagerly proselytize for
       
       24)   Ewan McGregor or Gerard Butler?
       
       25)   Is there such a thing as a perfect movie?
       
       26)   Favorite movie location you’ve most recently had the occasion to actually visit *
       
       27)   Second favorite Delmer Daves film
        
       28)   Name the one DVD commentary you wish you could hear that, for whatever reason, doesn't actually exist *
       
       29)   Gloria Grahame or Marie Windsor?
       
       30)   Name a filmmaker who never really lived up to the potential suggested by their early acclaim or success
       
       31)   Is there a movie-based disagreement serious enough that it might cause you to reevaluate the  basis of a romantic relationship or a friendship? *

 * a classic or, if you must, recycled question from quizzes past that Miss Brodie thought might be interesting to revisit

**************************************

80 comments:

Scott Nye said...

1) The classic movie moment everyone loves except me is:

Partially for its timeliness, I’ll go with “There’s no place like home,” from The Wizard of Oz. Not the biggest fan of the movie on the whole.

2) Favorite line of dialogue from a film noir

Tie!

“My, my, my! Such a lot of guns around town and so few brains! You know, you're the second guy I've met today that seems to think a gat in the hand means the world by the tail.” - Philip Marlowe, The Big Sleep

Yelburton - “After you've worked with a man a certain length of time, you come to know his habits, his values - you come to know him - and either he's the kind who chases after women or he isn't.”
Gittes - “Mulwray isn't?”
Yelburton - “He never even kids about it.”
Gittes - “Well, maybe he takes it very seriously.”
-Chinatown

3) Second favorite Hal Ashby film

Shampoo

4) Describe the moment when you first realized movies were directed as opposed to simply pieced together anonymously.

Hmmmm...probably O Brother, Where Art Thou?, which my mom took my brother and I to against our objections, and proved to be a pretty eye-opening experience.

5) Favorite film book

Cinephilia and History, or The Wind in the Trees by Christian Keathley

6) Diana Sands or Vonetta McGee

Not really familiar enough with either, so I’ll have to abstain.

7) Most egregious gap in your viewing of films made in the past 10 years

4 Months, 3 Weeks, & 2 Days

8) Favorite line of dialogue from a comedy

“To lose one parent, Mr. Worthing, may be regarded as a misfortune. To lose both looks like carelessness.” - Lady Bracknell, The Importance of Being Earnest

9) Second favorite Lloyd Bacon film

42nd Street

10) Richard Burton or Roger Livesey

Much love to Burton, but Livesey by far.

11) Is there a movie you staunchly refuse to consider seeing? If so, why?

Pink Flamingos. Saw a few scenes in a class that nearly made me vomit. Which, I know, might be the point, but I’m good.

12) Favorite filmmaker collaboration

Gene Kelly, noted director, starring in Jacques Demy’s The Young Girls of Rochefort.

13) Most recently viewed movie on DVD/Blu-ray/theatrical?

Gonna go ahead and do all three...Dames (1934)/Onibaba/The Nutty Professor

14) Favorite line of dialogue from a horror movie

I've got nothing here. I do like the way Mitchum says "Chillllldren!" in The Night of the Hunter, though.

15) Second favorite Oliver Stone film

JFK

16) Eva Mendes or Raquel Welch

Mendes

Scott Nye said...

17) Favorite religious satire

The Loved One (1965). Not precisely religious, but, eh, kinda!

18) Best Internet movie argument? (question contributed by Tom Block)

The relative merits of Christopher Nolan’s blockbuster films, and by extension the current state of White Elephant Art.

19) Most pointless Internet movie argument? (question contributed by Tom Block)

“The death of film criticism.” Blogs like this, and the discussion they spur, prove that’s impossible.

20) Charles McGraw or Robert Ryan

Ryan for sure, one of the most dangerous film presences.

21) Favorite line of dialogue from a western

“You boys gotta make up your minds if you want to get your cookies. Cause if you want to get your cookies, I've got girls up here that'll do more tricks than a goddamn monkey on a hundred yards of grapevine.” - John McCabe, McCabe and Mrs. Miller

22) Second favorite Roy Del Ruth film

Taxi!

23) Relatively unknown Film or filmmaker you’d most eagerly proselytize for

Man...gonna go with Archie Mayo’s It's Love I'm After

24) Ewan McGregor or Gerard Butler

McGregor, but Butler’s an undertapped resource.

25) Is there such a thing as a perfect movie?

Sure, but definitions vary. It usually implies that the director (or whoever) got exactly what he/she wanted onscreen, and what resulted is good in every regard. But cinema is much more volatile than that. Unintended happenstances are part of the charm, and what may look like an imperfection could enhance the movie, making it more perfect. The first example that comes to mind is the story (which might not actually be true, but the spirit speaks to my point) of the last shot in The Last Temptation of Christ, in which some camera problem causes causes a white-out at exactly the moment Jesus dies.

Anyway, as long as Casablanca exists, it’d be hard for me to say otherwise.

26) Favorite movie location you’ve most recently had the occasion to actually visit

The Batcave!

27) Second favorite Delmer Daves film

3:10 to Yuma

28) Name the one DVD commentary you wish you could hear

As in an imagined commentary? If so, Howard Hawks on anything.

29) Gloria Grahame or Marie Windsor

Grahame all the way.

30) Name a filmmaker who never really lived up to the potential suggested by their early acclaim or success

Catherine Hardwicke. I liked Thirteen and Lords of Dogtown an awful lot, but boy, ever since then...

31) Is there a movie-based disagreement serious enough that it might cause you to reevaluate the basis of a romantic relationship or a friendship?

If they disliked Trouble in Paradise, that’s about the closest I’d come. Certainly in a romantic relationship, but even a friendship that’s largely based around movies would be called into question.

Simon Abrams, bitch said...

1)The classic movie moment everyone loves except me is:

Abstain.

2)Favorite line of dialogue from a film noir: "I was born when she kissed me. I died when she left me. I lived a few weeks while she loved me."

3)Second favorite Hal Ashby film: HAROLD AND MAUDE. BEING THERE is #1.

4)Describe the moment when you first realized movies were directed as opposed to simply pieced together anonymously:
BRAZIL director's cut at age 13 or 14. Was pretty blown away.

5)Favorite film book: At the moment, Richard Brody's EVERYTHING IS CINEMA.

6)Diana Sands or Vonetta McGee: Abstain.

7) Most egregious gap in your viewing of films made in the past 10 years: probably documentaries.

8)Favorite line of dialogue from a comedy: "You mean the movie lied?!"

9)Second favorite Lloyd Bacon film: Abstain.

10)Richard Burton or Roger Livesey: Abstain.

11)Is there a movie you staunchly refuse to consider seeing? If so, why? Not off-hand, no.

12)Favorite filmmaker collaboration: Sammo Hung and Jackie Chan.

13) Most recently viewed movie on DVD/Blu-ray/theatrical? LEPRECHAUN.

14)Favorite line of dialogue from a horror movie: "Send more cops."

15)Second favorite Oliver Stone film: Abstain.

16)Eva Mendes or Raquel Welch: I just saw Eva Mendes in THE PLACE BEYOND THE PINES, where she's introduced in a tank top where her nipples are clearly visibile under her shirt. It gave me feelings. Anyway, Raquel Welch.

17)Favorite religious satire: Can I cheat and say THE RULING CLASS? THE MAGIC CHRISTIAN? IN GOD WE TRU$T? Ok, fine, look, I abstain.

18)Best Internet movie argument: HAHAHA, abstain.

19)Most pointless Internet movie argument: nuh uh.

20)Charles McGraw or Robert Ryan: ROBERT RYAN, GOD DAMN IT.

21)Favorite line of dialogue from a western: "I used to believe in many things, all of it! Now, I believe only in dynamite."

22)Second favorite Roy Del Ruth film: Abbystain.

23)Relatively unknown Film or filmmaker you’d most eagerly proselytize for: Il-Gon Song.

24)Ewan McGregor or Gerard Butler: McGregor, c'mon now.

25)Is there such a thing as a perfect movie: if you make it, it will come. But seriously, no.

26)Favorite movie location you’ve most recently had the occasion to actually visit: EXORCIST steps!

27)Second favorite Delmer Daves film: Noooooo

28)Name the one DVD commentary you wish you could hear that, for whatever reason, doesn't actually exist: Chester Novell Turner on BLACK DEVIL DOLL FROM HELL. Because that dude is DEAD.

29)Gloria Grahame or Marie Windsor: Gloria.

30)Name a filmmaker who never really lived up to the potential suggested by their early acclaim or success: M. Night Shymalan!

31)Is there a movie-based disagreement serious enough that it might cause you to reevaluate the basis of a romantic relationship or a friendship: TEMPLE OF DOOM, probably.

xterminal said...

As seen at http://vareverta.wordpress.com/2013/03/08/brodie-we-dont-need-no-stinkin-brodie/...

1) The classic movie moment everyone loves except me is:
The entire movie Dr. Strangelove, but the most gratuitous, unfunny moment that everyone loves and I despise is Slim Pickens riding the bomb like a bronco. Such sublime subtlety, there.

2) Favorite line of dialogue from a film noir
“Would you like me to tell you the story of right-hand, left-hand…?” (And the following monologue, natch)

3) Second favorite Hal Ashby film
As a director? Being There.

4) Describe the moment when you first realized movies were directed as opposed to simply pieced together anonymously. *
I’m not sure I ever thought the latter. The first time I actually noticed a directorial style and started hunting down movies by “this one guy” because I thought he was awesome was upon seeing Arthur Penn’s Four Friends (a movie only I, out of my circle of friends, could abide).

5) Favorite film book
Geoff Dyer’s Zona: A Book About a Movie About a Journey to a Room, which topped by Best Reads of 2012 list.

6) Diana Sands or Vonetta McGee
McGee wins the photo thanks to popping up in Repo Man.

7) Most egregious gap in your viewing of films made in the past 10 years
I am usually a year or two behind, and so when Oscar season rolls around, the chances that I have seen any of the nominees is slim to none.

8) Favorite line of dialogue from a comedy
“You see, man, there’s this… lattice of coincidence…”

9) Second favorite Lloyd Bacon film
I’ve only seen one. Coincidentally, I republished my review of it here last week: 50 Million Frenchmen.

10) Richard Burton or Roger Livesey
Burton.

11) Is there a movie you staunchly refuse to consider seeing? If so, why?
If it stars Adam Sandler, Jim Carrey, Chris Farley, or a handful of other “comics” I can’t abide, it goes on the trash heap before assaulting my eyes. This is also true of dramas starring same (suffering through Man on the Moon was torturous).

12) Favorite filmmaker collaboration
Lucky McKee and Trygve Allister Diesen’s Red. Unless anthology films count, in which cae it’s edged out by Rampo Noir.

13) Most recently viewed movie on DVD/Blu-ray/theatrical?
Vale Abraão / Fright Night (the 1985 original, not the recent remake).

14) Favorite line of dialogue from a horror movie
“Your best hope would be to depersonalize what follows and not look upon me as a foe or yourself as a victim.”

15) Second favorite Oliver Stone film
Any Given Sunday

16) Eva Mendes or Raquel Welch
Mendes, with the understanding that I haven’t seen a lot of the “you were thinking what when you accepted that role?” stuff of hers.

xterminal said...

17) Favorite religious satire
In God We Tru$t

18) Best Internet movie argument? (question contributed by Tom Block)
“You wouldn’t download a bear…”

19) Most pointless Internet movie argument? (question contributed by Tom Block)
“Is Jar Jar Binks racist?”

20) Charles McGraw or Robert Ryan
McGraw by three lengths.

21) Favorite line of dialogue from a western
“Hell, I even thought I was dead till I found out I was just in Nebraska.”

22) Second favorite Roy Del Ruth film
Only seen two. Bureau of Missing Persons.

23) Relatively unknown Film or filmmaker you’d most eagerly proselytize for
I do, for Radha Baharadwaj. She needs to start making movies again.

24) Ewan McGregor or Gerard Butler
Both are generally loathsome, but Butler actually showed acting chops in Coriolanus, something McGregor has yet to do.

25) Is there such a thing as a perfect movie?
Anyone who can watch before Night Falls and still ask that question doesn’t have a heart.

26) Favorite movie location you’ve most recently had the occasion to actually visit *
I drive through half the location shots of The Avengers and I, Alex Cross on my way to work every damn day, and I cursed every cast and crew member of both for six damn months because of it.

27) Second favorite Delmer Daves film
Only seen 3:10 to Yuma.

28) Name the one DVD commentary you wish you could hear that, for whatever reason, doesn’t actually exist
It may exist–the movie has never been released on DVD outside Japan–but I would love to hear a commentary track for Gaichu from Akihiko Shiota, Eihi Shiina, and Aoi Miyazaki.

29) Gloria Grahame or Marie Windsor
Windsor. ‘Salem’s Lot cred FTW.

30) Name a filmmaker who never really lived up to the potential suggested by their early acclaim or success
Vin Diesel. That the guy who delivered that Raisin in the Sun monologue at the end of Multi-Facial got typecast as a brainless action star kills me.
31) Is there a movie-based disagreement serious enough that it might cause you to reevaluate the basis of a romantic relationship or a friendship? *
Probably, but I haven’t run across it yet.

Dave Stewart said...

1) The classic movie moment everyone loves except me is:
When John Cusack holds the ghettoblaster up to Ione Skye’s window in “Say Anything…”.

2) Favorite line of dialogue from a film noir
“I steal…” from “I am a Fugitive from a Chain Gang”.

3) Second favorite Hal Ashby film
“Harold and Maude.

4) Describe the moment when you first realized movies were directed as opposed to simply pieced together anonymously.
I can’t recover the exact moment, but I know it came from reading Famous Monsters of Filmland when I was a Monster Kid.

5) Favorite Film Book
Hitchcock/Truffaut: The Definitive Study of Alfred Hitchcock by François Truffaut

6) Diana Sands or Vonetta McGee
McGee, please.

7) Most egregious gap in your viewing of films made in the past 10 years
Probably some Korean Cinema.

8) Favorite line of dialogue from a comedy
“I wouldn't suck your lousy dick if I was suffocating and there was oxygen in your balls! “ from John Waters’ “Female Trouble”.

9) Second favorite Lloyd Bacon film
I don’t even have a favourite Lloyd Bacon film.

10) Richard Burton or Roger Livesey
Burton.

11) Is there a movie you staunchly refuse to consider seeing? If so, why?
There are a ton of them, and the reasons are always the same: It won’t engage me, and there are so many movies out there that actually I want to see.

12) Favorite filmmaker collaboration
Hitchcock and Dali on “Spellbound”?

13) Most recently viewed movie on DVD/Blu-ray/theatrical?
DVD: Touch of Satan / Blu: VHS / Theatre: Hitchcock

14) Favorite line of dialogue from a horror movie
"I live in the weak and the wounded, Doc." from “Session 9”, but it needs to be in context.

15) Second favorite Oliver Stone film
Salvador.

16) Eva Mendes or Raquel Welch
Raquel Welch for “One Million Years B.C.”, “Kansas City Bomber”, and “Myra Breckinrdige”.

17) Favorite religious satire
Monty Python’s Life of Brian – “How shall we fuck off, oh Lord?”

18) Best Internet movie argument? (question contributed by Tom Block)
Most of them are too “immediate” and anonymous to have any validity.

19) Most pointless Internet movie argument? (question contributed by Tom Block)
See above.

20) Charles McGraw or Robert Ryan
McGraw was in “The Birds”!

21) Favorite line of dialogue from a western
"Shane ... Shane ... Come Back!"

22) Second favorite Roy Del Ruth film
Um… I’ve only ever seen “The Alligator People”.

23) Relatively unknown Film or filmmaker you’d most eagerly proselytize for
Doris Wishman

24) Ewan McGregor or Gerard Butler
Ewan McGregor because he makes better movies.

25) Is there such a thing as a perfect movie?
Yes, and there are plenty of them.

26) Favorite movie location you’ve most recently had the occasion to actually visit *
I live where the Daniel Day Lewis movie “Rose and the Snake” was filmed.

27) Second favorite Delmer Daves film
I have seen exactly zero of the gentleman’s output.

28) Name the one DVD commentary you wish you could hear
Alfred Hitchcock on “Psycho”.

29) Gloria Grahame or Marie Windsor
Grahame and her wonderful coffee-scarred face.

30) Name a filmmaker who never really lived up to the potential suggested by their early acclaim or success
Sam Raimi.

31) Is there a movie-based disagreement serious enough that it might cause you to reevaluate the basis of a romantic relationship or a friendship?
Not based on a movie or two, and chances are that I wouldn’t be close friends with someone whose movie taste I found that reprehensible.

leo86 said...

1) The classic movie moment everyone loves except me is:
WHEN HARRY MET SALLY: the orgasm scene in the diner
2) Favorite line of dialogue from a film noir
"If I gotta die, I want to die last." - Mitchum in OUT OF THE PAST

3) Second favorite Hal Ashby film
BOUND FOR GLORY

4) Describe the moment when you first realized movies were directed as opposed to simply pieced together anonymously. *
Watching Kong's entrance in KING KONG (1933) on TV and noticing the difference in the way Kong looked in long shot (animated) and up close (giant face model)

5) Favorite film book
Agee on Film

6) Diana Sands or Vonetta McGee
Vonetta McGee

7) Most egregious gap in your viewing of films made in the past 10 years
The Twillight movies

8) Favorite line of dialogue from a comedy
W.C. Fields, THE BANK DICK: "Don't be a luddy ruddy, don't be a jabbernowl, don't be a mooncalf. You're none of those, are you?"

9) Second favorite Lloyd Bacon film
ACTION IN THE NORTH ATLANTIC
10) Richard Burton or Roger Livesey
Richard Burton
11) Is there a movie you staunchly refuse to consider seeing? If so, why?
TWILIGHT Part 1 - life is too short

12) Favorite filmmaker collaboration
Director Lau Kar Leung and star Gordon Liu

13) Most recently viewed movie on DVD/Blu-ray/theatrical?
SUMMER WARS

14) Favorite line of dialogue from a horror movie
Willie Best in THE GHOST BREAKERS: "If you IS a ghost, this ain't gonna do me no good. If you AIN'T a ghost this ain't gonna do YOU no good."
15) Second favorite Oliver Stone film
HEAVEN AND EARTH
16) Eva Mendes or Raquel Welch
Raquel Welch
17) Favorite religious satire
LIFE OF BRIAN
18) Best Internet movie argument? (question contributed by Tom Block)
The virtues of Quentin Tarantino
19) Most pointless Internet movie argument? (question contributed by Tom Block)
Marvel movies vs. DC
20) Charles McGraw or Robert Ryan
Robert Ryan
21) Favorite line of dialogue from a western
"How'd you like to kiss my sister's black cat's ass?" (THE WILD BUNCH)
22) Second favorite Roy Del Ruth film
PHANTOM OF THE RUE MORGUE
23) Relatively unknown Film or filmmaker you’d most eagerly proselytize for
Rowland Brown

24) Ewan McGregor or Gerard Butler
Gerard Butler
25) Is there such a thing as a perfect movie?
Yes, a great kung fu movie.
26) Favorite movie location you’ve most recently had the occasion to actually visit *
The Empire State Building

27) Second favorite Delmer Daves film
SUSAN SLADE
28) Name the one DVD commentary you wish you could hear that, for whatever reason, doesn't actually exist
David O. Selznick, GONE WITH THE WIND

29) Gloria Grahame or Marie Windsor
Marie Windsor
30) Name a filmmaker who never really lived up to the potential suggested by their early acclaim or success
Michael Cimino

31) Is there a movie-based disagreement serious enough that it might cause you to reevaluate the basis of a romantic relationship or a friendship? *
Yes, if they don't like Hayao Miyazaki, we're through.

estienne64 said...

1. The classic movie moment everyone loves except me is:
That 'bigger boat' line from Jaws.

2. Favorite line of dialogue from a film noir
Probably The Big Sleep: 'She tried to sit in my lap while I was standing up.'

3. Second favorite Hal Ashby film
Being There, after Harold and Maude.

4. Describe the moment when you first realized movies were directed as opposed to simply pieced together anonymously.
Early on in the colour section of The Wizard of Oz.

5. Favorite film book
Classics of the Silent Screen by Joe Franklin.

6. Diana Sands or Vonetta McGee
Don't know the first, get the second mixed up with Lonette McKee.

7. Most egregious gap in your viewing of films made in the past 10 years
Apichatpong Weerasethakul remains a mystery.

8. Favorite line of dialogue from a comedy
From Way Out West. Stan: 'Well shut my mouth! I'm from the south too.' Olly: 'South of what, sir?' Stan: 'South of London.'

9. Second favorite Lloyd Bacon film
Never knowingly seen one, let alone two.

10. Richard Burton or Roger Livesey
Livesey. (Big Powell & Pressburger fan.)

11. Is there a movie you staunchly refuse to consider seeing? If so, why?
ET. Too old now.

12. Favorite filmmaker collaboration
Michael Winterbottom and Steve Coogan? (Better together than apart, anyway.)

13. Most recently viewed movie on DVD/Blu-ray/theatrical?
Switch. Not much cop, to be honest.

14. Favorite line of dialogue from a horror movie
'Free! Free at last!' (Frederic March as Mr Hyde).

15. Second favorite Oliver Stone film
JFK. A long way behind Salvador, but it does at least have Donald Sutherland's monologue and Kevin Bacon's killer line: 'You don't know shit, 'cause you've never been fucked in the ass.'

16. Eva Mendes or Raquel Welch
Raquel all the way. But I like your thinking.

17. Favorite religious satire
Bunuel's The Milky Way.

20. Charles McGraw or Robert Ryan
This one doesn't seem fair. McGraw's fine, but Ryan's unbeatable.

21. Favorite line of dialogue from a western
Unforgiven: 'I've killed women and children. I've killed just about everything that walks or crawls at one time or another. And I'm here to kill you, Little Bill...'

22. Second favorite Roy Del Ruth film
It's the Lloyd Bacon question all over again.

23. Relatively unknown Film or filmmaker you’d most eagerly proselytize for
The French director Michel Deville.

24. Ewan McGregor or Gerard Butler
McGregor's charm and 'have a go' attitude mean he just edges it.

25. Is there such a thing as a perfect movie?
I do hope not.

26. Favorite movie location you’ve most recently had the occasion to actually visit
Strasbourg, whose streets I gradually recognised while watching In the City of Sylvia.

27. Second favorite Delmer Daves film
3.10 to Yuma. (Favourite: Dark Passage. Not that brilliant a film, but I'm sucker for all that subjective camera stuff at the start.)

28. Name the one DVD commentary you wish you could hear that, for whatever reason, doesn't actually exist
Jean Renoir on The Rules of the Game.

29. Gloria Grahame or Marie Windsor
Grahame. (This and Q20 make me feel I'm putting the boot into that excellent film The Narrow Margin.)

30. Name a filmmaker who never really lived up to the potential suggested by their early acclaim or success
John Frankenheimer.

31. Is there a movie-based disagreement serious enough that it might cause you to reevaluate the basis of a romantic relationship or a friendship?
Anyone who sincerely believes that Peter's Friends has any redeeming features is unlikely to feature on my Christmas card list.

Anne Thompson said...

1) The classic movie moment everyone loves except me is: "Show me the money" from "Jerry Maguire," a movie that always seemed to be trying too hard.

2) Favorite line of dialogue from a film noir: Sam Fuller in Jean-Luc Godard's "Pierrot le Fou": "Film is like a battleground: it's love, hate, action, violence, death. In one word: emotion."

3) Second favorite Hal Ashby film: "Shampoo."

4) Describe the moment when you first realized movies were directed as opposed to simply pieced together anonymously: Buster Keaton's "Sherlock, Jr."

5) Favorite film book: Molly Haskell's "From Reverence to Rape" is still a relevant must-read.

6) Diana Sands or Vonetta McGee: "L.A. Law"'s sultry McGee.

7) Most egregious gap in your viewing of films made in the past 10 years: I have yet to see a film by indie it-boy Shane Carruth.

8) Favorite line of dialogue from a comedy: "Nobody's perfect!" ("Some Like it Hot")

9) Second favorite Lloyd Bacon film: "I Robot."

10) Richard Burton or Roger Livesey: Livesey is one of the most romantic leading men ever. See Michael Powell's "I Know Where I'm Going."

11) Is there a movie you staunchly refuse to consider seeing? If so, why? Gruesome horror flicks "Texas Chainsaw Massacre," "Nightmare on Elm Street," "Friday the 13th," "Saw," "Hostel." That said, I can handle gross and scary, from "Halloween" and "Dawn of the Dead" to "They Came from Within" and "Walking Dead." They just have to be well-written and directed.

12) Favorite filmmaker collaboration: John McTiernan and Jan DeBont were never as good apart as they were together ("The Hunt for Red October" and "Die Hard"). Same with Peter Bogdanovich and Polly Platt (“The Last Picture Show" and "Paper Moon").

13) Most recently viewed movie on DVD/Blu-ray/theatrical?
Sam Raimi's "Oz the Great and Powerful" at El Capitan on Hollywood Boulevard, complete with organ player.

14) Favorite line of dialogue from a horror movie: "They're coming to get you, Barbara!" from George Romero's classic "Night of the Living Dead." Indeed.

15) Second favorite Oliver Stone film: "Nixon."

Anne Thompson said...

16) Eva Mendes or Raquel Welch: Welch is sexy and funny (see Richard Lester's "The Three Musketeers").

17) Favorite religious satire: Kevin Smith's "Dogma."

18) Best Internet movie argument? Between Kevin Smith and his critics on Twitter after Cop Out got slammed.

19) Most pointless Internet movie argument? Whether film criticism is dead.

20) Charles McGraw or Robert Ryan: Craggy, dignified Robert Ryan in "The Wild Bunch" is a thing of beauty.

21) Favorite line of dialogue from a western: "Let's go." ("The Wild Bunch")

22) Second favorite Roy Del Ruth film: "Born to Dance.”

23) Relatively unknown Film or filmmaker you’d most eagerly proselytize for: "The Player" writer Michael Tolkin's "Rapture" tackles religion and the afterlife in a way no one else has.

24) Ewan McGregor or Gerard Butler: McGregor can act, sing, do any genre believably, even romance, and likes to show off his body and penis (see "Pillow Book," "Trainspotting," "Moulin Rouge," "Beginners"). Butler, while handsome and talented, picks badly and lets his inner boob shine through, especially in romances. I’m sure that his penis is smaller.

25) Is there such a thing as a perfect movie? In its time. All movies belong to their time.

26) Favorite movie location you’ve most recently had the occasion to actually visit: I recommend the San Francisco Film Society "Vertigo" tour.

27) Second favorite Delmer Daves film: He wrote "An Affair to Remember," so Bogey/Bacall vehicle "Dark Passage."

28) Name the one DVD commentary you wish you could hear that, for whatever reason, doesn't actually exist: Orson Welles on the making of "Citizen Kane."

29) Gloria Grahame or Marie Windsor: Gloria Grahame, for being a girl who can't say no, among many other things.

30) Name a filmmaker who never really lived up to the potential suggested by their early acclaim or success: What if Welles had finished more movies, been more disciplined, worked within the system?

31) Is there a movie-based disagreement serious enough that it might cause you to reevaluate the basis of a romantic relationship or a friendship? In college I called my boyfriend Peter a "movie moron" for not having seen "2001: A Space Odyssey." He never let me forget it.

Patrick said...

1) The classic movie moment everyone loves except me is: the fake orgasm in When Harry Met Sally. I never bought the character Sally doing this in a public setting - Holly Golightly would before Sally would. And am I the only one who saw the "I'll have what she's having" line coming from a mile away? (And I'm speaking as a guy who say this in the theater on its opening weekend.)

2) Favorite line of dialogue from a film noir: So many great ones, but the one that rises to the surface tonight is this exchange from Narrow Margin: "You make me sick to my stomach." "Well, use your own sink."

3) Second favorite Hal Ashby film: Harold and Maude is in my top ten. Being There is in my top thirty.

4) Describe the moment when you first realized movies were directed as opposed to simply pieced together anonymously: In The Graduate, when Elaine realizes that Ben slept with her mother as the camera slowly brings her into focus. I understood how this was a specific decision the director made to help tell the story, and that he didn't just point the camera and say "action" and "cut."

5) Favorite film book: Cult Movies by Danny Peary. It took forever, but last year I finally tracked down copies of volumes 2 and 3. Woo hoo!

6) Diana Sands or Vonetta McGee: Vonette, for Repo Man. I jumped on that action from day one.

7) Most egregious gap in your viewing of films made in the past 10 years: I haven't seen any Steven Spielberg movies since Catch Me If You Can. I also haven't seen any Sacha Baron Cohen movies. History will vindicate me.

8) Favorite line of dialogue from a comedy: Well, that covers a lot of ground. Say, you cover a lot of ground yourself. You better beat it; I hear they're going to tear you down and put up an office building where you're standing. You can leave in a taxi; if you can't find a taxi, you can leave in a huff. If that's too soon, you can leave in a minute and a huff. You know, you haven't stopped talking since I came in here? You must have been vaccinated with a phonograph needle.

9) Second favorite Lloyd Bacon film: The one he made in 1952.

10) Richard Burton or Roger Livesey: "Roger... I have some terrible news..."

11) Is there a movie you staunchly refuse to consider seeing? If so, why?:

12) Favorite filmmaker collaboration: If this means what I think it means, I'll say Francois Truffaut and Steven Spielberg in Close Encounters.

13) Most recently viewed movie on DVD/Blu-ray/theatrical?: DVD - Simon, starring Alan Arkin. Blu-ray - n/a. Theatrical - Django Unchained.

14) Favorite line of dialogue from a horror movie: "Yeah, they're dead. They're... all messed up." - Sheriff McClelland, Night of the Living Dead

15) Second favorite Oliver Stone film: I guess I'll say JFK. Shout-out to Stone for his cameo in Dave.

Patrick said...

16) Eva Mendes or Raquel Welch: Welch. Back in the day, just saying her name conjured up an image, even to people who'd never seen her act. Say Mendes's name, and millions will say, "Which one is she again?"

17) Favorite religious satire: Moore & Cook's Bedazzled.

18) Best Internet movie argument? (question contributed by Tom Block): Whether or not Deckard is a replicant. It's a debate that's no closer to being resolved now than it was before the internet came along.

19) Most pointless Internet movie argument? (question contributed by Tom Block): What's in the briefcase in Pulp Fiction.

20) Charles McGraw or Robert Ryan: Wow, tough call. Having looked at their records on IMDb, I'll give it to McGraw, only because he played Rick Blaine on TV while Bogart was still alive to see it. Maybe that's what killed him...

21) Favorite line of dialogue from a western: "Let's go home, Debbie."

22) Second favorite Roy Del Ruth film: Pass.

23) Relatively unknown Film or filmmaker you’d most eagerly proselytize for: Melvin Goes to Dinner. Four people talking, with cameos from Jack Black and David Cross, directed by Bob Odenkirk. Last I checked, it's not in Leonard Maltin's guide - which is okay, as it makes me feel like I've got a great secret.

24) Ewan McGregor or Gerard Butler: I think McGregor's made the more interesting career choices, which tips the scales his way.

25) Is there such a thing as a perfect movie?: I suppose it depends on your definition of "perfect." Google "perfect movie rules" (without quotes) for a fairly good definition. As for me, I say Casablanca.

26) Favorite movie location you’ve most recently had the occasion to actually visit: Pass.

27) Second favorite Delmer Daves film: Pass.

28) Name the one DVD commentary you wish you could hear that, for whatever reason, doesn't actually exist: Truman Capote on the original In Cold Blood.

29) Gloria Grahame or Marie Windsor: It's a Wonderful Life or Cat-Woman of the Moon. Sure, that's unfair of me. Nevertheless, Grahame it is.

30) Name a filmmaker who never really lived up to the potential suggested by their early acclaim or success: The easy answer's Kevin Smith, but I'm going with Witchfinder General director Michael Reeves, who quite literally didn't live up to his potential due to his dying at age 25.

31) Is there a movie-based disagreement serious enough that it might cause you to reevaluate the basis of a romantic relationship or a friendship?: No. Personality transcends taste. I will say that if they hate something I love or vice versa, I'll just tease, mock, and constantly remind, like Siskel did with Ebert liking Cop and a Half.

Edward Copeland said...

1) A toughie. I think more of films I feel that I'm a lone dissenter on more than moments. I abstain for now.

2) Many options. I'll just grab this one from Double Indemnity since I heard it again recently. "How could I have known that murder could sometimes smell like honeysuckle?"

3) Being There

4) Probably when I saw the re-release of Jaws in 3rd of 4th grade.

5) For Keeps by Pauline Kael

6) Diana Sands

7) The Big Lebowski

8) Again, way too many options. "It's just like riding a bicycle -- it's just a lot harder to put baseball cards in the spokes."

9) Larceny, Inc.

10. Burton

11. Gus Van Sant's Psycho. It's offensive to me on so many levels and, really, what's the point?

12. Stanley Donen and Gene Kelly on Singin' in the Rain (following great work together on On the Town).

13. Bullhead on DVD

14. "I spent eight years trying to reach him, and then another seven trying to keep him locked up because I realized what was living behind that boy's eyes was purely and simply evil." -- Halloween

15. JFK

16. Raquel Welch

17. The funniest ones actually are the ones that seriously intend to proselytize.

18. Any serious discussion of a film or filmmaker that doesn't degenerate into namecalling or insecure overraactions by people who still don't understand that all opinions about art are subjective and there is no right or wrong.

20. People who declare the end-times are upon us when they think an undeserving film wins the Oscar for best picture because they actually think the Oscar represents the "best" instead of just being a glorified opinion poll. Best example: People still carrying a Crash chip on their shoulder after seven years, calling it things such as "the worst film in cinematic history." They obviously haven't sat through enough shitty movies.

20) Robert Ryan

21) "We've got to start thinking beyond our guns. Those days are closin' fast." -- The Wild Bunch

22) Lady Killer

23) Panic written and directed by Henry Bromell

24) Ewan McGregor

25) No

26) Unfortunately, visiting anything isn't often on my agenda.

27) Broken Arrow

28) Orson Welles on The Magnificent Ambersons/Hitchcock on almost any of his (tie)

29) Gloria Grahame

30) John Singleton

31) If someone seriously defended the idea that Bio-Dome was a funny movie. (Subjectivity is one thing, but there ARE limits.)


Patrick said...

Whoops, forgot #11:

11) Is there a movie you staunchly refuse to consider seeing? If so, why?: I won't see I Spit On Your Grave. That's *not* entertainment.

mike schlesinger said...

1) Classic movie moment everyone loves except me is the restaurant scene in WHEN HARRY MET SALLY. Much funnier in 'ROUND MIDNIGHT.

2) Favorite line of dialogue from a film noir: "He was fulla laughs." "Now he's fulla lead."--TENSION

3) Second favorite Hal Ashby film: BOUND FOR GLORY.

4) Describe the moment when you first realized movies were directed...: I kinda always knew, I think.

5) Favorite film book: OF MICE AND MAGIC. Ground-breaking in its time.

6) Vonetta McGee.

7) Most egregious gap in your viewing of films made in the past 10 years: Probably Korean action films. The few I've seen so disinterested me that I was turned off, but I suppose I should make another attempt.

8) Favorite line of dialogue from a comedy: "Repeat after me--I..." "I..." "Your name..." "Your name..."--BLAZING SADDLES

9) Second favorite Lloyd Bacon film: Seriously? He directed 130 pictures! Oh, very well: LARCENY, INC.

10) Burton or Livesey: Can't do it.

11) Is there a movie you staunchly refuse to consider seeing? If so, why? Anything that insults my intelligence and/or is depressing. Or both. IDENTITY THIEF would be a current choice.

12) Favorite filmmaker collaboration: Hawks/Grant.

13) Most recently viewed movie on DVD/Blu-ray/theatrical: QUARTET.

14) Favorite line of dialogue from a horror movie: "Supernatural, perhaps. Baloney, perhaps not."--THE BLACK CAT.

15) Second favorite Oliver Stone film: U-TURN.

16) Raquel Welch.

17) Favorite religious satire: For now, RED STATE.

18) Best Internet movie argument? I'm not mixing in!

19) Most pointless Internet movie argument? Star Wars vs. Star Trek. Get a grip.

20) Robert Ryan, but it's close.

21) Favorite line of dialogue from a western: "Took you two." "I didn't allow for the wind."--RIO BRAVO

22) Second favorite Roy Del Ruth film: Oy, almost as tough as Bacon--BLESSED EVENT.

23) Relatively unknown film or filmmaker you’d most eagerly proselytize for: Oh, too many...

24) Gerard Butler.

25) Is there such a thing as a perfect movie? No. But many come close.

26) Favorite movie location you’ve most recently had the occasion to actually visit: None that I can think of.

27) Second favorite Delmer Daves film: DARK PASSAGE.

28) Name the one DVD commentary you wish you could hear that, for whatever reason, doesn't actually exist: Sam Fuller's on anything.

29) Gloria Grahame.

30) Name a filmmaker who never really lived up to the potential suggested by their early acclaim or success: Cheating a bit, but--Charles Laughton.

31) Is there a movie-based disagreement serious enough that it might cause you to reevaluate the basis of a romantic relationship or a friendship? No. They're just friggin' movies.

Marilyn Ferdinand said...

My answers are here: http://wp.me/p16NRb-4DX

Jeff Gee said...

1) The classic movie moment everyone loves except me is:
Tom Joad launching into his “…any time there’s a cop beatin’ up a guy, I’ll be there…” monologue in Grapes of Wrath.
2) Favorite line of dialogue from a film noir
Elisha Cook Jr.: Keep on riding me and they're gonna be picking iron out of your liver.
Humphrey Bogart: The cheaper the crook, the gaudier the patter.
3) Second favorite Hal Ashby film
I missed a bunch. I liked The Last Detail best and the other ones I saw have good things in them but there’s no obvious number two.
4) Describe the moment when you first realized movies were directed as opposed to simply pieced together anonymously.
There’s a WW II movie called No Man Is an Island (1962). I was 11 or 12, watching it on TV with my dad. Jeffrey Hunter & his guys are escaping Japanese soldiers by climbing up a cliff side, and there’s a zoom in on them (maybe even an iris), which puzzled me. “Does that mean the Japanese guys are looking at them with binoculars?” I asked. My father guessed it did. Turned out it didn’t. I remember thinking, ‘well, somebody screwed up there.’ Which got me to wondering: who?
5) Favorite film book
The Movies by Richard Griffith & Arthur Mayer, and The Bad Guys by William K. Everson were the first two film books I owned (the former actually a communal family / bathroom possession) and although I think the Griffith & Meyer book is wrong-headed about almost everything and wrong-hearted more often than I’m comfortable with, I was gaping in wonder at the two page spread of the Thousand Faces of Lon Chaney (actually fourteen) before I could read the captions. I can’t even begin to articulate my debt to this book. (The Bad Guys has lots of monster pictures in it).
6) Diana Sands or Vonetta McGee?
Vonetta: Blacula, Repo Man, Woo Fook (whatever the hell that is), and I rest my case.
7) Most egregious gap in your viewing of films made in the past 10 years
I’m not sure how egregious my gaps are until I un-gap them, but I am preparing to delve into (thanks to Trailers from Hell & Netflix) the least-daunting-appearing works of Sion Sono.
8) Favorite line of dialogue from a comedy
Frank McHugh: What’s that on your head?
William Powell: Scrambled eggs. What did you think it was?
Frank McHugh: I didn’t know.
9) Second favorite Lloyd Bacon film
Picture Snatcher (1933)
10) Richard Burton or Roger Livesey?
Burton in Night of the Iguana & Virginia Woolf just barely edge out Livesey in the Archers movies.
11) Is there a movie you staunchly refuse to consider seeing? If so, why?
Anti-Christ. And you KNOW why.
12) Favorite filmmaker collaboration
Hitchcock and Bernard Herrmann, unless this means a director / director mash-up, in which case, I dunno. Truffaut / Goddard for Breathless?

Jeff Gee said...

13) Most recently viewed movie on DVD/Blu-ray/theatrical?
On DVD: The Ninth Gate. In the theater: Argo.
14) Favorite line of dialogue from a horror movie
Dr. Pretorius: Do you know who Henry Frankenstein is, and who you are?
The Monster: Yes, I know. Made me from dead. I love dead... hate living.
Dr. Pretorius: You are wise in your generation. We must have a long talk, and then I have an important call to make.
15) Second favorite Oliver Stone film
The Doors
16) Eva Mendes or Raquel Welch?
Raquel. Anybody my age saying different is unfathomable to me
17) Favorite religious satire
The Robe. And can I change my answer to number 10?
18) Best Internet movie argument? (question contributed by Tom Block)
Is Ferris Bueller a projection of Cameron’s, ala Fight Club?
19) Most pointless Internet movie argument? (question contributed by Tom Block)
Is Ferris Bueller a projection of Cameron’s, ala Fight Club?
20) Charles McGraw or Robert Ryan?
Ryan.
21) Favorite line of dialogue from a western
From My Darling Clementine:
Henry Fonda: Which of yuh killed my brother James?
Walter Brennan: I did! And the other one, too!
22) Second favorite Roy Del Ruth film
You’re killing me. Well, I’ve seen only two, and the silver medal goes to The Alligator People. (# 1 is the 1931 Maltese Falcon).
23) Relatively unknown film or filmmaker you’d most eagerly proselytize for
Lisa Duva
24) Ewan McGregor or Gerard Butler?
Jesus. There’s a buddy movie to make your heart sink right to the fucking center of the earth.
25) Is there such a thing as a perfect movie?
My head says ‘of course not,’ but my other head says, ‘please point out the flaws in Rules of the Game, Tokyo Story, or Seven Samurai.’ Or The Maltese Falcon. Or etc.
26) Favorite movie location you’ve most recently had the occasion to actually visit *
In NYC last couple of weeks, and conscious of passing through shots from Dressed to Kill, Death Wish, Panic in Needle Park, Taking of Pelham 1 2 3, and of course King Kong!
27) Second favorite Delmer Daves film
Cowboy, with 3:10 to Yuma being number one, although the clips I’ve seen from The Red House suggest a possible new fave on the horizon.
28) Name the one DVD commentary you wish you could hear that, for whatever reason, doesn't actually exist *
Given James Ellroy’s commentary track on Andre de Toth’s Crime Wave, in which he speculates that Timothy Carey just might be the man who murdered his mother, I’m going with James Ellroy on The World’s Greatest Sinner.
29) Gloria Grahame or Marie Windsor?
Gloria!
30) Name a filmmaker who never really lived up to the potential suggested by their early acclaim or success
I think I will go with Patrick here and say Michael Reaves, career arc terminated on account of death. It can be difficult not to take it personally when someone from whom you expect endless great things sputters out into mediocrity but I imagine it’s pretty shitty for them, too.
31) Is there a movie-based disagreement serious enough that it might cause you to reevaluate the basis of a romantic relationship or a friendship?
Friendship, no. However, when Jennifer Lawrence said she wasn’t going to sit through some ‘boring blank-and-white silent movie,’ it occurred to me that we might not hit it off on a blind date as well as I’d hitherto assumed. But after her hilarious post-Oscar interview I thought, well, maybe I’m putting too much attention on the ‘black-and-white silent’ part and not enough on the ‘boring.’

Happy Miser said...

21) Favorite line of dialogue from a western: "When you pull a gun; kill a man." The true code of the West from My Darling Clementine.

Tom Block said...


1) The classic movie moment everyone loves except me is:

Since I can’t pick all of “The Big Lebowski”, I’ll go with MacMurray laying eyes on Stanwyck for the first time in “Double Indemnity”—yet another of Wilder’s self-consciously classic moments. The deep, deep appeal of that scene, like most of the rest of that movie, is a mystery to me.

2) Favorite line of dialogue from a film noir

Body and Soul: “What are you gonna do, kill me? Everybody dies.”

3) Second favorite Hal Ashby film

“Shampoo”

4) Describe the moment when you first realized movies were directed as opposed to simply pieced together anonymously.

“Bonnie and Clyde”. I was 13 the first time I saw it and sat through it twice, completely enthralled. I noticed everything that day: the association between the music cues and automobiles, the strangeness of Estelle Parsons’ jodhpurs, the time-lapse shot just before the shootout at the fairgrounds. I’ve never been so ready to learn from a particular movie as I was that day.

5) Favorite film book

Gotta be that complete Farber collection that came out a few years ago. Just as a stylist he was endlessly fascinating.

6) Diana Sands or Vonetta McGee?

Sands, for “The Landlord” alone.

7) Most egregious gap in your viewing of films made in the past 10 years

Fantasy: couldn’t finish the Hobbit trilogy, and I missed both Narnias, the last three Star Wars movies, and all of the Harry Potter and Pirates of the Caribbean movies. I’m now in the process of missing the Hunger Games and the SECOND Hobbit trilogy. None of these gaps feel “egregious”, though. If I hadn’t seen all the things I’ve been watching in lieu of all that stuff, THAT I’d consider to be egregious.

8) Favorite line of dialogue from a comedy

My mind is blank, mostly because it’s swarming with candidates.

9) Second favorite Lloyd Bacon film

Whew. “Marked Woman” is my favorite, this I know for sure. Much as I love “42nd Street” and “Footlight Parade”, I’ll go with “Wonder Bar”—a great showcase for Jolson and it has that hot S&M dance with Del Rio and Cortez.

10) Richard Burton or Roger Livesey?

Burton, for his mocking laughter on the lawn in “Virginia Woolf” and his many shades of gray in “Spy Who Came In from the Cold”.

11) Is there a movie you staunchly refuse to consider seeing? If so, why?

“Staunchly refuse” makes it sound like a large, conscious moral decision, but between my disinterest in the director, my unwillingness to support such a project, and the descriptions of it being such a turn-off, I won’t be seeing “The Passion of the Christ” any time soon. Frankly, I wasn’t crazy about “The Last Temptation of Christ” either, but the idea of Christians protesting it while turning out in record numbers for “Passion” sums up a lot of what’s sorry about America.

12) Favorite filmmaker collaboration

I’m taking “collaboration” in the broadest sense and picking “Paris, Texas”—it has what would be most people’s career bests from Wenders, Stanton, Cooder, Muller, and Shepard. More narrowly, Ford and Wayne.

13) Most recently viewed movie on DVD/Blu-ray/theatrical?

“Holy Motors”/Arnold’s “Wuthering Heights”/some noir thing

14) Favorite line of dialogue from a horror movie

Stumped. Absolutely stumped.

15) Second favorite Oliver Stone film

There’s no real answer since “Salvador” is the only one I’d willingly sit through again. I’m interested in “Savages”, though.

Tom Block said...

16) Eva Mendes or Raquel Welch?

Welch, but she never did much for me beyond the obvious. Fonda, Bardot, Christie, MacLaine—these were the ones that drove me wild in the ’60s. Unfortunately, most of them are crazy today.

17) Favorite religious satire

18) Best Internet movie argument?

A long intense argument about Malick right after “The Thin Red Line” came out, fought between about a dozen people on a private forum. It was lasted for days and wound up touching on a million ancillary subjects, and the participants were all smarter than hell. It got pretty nasty in places and nobody’s mind was ultimately changed, but it was a delightful way to chew up three or four days.

19) Most pointless Internet movie argument?

After hanging out on a movie forum for several years with the same group of people, I was amazed when the subject of subtitles came up one day and about half of them came firmly down on the side of dubbing. These were pretty knowledgeable people, too, but they all insisted that having to read and the frame space taken up by subtitles made dubbing a no-brainer. I thought it would be easy to sway them, and still remember beginning my first post on the subject with “Can you imagine watching a Jimmy Stewart movie and hearing someone else’s voice?” Nope! Two days later we were still at it. Three days later I’d murdered them all, and I’m now writing this from a supermax prison.

20) Charles McGraw or Robert Ryan?

I love McGraw but he’s a character actor. Ryan had the range and body language of a major star, and an uncommonly intense emotional core.

21) Favorite line of dialogue from a western

These favorite line ones are killing me.

22) Second favorite Roy Del Ruth film

“Lady Killer”

23) Relatively unknown film or filmmaker you’d most eagerly proselytize for

Eagle Pennell or Maurice Pialat

24) Ewan McGregor or Gerard Butler?

McGregor, easily.

25) Is there such a thing as a perfect movie?

I think so. I don’t know what I’d change in “Grand Illusion”, “Ride the High Country” and probably half a dozen others.

26) Favorite movie location you’ve most recently had the occasion to actually visit

In an hour we could walk from my house to the subway station where the gunfight happens in “48 HRS”, the cemetery where Madeleine visits Carlotta’s grave, and the dentist’s office in “Greed”. My favorite location is also probably “Vertigo”-related: the mission at San Juan Batista, which looks amazingly like it does in the movie. A buggy and papier-mâché horse are still sitting in the barn.

27) Second favorite Delmer Daves film

Probably “3:10 to Yuma” (“The Red House” is #1). I’ll watch “Jubal” when the Criterion comes along.

28) Name the one DVD commentary you wish you could hear that, for whatever reason, doesn't actually exist

Von Stroheim on “Greed”

29) Gloria Grahame or Marie Windsor?

Grahame. This is McGraw/Ryan redux. Also, much as I like Windsor, Grahame’s particular brands of sexuality, weirdness and wildness are right up my alley.

30) Name a filmmaker who never really lived up to the potential suggested by their early acclaim or success

I’m starting to worry about Paul Thomas Anderson. The guy’s a fucking master but I’m not sure what all that technique is in service of.

31) Is there a movie-based disagreement serious enough that it might cause you to reevaluate the basis of a romantic relationship or a friendship?

Sure. I used to have a girlfriend/eventual roommate who called almost everything I liked “pretentious shit”, and that was only the seventh or eighth most serious relationship problem we had. I’ve had other friends who, given the choice between a good American film and a good foreign film, would reflexively pick the American one every single time, and that drove me nuts.

Josh K. said...

1) The classic movie moment everyone loves except me is:
I’m a big George Cukor fan, but almost everything in MY FAIR LADY leaves me cold.

2) Favorite line of dialogue from a film noir
“All that Cain did to Abel was murder him.” – FORCE OF EVIL
3) Second favorite Hal Ashby film
THE LANDLORD
4) Describe the moment when you first realized movies were directed as opposed to simply pieced together anonymously. *
When several of Hitchcock’s films first came out on VHS in the 1980s when I was a kid, my parents (who weren’t even film buffs) rented several and told me who Hitchcock was. I watched the films, loved them, and noticed for the first time a director’s personality and sensibility stretching across multiple films. I was hooked on directors from then on.
5) Favorite film book
The Immediate Experience by Robert Warshow
6) Diana Sands or Vonetta McGee?
Vonetta McGee gets the slight edge. Love both of them.
7) Most egregious gap in your viewing of films made in the past 10 years
I haven’t seen a single film by James Gray or Pedro Costa, but reading about both makes me think I’m missing out on some great stuff.
8) Favorite line of dialogue from a comedy
A tie, both from THE PALM BEACH STORY
“I'm the Wienie King! Invented the Texas Wienie! Lay off 'em, you'll live longer.” and “That's one of the tragedies of this life - that the men who are most in need of a beating up are always enormous.”
9) Second favorite Lloyd Bacon film
Lloyd Bacon is another egregious gap for me.
10) Richard Burton or Roger Livesey?
Richard Burton
11) Is there a movie you staunchly refuse to consider seeing? If so, why?
There are plenty of films I don’t have any desire to see, but I can’t think of anything I’d staunchly refuse to see if presented the opportunity.
12) Favorite filmmaker collaboration
Rudy Wurlitzer and Robert Frank’s codirection of CANDY MOUNTAIN.
13) Most recently viewed movie on DVD/Blu-ray/theatrical?
DVD – Robert Benton’s BAD COMPANY
Theatrical – Werner Herzog and Dmitry Vasyukov’s HAPPY PEOPLE
14) Favorite line of dialogue from a horror movie
Mrs. Dudley’s part of the following exchange from THE HAUNTING:
Mrs. Dudley: [Eleanor has just been shown her room after she arrives] I can't keep the rooms the way I'd like, but there's no one else they could get that would help me.
Eleanor Lance: How very nice.
Mrs. Dudley: I set dinner on the dining room sideboard at 6. I clear up in the morning. I have breakfast for you at 9. I don't wait on people. I don't stay after I set out the dinner, not after it begins to get dark. I leave before the dark.
Eleanor Lance: Your husband?
Mrs. Dudley: We live over in town, miles away.
Eleanor Lance: Yes.
Mrs. Dudley: So there won't be anyone around if you need help.
Eleanor Lance: I understand.
Mrs. Dudley: We couldn't hear you. In the night.
Eleanor Lance: Do you have any idea when Dr. Markway...
Mrs. Dudley: [cuts her off] No one could. No one lives any nearer than town. No one will come any nearer than that.
Eleanor Lance: I know.
Mrs. Dudley: In the night. In the dark.

Josh K. said...

15) Second favorite Oliver Stone film
TALK RADIO is the only Stone film I can stand, so I guess all the others are tied for second.
16) Eva Mendes or Raquel Welch?
Eva Mendes
17) Favorite religious satire
SIMON OF THE DESERT
18) Best Internet movie argument? (question contributed by Tom Block)
Any of the debates in the comment section at Glenn Kenny’s blog
19) Most pointless Internet movie argument? (question contributed by Tom Block)
Is film culture dead?
20) Charles McGraw or Robert Ryan?
Robert Ryan
21) Favorite line of dialogue from a western
“A game-legged old man and a drunk. That’s all you got?” “It’s WHAT I got.” – RIO BRAVO
22) Second favorite Roy Del Ruth film
I’ve only seen BLONDE CRAZY, which I loved. I’m also a fan of the trailer for THE ALLIGATOR PEOPLE, but I’m guessing that’s not Del Ruth at his best.
23) Relatively unknown film or filmmaker you’d most eagerly proselytize for
I saw Matthew Gordon’s THE DYNAMITER at the Austin Film Festival last year, and I wish someone would give this first-time feature filmmaker wide distribution for this beautiful film.
24) Ewan McGregor or Gerard Butler?
Ewan McGregor
25) Is there such a thing as a perfect movie?
No, thank god.
26) Favorite movie location you’ve most recently had the occasion to actually visit *
Almost every day, I walk or drive past the restaurant/bar where the interior for most of the first half of DEATH PROOF was shot.
27) Second favorite Delmer Daves film
Delmer Daves is another egregious gap.
28) Name the one DVD commentary you wish you could hear that, for whatever reason, doesn't actually exist *
I’d like to assemble a panel of the most hilarious grandparents (intentionally AND unintentionally hilarious) of my high school friends and see what they’d make of any Harmony Korine film.
29) Gloria Grahame or Marie Windsor?
Gloria Grahame
30) Name a filmmaker who never really lived up to the potential suggested by their early acclaim or success
I’ve been disappointed by every post-BODY HEAT Lawrence Kasdan film.
31) Is there a movie-based disagreement serious enough that it might cause you to reevaluate the basis of a romantic relationship or a friendship? *
I was going to say no, but I remembered a former coworker who said her and her boyfriend only liked 3D movies. I wouldn’t have lasted an hour with that woman.

weepingsam said...

Part 1:

1) The classic movie moment everyone loves except me is:
A: This is one of those questions that I will be able to answer 3 months from now when someone will say how much they love that scene in X, and I will think, Christ, that is a stupid scene, and then I will remember this quiz and say, I wish I had remembered that back in March. but I don't remember it now, so I have to let this one go.

2) Favorite line of dialogue from a film noir
A: There are lots of famous lines - though the one that seems to me to get the essence of noir is the last line in the Killing - “what’s the difference?” Hayden's delivery is required, of course.

3) Second favorite Hal Ashby film
A: Shampoo (Harold and Maude is number 1)

4) Describe the moment when you first realized movies were directed as opposed to simply pieced together anonymously. *
A: There might be two answers here. One might not be what you are asking - I because an auteurist because of Howard Hawks. I noticed that he had directed a number of completely different films I loved - Bringing up Baby, Scarface, The Big Sleep, Red River - and thought - you know, these films have nothing obvious in common, but they all play alike - how does that work?.... The other is a bit strange: I believe it is true that I made a film before I had ever actually seen one. It’s not quite literally true, even in the narrow sense of seeing a film as film, projected - I saw home movies and 8 and 16 mm films in school and church and what not. But commercially, I did not go to the movies - but I made one, in early high school, along with my Sunday school class - a Christmas film. I played Joseph. 8 mm with post synch sound (which didn’t work too well because the tape player had a dying battery.) So - my point being - I knew more about how films were made (at a pretty basic, crude level) before I had seen enough films to have any other ideas about them.

5) Favorite film book
A: David Bordwell’s Ozu book

6) Diana Sands or Vonetta McGee
A: Vonetta McKee

7) Most egregious gap in your viewing of films made in the past 10 years
A: Given my loyalty to Hong Kong films in the 90s, I find it very troubling that I have seen so few in the 00s and 10s. 2-3 Johnny To films is about it - which itself is very disappointing to me..

8) Favorite line of dialogue from a comedy
A: This is a very tough one, but I might as well go to the top: “Gentlemen, Chicolini here may talk like an idiot, and look like an idiot, but don't let that fool you: he really is an idiot.”

9) Second favorite Lloyd Bacon film
A: Footlight Parade (after 42nd Street, of course)

10) Richard Burton or Roger Livesey
A: Burton

11) Is there a movie you staunchly refuse to consider seeing? If so, why?
A: There are no lack of them - it would take an act of god to get me to watch any of the 50 million superhero films that come out every month, just to name one current trend I want no part of.

12) Favorite filmmaker collaboration
A: I'm going with Tabu, Flaherty and Murnau.

13) Most recently viewed movie on DVD/Blu-ray/theatrical?
A: DVD is Creation, the Paul Bettany Darwin movie, of all things. Theatrically, it’s been a Chilean weekend, as I saw Night Across the Street yesterday and No today.

14) Favorite line of dialogue from a horror movie
A: As a line - “are we not men?” - takes the prize - the whole sequence maybe. “What is the law?” I’m afraid a lot of the things that come to mind for horror films are really comedy lines - Herbert West’s “You’re not even a second rate scientist!” or Dwight Frye’s delivery of “It’s a very fresh one!” Though I suppose Karloff’s “We belong dead!” would be another strong contender.

15) Second favorite Oliver Stone film
A: Probably Salvador. (After Platoon.) I don’t really like Oliver Stone.

weepingsam said...

Part 2:


16) Eva Mendes or Raquel Welch
A: Raquel Welch.

17) Favorite religious satire
A: Life of Brian is the runaway winner.

18) Best Internet movie argument? (question contributed by Tom Block)
A: The good ones tend to be over films or filmmakers - working out differences between the good and the great, usually. Someone upthread mentioned arguing about the Thin Red Line - I was in some of those; and Magnolia; and since then, you get the same thing, directly or indirectly, over various films and directors - Malick, Lynch, Anderson and Anderson, Tarantino seem to be frequent subjects for debate. Usually fairly informative and engaging. More general topics tend not to be quite so edifying.

19) Most pointless Internet movie argument? (question contributed by Tom Block)
A: every couple years I seem to run into another argument about auteurism. No thanks! (Not that I have ever been able to not have an opinion.)

20) Charles McGraw or Robert Ryan
A: Robert Ryan

21) Favorite line of dialogue from a western
A: “When you have to shoot, shoot. Don't talk.”

22) Second favorite Roy Del Ruth film
A: Employee’s Entrance (after Blessed Event) - hey, maybe “go ahead, shoot! What are you, yellow?” ought to be my favorite line. Warren Wiliam is a good one. (But yes, Lee Tracy is better.)

23) Relatively unknown Film or filmmaker you’d most eagerly proselytize for
A: Well, let’s just say Blessed Event and leave it at that.

24) Ewan McGregor or Gerard Butler
A: Ewan McGregor

25) Is there such a thing as a perfect movie?
A: Rushmore?

26) Favorite movie location you’ve most recently had the occasion to actually visit *
A: I saw Alex Karpovsky's Rubberneck last week - saw it at the Brattle - I can’t remember if there was a scene at the Brattle or only at the Coolidge - either way. It has not been long since I was in the same lobby, maybe the same seats, as the characters on screen. And of course, there is a scene in the film Kendall station. Though this whole thing might be a bit odd, since a couple scenes in Mystic River were shot in the building where I work, so - you know, every day.

27) Second favorite Delmer Daves film
A: Dark Passage

28) Name the one DVD commentary you wish you could hear that, for whatever reason, doesn't actually exist
A: the Marx Brothers’ commentary on Duck Soup?

29) Gloria Grahame or Marie Windsor
A: Grahame, isn’t it? She is something.

30) Name a filmmaker who never really lived up to the potential suggested by their early acclaim or success
A: David Gordon Green is an obvious example; there might be better, but he is the obvious one.

31) Is there a movie-based disagreement serious enough that it might cause you to reevaluate the basis of a romantic relationship or a friendship? *
A: I am not sure I can think of anything. I’m pretty forgiving.

Happy Miser said...

2) Favorite line of dialogue from a film noir
" I should be very sorry to see my neighbor's children devoured by wolves." Laura.

Larry A. said...

       1)      The classic movie moment everyone loves except me is:
Garbo on the prow of the ship in Queen Christina. Never understood what was so great about that shot. She's a lot more alluring in so many other movie moments.

2)      Favorite line of dialogue from a film noir
Today's favorite:
Sam Spade: "The cheaper the crook, the gaudier the patter, eh?"
       
       3)      Second favorite Hal Ashby film
A tie between Coming Home and The Last Detail.
       
       4)      Describe the moment when you first realized movies were directed as opposed to simply pieced together anonymously.
Can't remember. I'm sure it had to be Hitchcock, though.
       
       5)      Favorite film book
Play It As It Lays, Joan Didion.
       
       6)      Diana Sands or Vonetta McGee?
Vonetta.
       
       7)      Most egregious gap in your viewing of films made in the past 10 years
The Master
       
       8)      Favorite line of dialogue from a comedy
Today's favorite:
Tom: I mean, sex didn't even enter into it.
Gerry: Oh, but of course it did, darling. I don't think he'd have given it to me if I had hair like excelsior and little short legs like an alligator. Sex always has something to do with it, dear.
Tom: I see.
Gerry: From the time you're about so big and wondering why your girlfriends' fathers are getting so arch all of a sudden. Nothing wrong - just an overture to the opera that's coming.

       9)      Second favorite Lloyd Bacon film
Footlight Parade.
       
       10)   Richard Burton or Roger Livesey?
Livesey. Burton never made a Powell-Pressburger movie.
       
       11)   Is there a movie you staunchly refuse to consider seeing? If so, why?
So many. Lately, Les Miserables. I don't like the material and I don't like Tom Hooper's previous movie.
       
       12)   Favorite filmmaker collaboration
RoBurt productions (Robert Aldrich and Burt Reynolds)
       
       13)   Most recently viewed movie on DVD/Blu-ray/theatrical?
DVD: Heaven's Gate. Haven't seen a movie in a theater since...I can't remember.
       
       14)   Favorite line of dialogue from a horror movie
"Why do so many online friends write about horror movies all the time?" Oh, sorry, that's MY favorite line of dialogue about horror movies.
        
       15)   Second favorite Oliver Stone film
Savages.
       
     

Larry A. said...

              16)   Eva Mendes or Raquel Welch?
RAQUEL.
       
       17)   Favorite religious satire
The Tree Of Life?
       
       18)   Best Internet movie argument? (question contributed by Tom Block)
If I take the time to fill out these quizzes, why doesn't the guy who writes them?
       
       19)   Most pointless Internet movie argument? (question contributed by Tom Block) 
See No. 18.
       
       20)   Charles McGraw or Robert Ryan?
Ryan.
         
       21)   Favorite line of dialogue from a western
Tom: That's MY steak, Valance.
       
       22)   Second favorite Roy Del Ruth film
First, I need a first. Blessed Event?
       
       23)   Relatively unknown film or filmmaker you’d most eagerly proselytize for
John Dahl, among modern filmmakers. The Last Seduction is a masterpiece, and his other movies show off a facility to slip between genres like the old studio hands could.
       
       24)   Ewan McGregor or Gerard Butler?
That's a choice?
       
       25)   Is there such a thing as a perfect movie?
Yes, Casablanca. His Girl Friday. Chinatown. Lots of 'em.
       
       26)   Favorite movie location you’ve most recently had the occasion to actually visit
Last summer. Ridgeway, Colo. Saw some of the sets and props for the original True Grit filmed there.
       
       27)   Second favorite Delmer Daves film
Jubal.
        
       28)   Name the one DVD commentary you wish you could hear that, for whatever reason, doesn't actually exist
Hawks, Grant, Hecht and Russell on His Girl Friday.
       
       29)   Gloria Grahame or Marie Windsor?
G. L. O. R. I. A. Gloooooooria!
       
       30)   Name a filmmaker who never really lived up to the potential suggested by their early acclaim or success
P.T. Anderson
       
       31)   Is there a movie-based disagreement serious enough that it might cause you to reevaluate the  basis of a romantic relationship or a friendship?
No, that would mean you are an extremely shallow or self-absorbed person, probably both.

Dennis Cozzalio said...

That hurts, man... that hurts. I've done the last couple! And I'm gonna do this one too! You wait and see! You just wait and s-s-seeee... [ Sobbing ]

Mr. Peel said...

1. The classic movie moment everyone loves except me: Probably any scene that people love in DEAD POETS’ SOCIETY.
2. Favorite line of dialogue from a film noir: “Remember Me”. Or any line from DETOUR.
3. Second favorite Hal Ashby film: BEING THERE. SHAMPOO is number one. HAROLD AND MAUDE is a very close third.
4. Describe the moment when you realized movies were directed as opposed to put together anonymously: I was an eight year-old who insisted on staying through the end credits so maybe I always knew.
5. Favorite film book: I’m not saying it’s definitely my favorite but I’ve been going through a period where I’m reading Zeroville over and over and over. I believe it’s a very good book.
6. Diana Sands or Vonetta McGee: I’m not sure that either one is necessarily a favorite but since Diana Sands was in Ashby’s THE LANDLORD that puts her up to the front of the line.
7. Most egregious gap in your viewing of films made in the past ten years: Too many to name. I guess I could have seen more Asian Cinema. What I’ve seen of mumblecore doesn’t make me want to seek out others. Plus I missed all the TWILIGHTS but I don’t feel so bad about that.
8. Favorite line of dialogue from a comedy: “Don’t call me Shirley” is almost too obvious but it rarely gets better than that.
9. Second favorite Lloyd Bacon film:Why are you doing this to me? I’m not sure I’ve seen any other than 42ND STREET, so what can I tell you.
10. Richard Burton or Roger Livesey: Burton. VIRGINIA WOOLF and all.
11. Is there a movie you staunchly refuse to consider seeing? If so, why?: I’ve always kind of avoided seeing SALO but I don’t know if that falls under ‘staunchly refuses’. Mostly I just don’t think about what I don’t want to see. I’m not even sure that my not seeing any of the SAW series has to do with anything other than mild apathy. How about any movie that stars Gerard Butler?
12. Favorite filmmaker collaboration: Not sure if this has to stick to what’s in the credits or not so I’ll go with Donen & Kelly on SINGIN’ IN THE RAIN.
13. Most recently viewed movie on DVD/Blu-ray/theatrical?John Milius’ THE WIND AND THE LION on DVD. It was all right. Milius in interviews is often much more interesting than his films/THE MASTER on Blu-ray. I’m pretty much watching sections of it every day now/SKIN GAME at the New Beverly. As for new movies, OZ THE GREAT AND POWERFUL at the Vista. I’m not seeing many new films these days. Lousy digital projection.
14. Favorite line of dialogue from a horror movie: “Magic is everywhere and all over the world. It's a recognized fact. Always.”

Mr. Peel said...

15. Second favorite Oliver Stone film: JFK. WALL STREET is number one.
16. Eva Mendes or Raquel Welch: You know what? Eva Mendes is a really good actor. Give it to her.
17. Favorite religious satire: BEDAZZLED ’67 (featuring Raquel Welch so don’t go expecting consistency from me).
18. Best Internet movie argument?: Is there such a thing as a good internet movie argument?
19. Most pointless Internet movie argument?: See above
20. Charles McGraw or Robert Ryan: Robert Ryan but, damn, THE NARROW MARGIN is good.
21. Favorite line of dialogue from a western: A tie between “You better bury Ned right! Better not cut up, nor otherwise harm no whores. Or I'll come back and kill every one of you sons of bitches.” and “Someday.”
22. Second favorite Roy Del Ruth film: *sigh*
23. Relatively unknown Film or filmmaker you’d most eagerly proselytize for: I’d love to be able to show a packed house Milos Forman’s TAKING OFF.
24. Ewan McGregor or Gerard Butler: Ewan McGregor. I wouldn’t hire Gerard Butler to play the lead in THE GERARD BUTLER STORY.
25. Is there such a thing as a perfect movie?: Well, TAKING OFF comes to mind. So does THE UMBRELLAS OF CHERBOURG. And CASABLANCA. And THE GREAT ESCAPE. And AIRPLANE! And DOUBLE INDEMNITY. I’m sure there are a few others I could think of, but you get the idea.
26. Favorite movie location you’ve most recently had the occasion to actually visit: I often find myself walking past the northwest corner of Vermont and Franklin, as referenced in DOUBLE INDEMNITY, but they didn’t actually shoot that scene there.
27. Second favorite Delmer Daves film: I like DARK PASSAGE but you said second best. Guess I’ll get back to you.
28. Name the one DVD commentary you wish you could hear that, for whatever reason, doesn't actually exist: Too many to name. Ray, Bogart and Grahame on IN A LONELY PLACE comes to mind.
29. Gloria Grahame or Marie Windsor: Sure, I just mentioned Grahame and I should probably name her anyway, but this is Marie Windsor we’re talking about. I can’t say no to Marie Windsor.
30. Name a filmmaker who never really lived up to the potential suggested by their early acclaim or success: George Lucas. Makes me weep.
31. Is there a movie-based disagreement serious enough that it might cause you to reevaluate the basis of a romantic relationship or a friendship?: If someone wants to say to me that they hate Lubitsch/Wilder/Hawks/You get the idea and they’re coming at it from a serious, thoughtful place I’d like to think that I’d be open to what they have to say. Maybe they would make me think about whatever the film is in a way I’d never considered before. I’ve certainly heard intelligent people say bad things about movies I love and they had a good reason. But if it’s someone who thinks that these movies are boring or dumb or old-fashioned or only good for watching on Mystery Science Theater 3000 then, well, what would even be the point of continuing a single conversation? Also, if someone told me they preferred digital projection to 35mm, that might be a rough start.

Roderick Heath said...

My answers have been posted on This Island Rod, Dennis:

http://thisislandrod.blogspot.com.au/2013/03/miss-jean-brodies-modestly-magnificent.html

Happy Miser said...

8)Favorite line from a comedy:
"I always keep a pair of mules under my bed."
"And don't the board of health say nutin? Joan Davis/Lou Costello: Hold That Ghost.

wwolfe said...

1) The classic movie moment everyone loves except me is: DeNiro talking to himself in the mirror in Taxi Driver. I’m sure this is because I saw SCTV’s parodies of it before I saw the original. As a result, in my mind’s eye it will always be Gregory Peck via Joe Flaherty who delivers this monologue, rather than Travis Bickle.

2) Favorite line of dialogue from a film noir: “She came at me in sections.” – Farewell, My Lovely Appetizer, by S.J. Perelman

3) Second favorite Hal Ashby film: The Last Detail (Shampoo is #1.)

4) Describe the moment when you first realized movies were directed as opposed to simply pieced together anonymously.

The scene where Cary Grant carries the glass of milk upstairs in “Suspicion,” seen by me on Channel 61 out of Cleveland (hurray, UHF!) when I was eight or nine. I distinctly remember thinking, “Someone made this – it didn’t just happen.”

5) Favorite film book: The American Cinema, by Andrew Sarris

6) Diana Sands or Vonetta McGee? Vonetta

7) Most egregious gap in your viewing of films made in the past 10 years. I’ve seen nothing from Hong Kong.

8) Favorite line of dialogue from a comedy. Wow – who can choose one line??

9) Second favorite Lloyd Bacon film: You Were Meant For Me, from 1948, with Jean Crain as a girl who marries bandleader Dan Dailey. The feel for place (pre-War smalltown America and the hotels and ballrooms where the band spends its time) and time (Roaring Twenties heading into the Great Depression) are both evocative. Most memorable is Crain’s surprisingly open expression of sexual yearning in her early scenes.

10) Richard Burton or Roger Livesey? Livesy.

11) Is there a movie you staunchly refuse to consider seeing? If so, why? I don’t think I’ll ever watch the opening scene to Saving Private Ryan. I don’t want those images in my head, and I think I might get sick to my stomach.

12) Favorite filmmaker collaboration: Raoul Walsh and Errol Flynn.

13) Most recently viewed movie on DVD/Blu-ray/theatrical? Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows.

14) Favorite line of dialogue from a horror movie.

Actually, this is from the movie’s poster: “Herbert West had a very good head on his shoulders…and another one in a dish on his desk.” (Re-Animator)

15) Second favorite Oliver Stone film: Wall Street (Salvador is favorite.)

16) Eva Mendes or Raquel Welch? Raquel never seemed at ease in front of the movie camera. Eva was fun in The Other Guys – or, more accurately, Mark Wahlberg’s disbelief at the sight of Will Ferrell married to Eva Mendes was fun – so I could lean her direction. However, The Three Musketeers was a really good movie, where Richard Lester managed to find a way to use Raquel’s awkwardness as a comic asset. So I’ll go with Raquel. (Plus, the poster from One Million Years, B.C. was iconic, even if the movie was not.)

wwolfe said...

17) Favorite religious satire: Life of Brian.

20) Charles McGraw or Robert Ryan? McGraw is very cool in Narrow Margin, and Ryan’s screen presence always left me a little queasy (which was the point, I know, but still…). On Dangerous Ground is a really impressive piece of work by Ryan, though, and I admire the fact that he dug as deep as he did in The Iceman Cometh. So I guess that tips it toward Ryan.

21) Favorite line of dialogue from a western: “Let’s go home, Debbie.”

22) Second favorite Roy Del Ruth film: Well, either Blessed Event or Blonde Crazy is my favorite, so either Blonde Crazy or Blessed Event is second favorite. The Mind Reader, Employees’ Entrance, and Taxi! are all contenders for third. I also have a fondness for Beauty and the Boss, but it lacks del Ruth’s customary zip, despite Warren William in the lead).

23) Relatively unknown film or filmmaker you’d most eagerly proselytize for: Leo McCarey. He's well-known among readers of this blog, but I don't think most casual moviegoers would a clue who he was - even though many, if not most, would know one or more of his movies very well.

24) Ewan McGregor or Gerard Butler? Ewan, if for nothing else than Down With Love. Butler is a canned ham with a bad beard.

25) Is there such a thing as a perfect movie? As Geoffrey Tenant said in the great Slings and Arrows: “Nothing is more boring than perfection.” So, to answer the question: Perhaps – but it wouldn’t be a fun thing to witness.

26) Favorite movie location you’ve most recently had the occasion to actually visit: The rotunda in Los Angeles City Hall. You’d recognize it from dozens of movies and TV shows, if you saw it.

27) Second favorite Delmer Daves film: A Summer Place. (3:10 to Yuma is his best, although The Last Wagon is a sentimental favorite because my cousin Stephanie Griffin has a supporting role in it.)

28) Name the one DVD commentary you wish you could hear that, for whatever reason, doesn't actually exist. Joan Crawford and Bette Davis for Whatever Happened to Baby Jane.

29) Gloria Grahame or Marie Windsor? Gloria Grahame. No contest, for me, at least.

30) Name a filmmaker who never really lived up to the potential suggested by their early acclaim or success. Stanley Kubrick

31) Is there a movie-based disagreement serious enough that it might cause you to reevaluate the basis of a romantic relationship or a friendship? I think if someone said, “I just don’t like black-and-white movies” – meaning, really, any older movies – that would put a serious crimp in the relationship.

Dennis Cozzalio said...

WWolfe: I think it would be a very good idea if someone were to have Eva Mendes recreate that iconic Raquel Welch poster for One Million Years B.C....

Thanks for your answers!

Katherine Wilson said...

**********************************

1) The classic movie moment everyone loves except me is:

‘You had me at Hello.’

2) Favorite line of dialogue from a film noir

“Just pucker up and Blow’.

3) Second favorite Hal Ashby film
Shampoo

4) Describe the moment when you first realized movies were directed as opposed to simply pieced together anonymously. *

When Mark Rydell talked about being an ‘Auteur’ and not being a Walt Disney.

5) Favorite film book
Ephraim Katz’s ‘Film Encyclopedia’

6) Diana Sands or Vonetta McGee? Ruby Dee

7) Most egregious gap in your viewing of films made in the past 10 years
Anytime I am writing a Screenplay

8) Favorite line of dialogue from a comedy
Diamonds are a girls best friend.

9) Second favorite Lloyd Bacon film
42nd Street

10) Richard Burton or Roger Livesey? Richard Burton because Diamonds are a girl’s best friend.


11) Is there a movie you staunchly refuse to consider seeing? If so, why? Silence of the Lambs. Because it won the Oscar Sweeps and upset Cuckoos Nest’s record.

12) Favorite filmmaker collaboration Samuel Peckinpah and Warren Oates.

13) Most recently viewed movie on DVD/Blu-ray/theatrical? Argo

14) Favorite line of dialogue from a horror movie: Do you min’ if I dance wif your date?


15) Second favorite Oliver Stone film JFK

16) Eva Mendes or Raquel Welch?
Eva Mendes

17) Favorite religious satire The Exorcist


18) Best Internet movie argument? (question contributed by Tom Block)

PROFITS for filmmakers

19) Most pointless Internet movie argument? (question contributed by Tom Block)

Size of Screen

20) Charles McGraw or Robert Ryan?

Robert Ryan

21) Favorite line of dialogue from a western
John Wayne Drawl “I like the way you look in that dress little lady.” “Pilgrim”

22) Second favorite Roy Del Ruth film

23) Relatively unknown film or filmmaker you’d most eagerly proselytize for

Claire Peploe

24) Ewan McGregor or Gerard Butler?

Gerard Butler

25) Is there such a thing as a perfect movie?

“Perfect movies are rarely good movies.”

26) Favorite movie location you’ve most recently had the occasion to actually visit *

Dexter Lake Club of Animal House.

27) Second favorite Delmer Daves film

Rome Adventure

28) Name the one DVD commentary you wish you could hear that, for whatever reason, doesn't actually exist *

NONE

29) Gloria Grahame or Marie Windsor?
Neither


30) Name a filmmaker who never really lived up to the potential suggested by their early acclaim or success

John Landis

31) Is there a movie-based disagreement serious enough that it might cause you to reevaluate the basis of a romantic relationship or a friendship? *

Yes. “Shall we mortgage our house again, dear, for development hell?

* a classic or, if you must, recycled question from quizzes past that Miss Brodie thought might be interesting to revisit

**************************************

Dennis Cozzalio said...

Bill Ryan is far too shy to share his responses here, so I'll just have to do it for him. Behold, all the correct answers!

Steve Rust said...

1)The classic movie moment everyone loves except me is:
--"Play it again Sam"


2)Favorite line of dialogue from a film noir:
--"He's some kind of a man." from Touch of Evil

3) Second favorite Hal Ashby film:
--Coming Home.

4)Describe the moment when you first realized movies were directed as opposed to simply pieced together anonymously. *
--Sadly not until I saw Apocalypse Now when I was 18 or 19.

5)Favorite film book:
--At present: 'Pictures at a Revolution' by Mark Harris

6)Diana Sands or Vonetta McGee?
--Sands

7)Most egregious gap in your viewing of films made in the past 10 years.
-- Sad to admit I still haven't seen a Daniel Wu film from Hong Kong even though he's a famous UO alum

8)Favorite line of dialogue from a comedy
--"Goodbye my love!" Dumb & Dumber

9) Second favorite Lloyd Bacon film
-- Have only see two and I like Footlight Parade better than Knute Rockne

10)Richard Burton or Roger Livesey?
-- Probably Burton because I've seen more of his films

11)Is there a movie you staunchly refuse to consider seeing? If so, why?
--I have no desire to see Natural Born Killers again. In college we took an exchange student who claimed he had never seen a theatrical film before and he threw up halfway through and had to leave. The guilt is still with me.

12)Favorite filmmaker collaboration:
--Recently saw Jaglom's "A Safe Place" and loved his work with Orson Welles

13) Most recently viewed movie on DVD/Blu-ray/theatrical?
--DVD - A Celtic Pilgrimage with John O'Donahue

14) Favorite line of dialogue from a horror movie
--"We all go a little mad sometimes" Psycho

15)Second favorite Oliver Stone film
--The Doors

16)Eva Mendes or Raquel Welch?
--Eva

17)Favorite religious satire
--Life of Brian

18) Best Internet movie argument? (question contributed by Tom Block)
--Anything by Dennis (cough "suckup" cough)

19) Most pointless Internet movie argument? (question contributed by Tom Block)
- The comments section on Deadline Hollywood has plenty

20) Charles McGraw or Robert Ryan?
-- Ryan

21)Favorite line of dialogue from a western
-- The whimper made by the dog in Outlaw Josey Wales after Josey spits tobacco in the dogs eye - that poor dog

22) Second favorite Roy Del Ruth film
--Alligator People

23) Relatively unknown film or filmmaker you’d most eagerly proselytize for
-- Oh that guy who directed that thing, remember him?

24) Ewan McGregor or Gerard Butler?
-- Ewan

25) Is there such a thing as a perfect movie?
If you asked the 10-year-old me I would've said Empire Strikes Back, now I'm not so sure

26) Favorite movie location you’ve most recently had the occasion to actually visit *
--Fern Canyon in the Redwoods where scenes from Return of the Jedi, Jurassic Park and others were filmed

27)Second favorite Delmer Daves film:
only seen 3:10 unless his work as a writer for Queen Kelly counts

28) Name the one DVD commentary you wish you could hear that, for whatever reason, doesn't actually exist *
-- Woody Allen on Bananas

29)Gloria Grahame or Marie Windsor?
-- Gloria

30) Name a filmmaker who never really lived up to the potential suggested by their early acclaim or success
-- George Lucas

31)Is there a movie-based disagreement serious enough that it might cause you to reevaluate the basis of a romantic relationship or a friendship? *
-- If you don't love Miyazake do you really have a heart?

Robert Fiore said...

1) The classic movie moment everyone loves except me is:

I'm not that big of a contrarian on this question. I suppose I could say I like The Graduate a lot less than other people do.

2) Favorite line of dialogue from a film noir

[In response to the line "I don't want to die"] "Neither do I, baby, but if I do, I want to die last." Out of the Past

3) Second favorite Hal Ashby film

The Last Detail, after Harold and Maude.

4) Describe the moment when you first realized movies were directed as opposed to simply pieced together anonymously. *

I probably first saw Citizen Kane because I'd heard so much about Orson Welles as a director, though I can't remember the first time I saw it. What really got me thinking about directors as artists was reading Andrew Sarris' The American Cinema.

5) Favorite film book

Walter Kerr, The Silent Clowns.

6) Diana Sands or Vonetta McGee?

These are the questions that separate the blacksploitation aficionado from the parvenu. I wish the aficianadi the best of luck.

7) Most egregious gap in your viewing of films made in the past 10 years

Gaps in viewing films made in the last ten years are hardly ever egregious. Biggest recent film phenomenon I've skipped is, I've yet to see a Harry Potter movie. If we broaden the question to 20 years I suppose the most acclaimed thing I haven't gotten around to seeing is the Three Colors trilogy.

8) Favorite line of dialogue from a comedy

"What's the matter with bigamy?" (I'm finding that my favorite lines require some knowledge of the setup.)

9) Second favorite Lloyd Bacon film

Brother Orchid, after Boy Meets Girl. Wasn't really much more of an artist than the key grip was, though, was he? More of a technician.

10) Richard Burton or Roger Livesey?

Roger Livesey was in some of my favorite movies, while I don't think Burton was ever in a movie I actually liked. Burton was the more interesting personality, and a better actor.

Robert Fiore said...

11) Is there a movie you staunchly refuse to consider seeing? If so, why?

I'm not a horror movie guy generally, and I would say I pointedly avoid horror movies where characters get mutilated. But, here's my perversity: I will watch an action picture like 13 Assassins, which might have been better titled Total Massacre, and be happy as a clam, but the far less violent Audition I found distasteful.

12) Favorite filmmaker collaboration

Ernst Lubitsch and Samson Raphelson.

13) Most recently viewed movie on DVD/Blu-ray/theatrical?

On DVD The Detective (Alec Guinness as Father Brown), on Blu-ray Jour de Fete, in the theater Silver Linings Playbook, and just before that Tristana.

14) Favorite line of dialogue from a horror movie

My favorite line is actually misremembered, and I like it best the way I misremember it, which is "Any man would be proud to be buried in that coffin!", spoken by Peter Lorre in Comedy of Terrors.

15) Second favorite Oliver Stone film

Any Given Sunday. Looking down the list I realize I've hardly actually sat all the way through any of his films.

16) Eva Mendes or Raquel Welch?

Oh, come on now. Raquel Welch. The thing is, Raquel Welch was frustrating because you knew she was never actually going to get naked, and it's not like you'd watch her for her acting.

17) Favorite religious satire

Bedazzled. There is a belief that there is more than one version of this movie, but that's rank heresy.

18) Best Internet movie argument? (question contributed by Tom Block)

When did being on the Internet ever improve an argument?

19) Most pointless Internet movie argument? (question contributed by Tom Block)

I don't keep track, but it's probably a tie.

20) Charles McGraw or Robert Ryan?

Robert Ryan, naturally.

Robert Fiore said...

21) Favorite line of dialogue from a western

"That'll be the day."

22) Second favorite Roy Del Ruth film

The Harry Langdon shorts would be far and away the best movies he was ever involved with, and The Cat's Meow was the best of those. My favorite talkie would be Kid Millions.

23) Relatively unknown film or filmmaker you’d most eagerly proselytize for

Max Linder.

24) Ewan McGregor or Gerard Butler?

Ewan McGregor I suppose, but I don't have any real feeling for either of them.

25) Is there such a thing as a perfect movie?

There are movies that couldn't have been any better than they were.

26) Favorite movie location you’ve most recently had the occasion to actually visit *

The multiplane camera at the Walt Disney Studios.

27) Second favorite Delmer Daves film

So this is Hollywood hack month? Dark Passage after Dames, but no one on earth ever called Dames a Delmer Daves film, did they?

28) Name the one DVD commentary you wish you could hear that, for whatever reason, doesn't actually exist *

Preston Sturges on anything.

29) Gloria Grahame or Marie Windsor?

Gloria Grahame was in better movies. Marie Windsor is just far enough off being a true glamour girl that you can imagine you'd actually have a chance at her. The kind of girl Elisha Cook, Jr. thinks he can have.

30) Name a filmmaker who never really lived up to the potential suggested by their early acclaim or success.

Woody Allen.

31) Is there a movie-based disagreement serious enough that it might cause you to reevaluate the basis of a romantic relationship or a friendship?

What that question boils down to is would you give up a blow job for a movie, and the answer to that is you've got to be kidding.

Tony Dayoub said...

Hey Dennis,

My answers are posted here (along with some of the lovely photos you usually enjoy).

Jeff Gee said...

Holy crap! Dennis is right-- Bill Ryan for the Win!

Dennis Cozzalio said...

And then there's the Self-Styled Siren and her answers. Gee, the company in Miss Brodie's classroom has been, to the last student, top grade this time around! Even Bill! ;)

D Cairns said...

1) The classic movie moment everyone loves except me is:
Always had a slight problem with that nun at the end of Vertigo. But otherwise I *do* love it.

2) Favorite line of dialogue from a film noir
"Don't say that word: catgut! That's a HORRIBLE word!" Laird Cregar in This Gun for Hire.

3) Second favorite Hal Ashby film
The Landlord.

4) Describe the moment when you first realized movies were directed as opposed to simply pieced together anonymously.
I don't have a clear fix on it. But I knew SOMEBODY was rewriting paleontology in King Kong.

5) Favorite film book
Hitchcock/Truffaut maybe.

6) Diana Sands or Vonetta McGee?
Only know VG, who is VG indeed.

7) Most egregious gap in your viewing of films made in the past 10 years
Lots of Tarkovsky and Antonioni.

8) Favorite line of dialogue from a comedy
"A passport to hell is not issued on generalities." Laird Cregar in Heaven Can Wait.

9) Second favorite Lloyd Bacon film
Footlight Parade

10) Richard Burton or Roger Livesey?
Sentiment wins it for Roger

11) Is there a movie you staunchly refuse to consider seeing? If so, why?
Thousands! Because life is too short.

12) Favorite filmmaker collaboration
Powell-Pressburger

13) Most recently viewed movie on DVD/Blu-ray/theatrical?
Bell Book and Candle

14) Favorite line of dialogue from a horror movie
"Was the smudge trying to warn Clive of danger?" a true WTF moment from The Asphyx.

15) Second favorite Oliver Stone film
After Salvador it's all just a quagmire.

D Cairns said...

16) Eva Mendes or Raquel Welch?
For what? Sentiment says Raquel.

17) Favorite religious satire
I should say Viridiana or something but Life of Brian got the job done.

18) Best Internet movie argument? (question contributed by Tom Block)
I enjoyed that madness of Jeff Wells and the Rosemary's Baby aspect ratio, eventually settled by someone claiming to be Roman Polanski himself.

19) Most pointless Internet movie argument? (question contributed by Tom Block)
See above.

20) Charles McGraw or Robert Ryan?
Granite or steel cable? Both are essential to any monolithic undertaking.

21) Favorite line of dialogue from a western
"Where there's revolution, there's confusion, and where there's confusion, a man who knows what he wants stands a good chance o' gettin' it." Fistful of Dynamite

22) Second favorite Roy Del Ruth film
Blessed Event

23) Relatively unknown film or filmmaker you’d most eagerly proselytize for
Maybe Yuri Norstein, I could convert anyone in under an hour, and you could watch his entire oeuvre in a day. With meal breaks.

24) Ewan McGregor or Gerard Butler?
To a Scotsman, that's like saying "Crieff or Paisley?" -- impossible to get excited about either.

25) Is there such a thing as a perfect movie?
Not objectively.

26) Favorite movie location you’ve most recently had the occasion to actually visit
Greyfriar's churchyard?

27) Second favorite Delmer Daves film
3:10 to Yuma, I guess

28) Name the one DVD commentary you wish you could hear that, for whatever reason, doesn't actually exist
Harpo Marx on Duck Soup (just honking)

29) Gloria Grahame or Marie Windsor?
Tough call. But I always get a special thrill from spotting MW in a bit part.

30) Name a filmmaker who never really lived up to the potential suggested by their early acclaim or success
Me. Apart from the "acclaim or success" part.

31) Is there a movie-based disagreement serious enough that it might cause you to reevaluate the basis of a romantic relationship or a friendship?
Yes, but not in terms of criticism appreciation: in terms of collaboration on a movie, sure.

rudyfan1926 said...

My 2 cents here: http://strictly-vintage-hollywood.blogspot.com/2013/03/its-quiz-time.html

Robert T Daniel said...

1) The classic movie moment everyone loves except me is.The ending of King Kong. I find it unbearably sad.
2) Favorite line of dialogue from a film noir Terry Lennox: Well that's you, Marlowe. You'll never learn, you're a born loser. Philip Marlowe: Yeah, I even lost my cat. The Long Goodbye
3) Second favorite Hal Ashby film Being There
4) Describe the moment when you first realized movies were directed as opposed to simply pieced together anonymously. Seeing North by Northwest as a young man, in particular the scene where Cary Grant’s reflection is seen in the TV. I suddenly realized there is truly a difference between a regular thriller and a HITCHCOCK.
5) Favorite film book The Book of Lists: Horror. It’s a bit of a cheat because movies are included in roughly a third of the lists. However, I have read through it countless times and I treasure my autographed copy.
6) Diana Sands or Vonetta McGee? McGee
7) Most egregious gap in your viewing of films made in the past 10 years I recall not going to the movies much and not being particularly excited about what Hollywood was putting out between 2001 (besides Mulholland Drive) and 2005 or so and instead renting a lot of classics and foreign films.
8) Favorite line of dialogue from a comedy Cousin Eddie: They had to replace my metal plate with a plastic one. Every time Catherine would rev up the microwave, I'd piss my pants and forget who I was for about half an hour. National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation
9) Second favorite Lloyd Bacon film pass
10) Richard Burton or Roger Livesey? Burton

Robert T Daniel said...

11) Is there a movie you staunchly refuse to consider seeing? If so, why?
Ken Loach’s Kes. I know the movie is highly praised. I was curious when I first heard about it and, [spoiler alert] unfortunately, could not avoid reading about the horrible ending. I just don’t think I could bear watching the film now knowing that something that tragic and maddeningly cruel was awaiting a child.
12) Favorite filmmaker collaboration Lucas and Spielberg on Raiders of the Lost Ark.
13) Most recently viewed movie on DVD/Blu-ray/theatrical?I introduced my fiancé to No Country for Old Men last weekend. Like most people, she was puzzled by the ending at first, but she appreciated it overall.
14) Favorite line of dialogue from a horror movie Dr. Sam Loomis: I met him, fifteen years ago. I was told there was nothing left. No reason, no conscience, no understanding; even the most rudimentary sense of life or death, good or evil, right or wrong. I met this six-year-old child, with this blank, pale, emotionless face and, the blackest eyes... the *devil's* eyes. I spent eight years trying to reach him, and then another seven trying to keep him locked up because I realized what was living behind that boy's eyes was purely and simply... *evil*. Halloween
15) Second favorite Oliver Stone film Wall Street
16) Eva Mendes or Raquel Welch? Raquel!!!!
17) Favorite religious satire The Ruling Class. Brilliant and hilarious
18) Best Internet movie argument? (question contributed by Tom Block)
Easier access to hard to find classics.
19) Most pointless Internet movie argument? (question contributed by Tom Block)
The theatre experience is preferred, but is not always great.
20) Charles McGraw or Robert Ryan? Ryan

Robert T Daniel said...

21) Favorite line of dialogue from a western Tuco: When you have to shoot, shoot. Don't talk. The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
22) Second favorite Roy Del Ruth film Pass
23) Relatively unknown film or filmmaker you’d most eagerly proselytize for Scott Derrickson (The Exorcism of Emily Rose, The Day the Earth Stood Still, Sinister) is off to a very strong start and is one of the few horror directors right now that has, thankfully, not resorted to “shaky cam” or torture porn.
24) Ewan McGregor or Gerard Butler? McGregor
25) Is there such a thing as a perfect movie? Perfection is for math and science, not art. The flaws are often what makes a work of art special.
26) Favorite movie location you’ve most recently had the occasion to actually visit While in DC last year on business, I made a side trip to the infamous townhome and steps used in The Exorcist. I walked the steps from bottom to top, which gave me quite a workout!
27) Second favorite Delmer Daves film pass
28) Name the one DVD commentary you wish you could hear that, for whatever reason, doesn't actually exist Kubrick on The Shining (or any Kubrick film for that matter).
29) Gloria Grahame or Marie Windsor? Grahame for It’s a Wonderful Life
30) Name a filmmaker who never really lived up to the potential suggested by their early acclaim or successI know he’s a favorite “whipping boy” for questions like this, but Michael Cimino. The Deer Hunter is a brilliant, explosively acted film-and his infamous follow up, Heaven’s Gate, truly is a pretentious mess that derailed his career (and it’s still a mess, no matter what revisionist history has occurred recently).
31) Is there a movie-based disagreement serious enough that it might cause you to reevaluate the basis of a romantic relationship or a friendship? I would be disappointed and defensive if a close friend or loved one told me Kubrick or Lynch sucked.

Thom McGregor said...

1) The classic movie moment everyone loves except me is: All of "Casablanca."
2) Favorite line of dialogue from a film noir: All of "The Long Goodbye."
3) Second favorite Hal Ashby film: "Being There." I like "Shampoo" the best.
4) Describe the moment when you first realized movies were directed as opposed to simply pieced together anonymously: I think it was seeing "The World's Greatest Athlete" starring Jan-Michael Vincent.
5) Favorite film book: Can't think of anything. Maybe a picture book of Ewan McGregor?
6) Diana Sands or Vonetta McGee? I'm not familiar with either actress enough to make a choice. Actually never heard of Diana Sands until this year.
7) Most egregious gap in your viewing of films made in the past 10 years: Anything with gore or violence, but I've wanted to see just about every Quentin Tarantino movie, but just can't do it.
8) Favorite line of dialogue from a comedy: Something either Woody Allen or Groucho Marx said, probably.
9) Second favorite Lloyd Bacon film: He has so many to choose from! But actually, I haven't seen any.
10) Richard Burton or Roger Livesey? Don't like RB, but don't know RL. So, RL.
11) Is there a movie you staunchly refuse to consider seeing? If so, why? Titanic. Just because enough people already have seen it.
12) Favorite filmmaker collaboration: Paul Thomas Anderson and Jonny Greenwood.
13) Most recently viewed movie on DVD/Blu-ray/theatrical? "The Sting." I still love it.
14) Favorite line of dialogue from a horror movie: Hate horror movies.
15) Second favorite Oliver Stone film: Nixon. I like JFK the best. He makes good presidential films.
16) Eva Mendes or Raquel Welch? I have no preference here.
17) Favorite religious satire: "Monty Python's The Life of Brian"
18) Best Internet movie argument? (question contributed by Tom Block): Huh?
19) Most pointless Internet movie argument? (question contributed by Tom Block): Most of them.
20) Charles McGraw or Robert Ryan? I guess Robert Ryan because I have a faint notion of who he is.
21) Favorite line of dialogue from a western: "Hyah!"
22) Second favorite Roy Del Ruth film: Um, who?
23) Relatively unknown film or filmmaker you’d most eagerly proselytize for: He's not anything close to unknown, but I really think Michael Winterbottom is underrated.
24) Ewan McGregor or Gerard Butler? This question is so silly. Ewan is only the most beautiful, wonderful actor on the planet, and Butler is… not.
25) Is there such a thing as a perfect movie? No.
26) Favorite movie location you’ve most recently had the occasion to actually visit: Los Angeles.
27) Second favorite Delmer Daves film: Again, who?
28) Name the one DVD commentary you wish you could hear that, for whatever reason, doesn't actually exist: Jack Nance, "Eraserhead."
29) Gloria Grahame or Marie Windsor? Once again, have a faint idea of what Grahame looks like, so she wins.
30) Name a filmmaker who never really lived up to the potential suggested by their early acclaim or success: Franc Roddam. I loved "Quadrophenia" at the time.
31) Is there a movie-based disagreement serious enough that it might cause you to reevaluate the basis of a romantic relationship or a friendship? No, or it would have already happened.


Sean Axmaker said...

1) The classic movie moment everyone loves except me is:
Hey, what's not to like?

2) Favorite line of dialogue from a film noir
"Va-va-va-voom! Boom! Pow"

Just kidding. I'll cheat a little and use a brief dialogue exchange:
"Next time you wake up, Bart, look over at me lying there beside you. I'm yours and I'm real."
"Yes, but you're the only thing that is, Laurie. The rest is a nightmare."

3) Second favorite Hal Ashby film
"The Last Detail"

4) Describe the moment when you first realized movies were directed as opposed to simply pieced together anonymously. *
I really cannot recall the a-ha moment. I must have snuck up on me somewhere between a late-night TV showing of "Bride of Frankenstein" and seeing "Excalibur" in the theater.

5) Favorite film book
"The Parade's Gone By," Kevin Brownlow. I was going to go with "The Phantom Empire" by Geoffrey O'Brien (which I've handed out as a present many times), but Brownlow's book had a bigger effect on my than any film book before or since, and I still return to it for its information, its passion for its subject, and way all those voices combine to offer an evocation of an era.

6) Diana Sands or Vonetta McGee
Vonetta McGee

7) Most egregious gap in your viewing of films made in the past 10 years
Sadly, more gaps than I care to remember. The most glaring I guess is Bela Tarr: I've seen only two of his films, and only one from the last decade. And both of them, mind you, were amazing.

8) Favorite line of dialogue from a comedy

"Puht-in onna Ri-i-i-i-i-itz!" (It's all in the delivery)

9) Second favorite Lloyd Bacon film
"42nd Street"

10) Richard Burton or Roger Livesey
Roger Livesey, hands down. He's just better company. Plus he knows where he's going.

11) Is there a movie you staunchly refuse to consider seeing? If so, why?
I think I've survived just fine all this time without seeing "Salo" so that's a film I think is best left that way.

12) Favorite filmmaker collaboration
Director Chuck Jones, writer Michael Maltese, voice actor Mel Black. Screwball surrealism meets vaudeville existentialism in on 7-minute cartoon after another.

13) Most recently viewed movie on DVD/Blu-ray/theatrical?
Watched "Heaven With a Barbed Wire Fence" on DVD from the 20th Century Fox Cinema archives last night. But if you include streaming, I just signed up for a free Hulu Plus trial and saw "The Murderer Lives at Number 21" via Roku.

14) Favorite line of dialogue from a horror movie
"You can't kill the bogeyman." Halloween

15) Second favorite Oliver Stone film
"Platoon"

16) Eva Mendes or Raquel Welch
Eva Mendes - worked with Werner Herzog and Leos Carax. End of argument.

Sean Axmaker said...

Part 2:

17) Favorite religious satire
I don't think I can come up with anything better than "Life of Brian"

18) Best Internet movie argument? (question contributed by Tom Block)
There probably are some, but I can't think of one off the top of my head.

19) Most pointless Internet movie argument?
Whether "Zero Dark Thirty" defends the American use of torture in the years after the September 11 attacks. Seriously?

20) Charles McGraw or Robert Ryan
Robert Ryan is the correct pick every time, no matter what the choice.

21) Favorite line of dialogue from a western
"A man needs a reason to ride this country. You got a reason?"

22) Second favorite Roy Del Ruth film
"Blessed Event"

23) Relatively unknown Film or filmmaker you’d most eagerly proselytize for:
I've been thinking back to Canadian film I saw a decade ago at a film festival. It's called "Punch," written and directed by Guy Bennett. Came out on DVD years ago and disappeared, but really deserves a serious look. Smart, provocative, and it acknowledges something that movies by their nature seem of overlook: that when one person punches another person without provocation, it's not something easily shrugged off. It's a transgressive act, an assault, and it can be humiliating and emotionally painful for the victim. I've never seen another film express that transgression in such intimate and emotional terms.

24) Ewan McGregor or Gerard Butler
Ewan McGregor. I'd much rather have a pint with Ewan, or have a pint while watching one of his films.

25) Is there such a thing as a perfect movie?
There must be. There's no other explanation for "Sunrise."

26) Favorite movie location you’ve most recently had the occasion to actually visit *
A couple of years ago, I visited the Old Tucson Studio, now transformed into a kind of old west / western movies & TV theme park. And there walked the dry gulch where John Wayne made the prisoner exchange for Dean Martin in "Rio Bravo."

27) Second favorite Delmer Daves film
I should know his films better. Never did see "The Hanging Tree" or "The Badlanders." I may have to go with "Dark Passage" on this one, though my 25-year-old memory wants me to put "Cowboy" in this spot.

28) Name the one DVD commentary you wish you could hear that, for whatever reason, doesn't actually exist
Director Phil Tucker on "Robot Monster." I really, really want to know what he thought he was making.

29) Gloria Grahame or Marie Windsor
Gloria Grahame. Because duh, GLORIA GRAHAME!

30) Name a filmmaker who never really lived up to the potential suggested by their early acclaim or success
I really thought that Clark Johnson had a major career in front of him. Only a couple of features to his name, and of those the TV movie "Boycott" (2001) is terrific and the theatrical feature "S.W.A.T." is awfully well directed for such an insubstantial film (the best stuff is unscripted byplay between Sam Jackson and Colin Farrell). But he directed the pilots and early episodes of both "The Shield" and "The Wire" and was integral to setting the style and sensibility of those shows. Since then, I haven't seen him really extend himself. He's got a solid career directing television, and he does it well, but he should be directing features or developing shows himself. He just seems to be marking time on other people's projects.

31) Is there a movie-based disagreement serious enough that it might cause you to reevaluate the basis of a romantic relationship or a friendship? *
In my twenties, maybe, but not anymore.

W.B. Kelso said...

Always late but never delinquent.
Here are my answers for the latest quiz.

le0pard13 said...

Another fun movie quiz, Dennis. You can find my answers over here. Thanks.

le0pard13 said...

@ Anne Thompson:

"13) Most recently viewed movie on DVD/Blu-ray/theatrical?
Sam Raimi's "Oz the Great and Powerful" at El Capitan on Hollywood Boulevard, complete with organ player.
"

Same place where my family and I did for this (Thursday, March 7th premiere).

Dennis Cozzalio said...

And here's Brian Doan over at Bubblegum Aesthetics!

I'd better get on my list tonight before all the good answers are taken.

Dennis Cozzalio said...

Brian, you really went for broke on your answers-- I love the detail and the observations you put forth. I got through the story about Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom and realized that I was going to have to print this out and savor it later,. That's the mark of a really great SLIFR quiz response. Thanks so much! And everybody, if you haven't yet, get on over to Bubblegum Aesthetics and print one out for yourself.

Dennis Cozzalio said...

And speaking of intrigue, Sean, your description of Guy Bennett's Punch has me scrambling to find that one. It sounds like a fascinating movie. Congratulations. You're proselytizing worked like magic!

Sean Gilman said...

My answers over here

woodyfanon said...

my answers are over here at:
http://shehangbrightly.blogspot.ca/

Ivan said...

Hey Boss! I've taken the quiz, and my answers can be found right here, at LERNER INTERNATIONAL! Everyone, please come and visit! Thanks, Ivan

le0pard13 said...

Care of my colleague Kevin (aka Jack Deth) who posted this as a comment on my blog :

1/: ‘Thelma & Louise’. Never liked the joint suicide pact at the film’s end. Gravity always wins.

2/: ‘The Last Seduction’. “Anyone check you for a heartbeat recently?”

3/: ‘Shampoo’. With ‘The Last Detail’ at #1.

4/: The long tracking shot in Kubrick’s ‘Paths of Glory’.

5/: “The Psychotonic Encyclopedia’. Superb reference text for many or any genre of film.

6/: Vonetta McGee.

7/: Losing faith in Spielberg. Lost fait with Lucas.

8/: “Gentlemen! You can’t fight here. This is The War Room!” ‘Dr. Strangelove’.

10/: Richard Burton.

11/: ‘Schindler’s List’ and ‘E.T’. Already seen ‘Shoah’ and ‘The Wannsee Conference’.

I’ve never been a fan of cute, friendly aliens or monsters.

16/: Racquel Welch.

20/: Robert Ryan.

23/: Excellent choice with ‘Hickey & Boggs’.

I always go to bat for ‘The Big Combo’ by John H. Lewis. And Stephen Frears ‘The Grifters’. Both could do with a full blown Blu-Ray treatment with commentary, discussions of angles, shots and dialogue.

27/: ‘Destination Tokyo’. Yes, it’s an unabashed flag waver. But it still works!

28/: I’d love a full blown commentary on Alan J. Pakula’s ‘The Parallax View’. Still one of the best conspiracy films of the 1970s.

29/: Gloria Grahame.

30/: Definitely Shamaylan. Runner up would be De Palma.

31/: I’ve had arguments over Michael Powell’s ‘Peeping Tom’. But not to the point of wrecking a relationship.

Robert Fiore said...

On #4, I just realized my answer was wrong. The first director I was consciously aware of was Chuck Jones. Couldn't say when, but it must have been before I was 10. I always knew that Bugs Bunny cartoons were better than anything, and I knew the best Bugs Bunny cartoons were the ones that said Chuck Jones up front.

Weigard said...

1) The classic movie moment everyone loves except me is:

Probably “Nobody’s perfect” – just never found it all that amusing.

2) Favorite line of dialogue from a film noir

“The stuff that dreams are made of.” (Maltese Falcon) Now that’s how you end a movie.

3) Second favorite Hal Ashby film

Harold and Maude (my favorite is Being There).

4) Describe the moment when you first realized movies were directed as opposed to simply pieced together anonymously. *

I can’t remember a specific moment, but it would appear to have been much like what several others have mentioned, discovering the films of Alfred Hitchcock and finding so much in common between them, as well as ways of depicting a scene I’d never thought of.

5) Favorite film book

I’ve read very few. But of those, my favorite would be Sidney Lumet’s Making Movies.

6) Diana Sands or Vonetta McGee

Never seen either, unless it was in a TV guest spot.

7) Most egregious gap in your viewing of films made in the past 10 years

I don’t think I’ve seen a single Asian film in the last 10 years. I had seen several before then, back in the 80s and 90s. I don’t know how that happened. Oh, I did see The Host. Well, that’s probably representative, right?

8) Favorite line of dialogue from a comedy

“I don’t know – maybe it was Utah.” That’s right – settle it down to slight surrealistic sentimentality toward the end, then stick in one more laugh. Now that’s how you end a movie.

9) Second favorite Lloyd Bacon film

Other than 42nd Street (my favorite), the only other one I’ve seen is The Tramp.

10) Richard Burton or Roger Livesey

I’d take Richard Harris over either one.

11) Is there a movie you staunchly refuse to consider seeing? If so, why?

Maybe that one with the 9-minute rape scene – can’t remember the name, though. Which isn’t really going to help in the staunch refusal part.

12) Favorite filmmaker collaboration

Joel & Ethan Coen

13) Most recently viewed movie on DVD/Blu-ray/theatrical?

DVD: X2: X-Men United. I don’t know – I was rather bored. Everything seemed so by-the-numbers. I’d heard good things. Oh well.

Theater: Life of Pi. Absolutely wonderful. Only best picture nominee I’ve seen – would have been pleased if it had won.

14) Favorite line of dialogue from a horror movie

I’ve never been a very big fan of horror movies, so I’m going to fudge a little bit here – “Blücher!”

15) Second favorite Oliver Stone film

Platoon, second to JFK -- although if one adds in films where he’s a producer, Reversal of Fortune would be my favorite.

16) Eva Mendes or Raquel Welch

The only Raquel Welch movie I’ve seen is Legally Blonde? Oh dear. I’ll accept my F and move on.

Weigard said...

17) Favorite religious satire

I suppose it’s The Life of Brian -- that and Dogma are about the only ones I’ve really liked, though.

18) Best Internet movie argument?

I found the discussion on The Dark Knight over at Scanners to be really interesting and eye-opening.

19) Most pointless Internet movie argument?

Is Cinema dead?

20) Charles McGraw or Robert Ryan

The only performance of either that I’ve seen that caught my attention was in The Narrow Margin, so McGraw.

21) Favorite line of dialogue from a western

Also not a favorite genre, so here come da fudge:
The Stranger: “A wiser fella than m’self once said, sometimes you eat the bar and sometimes the bar, wal, he eats you.”
The Dude: “Uh-huh. That some kind of Eastern thing?”
The Stranger: “Far from it.”

22) Second favorite Roy Del Ruth film

Haven’t seen a one.

23) Relatively unknown Film or filmmaker you’d most eagerly proselytize for

I don’t think I know any that are even relatively unknown, but here are a couple with local connections that I think deserved more attention:

Clear Cut: The Story of Philomath, Oregon -- excellent documentary on a (formerly) small logging town that has increasingly become a suburb, and the conflict of cultures that resulted.

Bandits -- high profile actors, fun story, and I feel like I’m the only person who liked it

24) Ewan McGregor or Gerard Butler

Ewan McGregor, although that may have something to do with the material the two have had to work with. I remember watching Timeline, for which I had high hopes that were summarily dashed, and there was only one person who actually seemed to be “right” in the movie, and that was Gerard Butler. I’d like to see him in some more interesting films.

25) Is there such a thing as a perfect movie?

Well, people aren’t perfect, and most movies are about people. It would probably have to be about something entirely different. Robots, maybe. Like Wall-E. Except that had humans in it in the second half, and it kind of spoiled a great beginning. Animals are pretty perfect, though. Maybe Winged Migration -- birds being birds. Except they got humans to write the music, and to narrate it. Drop the score and the narration track and there you have a perfect movie!

26) Favorite movie location you’ve most recently had the occasion to actually visit *

I almost made it to Mackinac Island (Somewhere in Time, and of course Super 8) on a trip to Michigan, but time constraints squelched it.

27) Second favorite Delmer Daves film

Hey, I’ve actually seen two! Hollywood Canteen would come out second to An Affair to Remember.

28) Name the one DVD commentary you wish you could hear that, for whatever reason, doesn't actually exist

Orson Welles on Citizen Kane would be cool. I imagine he would need to do at least 3 separate audio tracks in order to get in everything he might want to say. It would probably create three new films, all very “Citizen Kane”-like.

29) Gloria Grahame or Marie Windsor

Windsor is wonderful in The Narrow Margin, but overall, I think I’d have to go for Grahame.

30) Name a filmmaker who never really lived up to the potential suggested by their early acclaim or success

I guess I’d have to go with M. Night Shyamalan.

31) Is there a movie-based disagreement serious enough that it might cause you to reevaluate the basis of a romantic relationship or a friendship? *

Gosh, no. I’ll take imperfect people over perfect movies any day.

Craig said...

My responses here.

Dennis Cozzalio said...

And here's one from a blog called Citizen Screenings.

Patrick said...

I couldn't persuade my good friend Jamie Lewis to post his answers - but I have no qualms about posting them without his knowing...

1) The classic movie moment everyone loves except me is:
Steve McQueen's fence jump at the end of the Great Escape. Almost every other character's escape attempt is un-done by cruel fate and misfortune, but Virgil Hilts' ridiculous showboating gets him gently escorted back to jail. He doesn't even nosedive into the barbed wire, but delicately drapes himself on a few carefully arranged strands that miraculously fail to rip the smug, pussy-chomping grin off his face. When he wimps out and flashes his stripes at the Nazis they don't even have the decency to machine-gun him for being such a tosser.

2) Favorite line of dialogue from a film noir

Porter: You got a light?
Val Resnick: No.
Porter: Then what good are you? (Shoots him)
(Payback - 1999)

3) Second favorite Hal Ashby film
Bound For Glory

4) Describe the moment when you first realized movies were directed as opposed to simply pieced together anonymously.
Around 1982, Close Encounters had its broadcast television debut. My older siblings were thrilled about it and spent the day teasing me because I wouldn't be allowed to stay up late enough to watch it. Long story short, I kicked up a sufficient fuss to be allowed to watch the first half hour or so and then had to go to bed. That first 30 minutes freaked me out so badly I thought I'd never sleep again. A few days later, during our weekly trip to the public library, I stumbled across a paperback biography of Spielberg that mentioned the movie on the front cover and had colour stills of all his movie. I foolishly thought the book might reveal the plot of the movie so I could memorize the details and bluff that I'd seen it amongst my schoolfriends. Instead, I ended up reading about Spielberg's childhood movies, his relationship with Lucas through the late 70s and realized there was this one guy who'd been behind all these movies I wasn't allowed to see.

5) Favorite film book
The Devil's Candy: The Anatomy of a Hollywood Fiasco - by Julie Salamon. I still wince every time I see or hear Morgan Freeman..

6) Diana Sands or Vonetta McGee
Vonetta McGee

7) Most egregious gap in your viewing of films made in the past 10 years
This Is England

Favorite line of dialogue from a comedy
No, that was "I like your ass. Can I wear it as a hat?"

9) Second favorite Lloyd Bacon film
Gold Diggers of 1937

10) Richard Burton or Roger Livesey
Burton. With one Taylor tied behind his back.

11) Is there a movie you staunchly refuse to consider seeing? If so, why?
The Black Swan. Because Darren Aronofsky and Natalie Portman. I have my limits.

12) Favorite filmmaker collaboration
John Carpenter and Kurt Russell

13) Most recently viewed movie on DVD/Blu-ray/theatrical?
Farenheit 9/11. Still stands up.

14) Favorite line of dialogue from a horror movie
"Groovy"

Patrick said...

Jamie Lewis responses, part two...

15) Second favorite Oliver Stone film
Talk Radio

16) Eva Mendes or Raquel Welch
Eva Mendes

17) Favorite religious satire
Name of the Rose

18) Best Internet movie argument? (question contributed by Tom Block)
Anything involving Michael Bay.

19) Most pointless Internet movie argument? (question contributed by Tom Block)
Anything involving Michael Bay.

20) Charles McGraw or Robert Ryan
Robert Ryan.

21) Favorite line of dialogue from a western
"I'm your huckleberry"

22) Second favorite Roy Del Ruth film
Gold Diggers of Broadway.

23) Relatively unknown Film or filmmaker you’d most eagerly proselytize for
Brian Helgeland.

24) Ewan McGregor or Gerard Butler
Ewan McGregor (Despite his many crimes)

25) Is there such a thing as a perfect movie?
No.

26) Favorite movie location you’ve most recently had the occasion to actually visit *
Hyde Park (it's on the Hudson)

27) Second favorite Delmer Daves film
The Petrified Forest.

28) Name the one DVD commentary you wish you could hear that, for whatever reason, doesn't actually exist
Birth of a Nation.

29) Gloria Grahame or Marie Windsor
Marie Windsor. Gloria Grahame always looked like she was in the first stages of anaphylaxis.

30) Name a filmmaker who never really lived up to the potential suggested by their early acclaim or success
Richard Kelly.

31) Is there a movie-based disagreement serious enough that it might cause you to reevaluate the basis of a romantic relationship or a friendship? *
A total disregard of Monty Python.

Steven Hart said...

1. "Plastics." The Graduate.

28. Gore Vidal's wonderfully gossipy and bitchy commentary track for "The Best Man," one of the best political movies ever made.

Steven Hart said...

14. "I don't know what it is, but it's weird and it's pissed off." The Thing, 1982.

Matthew David Wilder said...

1) The classic movie moment everyone loves except me is:

Tons, but let's say James Dean screaming "You're tearin' me apaaaaaht!" This relates to my assertion that Nicholas Ray is generally--not always, but largely--full of shit.

2)Favorite line of dialogue from a film noir

I can say that a beautiful noir-ish line that stuck out recently, and somehow nobody noticed, is Freddie Quell's kiss-off to Lancaster Dodd: "Maybe in another life."

3)Second favorite Hal Ashby film

SHAMPOO

4)Describe the moment when you first realized movies weredirected as opposed to simply pieced together anonymously. *

Kind of a two-part process, but it definitely escalated from NETWORK--particularly the four-TV-sets-talking-at-once opening and the gundown of Howard Beale, followed by the TV camera push-in and the canned applause, followed by the babbling TV's over the credits at the end...that was a shocker of real DIRECTED-NESS. Then, the next year, seeing Peckinpah's CROSS OF IRON. Very strange, beautiful film. Saw it with my dad who was, for some reason, a Peckinpah fan. I guess trying to like what my dad liked or see what he saw made me look into the Peckinpah-ness of the movie, and I found it terrifying and wonderful, the inside of this guy's mind. The body squashed like a pie plate by passing jeeps, just left there to stay squashed...things like this blew my mind.

5)Favorite film book

I have a sentimental attachment to Pauline Kael's WHEN THE LIGHTS GO DOWN. It was an Easter gift to me as a kid with a bunch of chocolate rabbits. I swirl the feel of biting into a hollow chocolate rabbit with reading that book (wags, mock all you will). Manny Farber's NEGATIVE SPACE is obviously a big deal, and for a more adult user.

6)Diana Sands or Vonetta McGee?

Vonetta McGee is the bomb, and hugely underrated.

7)Most egregious gap in your viewing of films made in the past 10 years

Last ten? I feel pretty kept up with the last ten. I think I am missing some Techines. I know I am missing some Ozons. There is probably some cool Bellocchio and Tavianis stuff we haven't seen.

8)Favorite line of dialogue from a comedy

"Did anybody evah tell you.... you're a MOE-RON?" -- Jerry Langford from THE KING OF COMEDY (which, yeah, I guess, isn't "a comedy")

9)Second favorite Lloyd Bacon film

I have a sad childhood attachment to THE GOOD HUMOR MAN.

10)Richard Burton or Roger Livesey?

Burton. No star was more daring than Burton in that string of incredibly weird allegedly bad movies he did from the late sixties well into the seventies. Imagine Brad Pitt jumping on board DOCTOR FAUSTUS, HAMMERSMITH IS OUT, and THE MEDUSA TOUCH. Or any of those Dick Movies.

11) Is there a movie you staunchly refuse to consider seeing? If so, why?

Only one. HAROLD AND MAUDE. I refuse to see HAROLD AND MAUDE and I refuse to read THE CATCHER IN THE RYE. I passed on this as a youth and I intend to keep it that way for obvious reasons.

12) Favorite filmmaker collaboration

John Williams and Spielberg in E.T. People forget how avant-garde this movie is. No movie so small was composed entirely in such a massive, whamming, Wagnerian way. The ratio of size-of-score to size-of-movie is unique in cinema--and it works. The movie is druglike, a dream. It is as if the images and music are flowing out of one mind.

13)Most recently viewed movie on DVD/Blu-ray/theatrical?

Theatrical: THROUGH A GLASS DARKLY. DVD: JENNIFER'S BODY.

14) Favorite line of dialogue from a horror movie

"You betta stand on yo haid an' hang by yo fumbs!" -- THE HILLS HAVE EYES

15)Second favorite Oliver Stone film

JFK

Matthew David Wilder said...

16) Eva Mendes or Raquel Welch?
Raquel.

Wow. Wa wa wee whoa. Listen to the MYRA BRECKENRIDGE commentary some time. This strange rich Latina Republican woman looks back on being Raquel Welch.

17) Favorite religious satire

There are so few. NASTY HABITS is a great movie but it is really a "Watergate satire." THE RULING CLASS is really a satire of the British ruling class. Bunuel's THE MILKY WAY is really a tender homage to Catholic errata, not an attack. I guess I'll go with SCORPIO RISING, which at least taints the Jesus story with gay porn and jukebox music.

18) Best Internet movie argument? (question contributed by Tom Block)

I am continually astonished by the way Glenn Kenny gets his blood pressure raised in his blog. Last week some dumb college girl posted a very obscure thing saying "I Think Jazz Sucks!" It was dumb. She was dumb. I don't think jazz musicians were in danger of being rounded up and put in boxcars. But Kenny expostulated and exploded. Even in his rave reviews he finds stuff to splutter and push and jab his fingers into its chest. I am afraid to ever meet him in the flesh.

19) Most pointless Internet movie argument? (question contributed by Tom Block)

See above.

20) Charles McGraw or Robert Ryan?

Ryan for sure. The man who greeted Michael Caine just as he arrived in the US at the Polo Lounge by cheekily pinching his arse.

21) Favorite line of dialogue from a western

"Goin' into my own home justified" in RIDE THE HIGH COUNTRY....

22) Second favorite Roy Del Ruth film

I gotta get to know Del Ruth better. Taped today's TCM Woody Van Dyke festival, how will I ever get to it! Anyway, I know one Del Ruth real well...ALWAYS LEAVE THEM LAUGHING. Scorsese's Guilty Pleasures description of LAUGHING is more hard-edged than the movie, but it is still fun, and still amazing to think Uncle Miltie, in all his broadness and hostility, had a super-huge, globally hyper-famous moment in the sun.

Matthew David Wilder said...

23) Relatively unknown film or filmmaker you’d most eagerly proselytize for

Lisandro Alonso's LIVERPOOL is by no means unknown but I think it is a major film that should be better recognized. To turn the clock back, I think Byron Haskin's I WALK ALONE is a hugely great movie, far better than a lot of better-known noirs that are frequently re-viewed and discussed.

24) Ewan McGregor or Gerard Butler?

Ewan in a walk.

25) Is there such a thing as a perfect movie?

Sure. Lots. Let's try to pull a few off the top of our head. SINGIN' IN THE RAIN. GOODFELLAS. THE GODFATHER, 1 &2. CARRIE. BOOGIE NIGHTS. Let's try to go a little farther afield. TIME OF THE WOLF. WIND FROM THE EAST. FOX AND HIS FRIENDS. How about a movie that's perfect that probably didn't even mean to be perfect: Warhol's BEAUTY #2?

26) Favorite movie location you’ve most recently had the occasion to actually visit *

I drank Aqua Velvas in the bar where Robert Downey drank them in ZODIAC. Sadly the place later burned to the ground.

27) Second favorite Delmer Daves film

BROKEN ARROW

28) Name the one DVD commentary you wish you could hear that, for whatever reason, doesn't actually exist *

I think about this shit stupidly a lot: there exist no Spielberg or Lynch commentaries, and I think that is a crime for posterity.

29) Gloria Grahame or Marie Windsor?

Marie! Get outta here with that Gloria Grahame nonsense!

30) Name a filmmaker who never really lived up to the potential suggested by their early acclaim or success

There are so many, it hurts to think about. Read Pauline Kael's late, post-retirement reminiscence of Peckinpah. It is one of my favorite essays, if you want to call it that, about filmmaking. A superfan, Kael is remarkably clear-eyed--terrifyingly so--about the man Peckinpah was. She described him as "the most unfulfilled of all great directors," and though that label might belong with Welles, she may be right. What's worse, a cult has grown around his garbled, poorly thought out and/or mutilated films.

31) Is there a movie-based disagreement serious enough that it might cause you to reevaluate the basis of a romantic relationship or a friendship? *

I lived with a girl with whom I suspected I had some really grave differences. I took out a CD and said, "If I die first, I want you to play this music at my funeral." I played it: "Cockeye's Theme" from ONCE UPON A TIME IN AMERICA. It's a long piece. She was lying on the couch. When it was over, she looked up at me and said, "Kinda....cheesy, isn't it?" In that moment I knew the relationship was over.

Beveridge D. Spenser said...

My super-late, no-excuses-except-my-laptop-ate-my-homework answers are on my Cool Bev blog http://coolbev.blogspot.com/2013/03/laptop-ate-my-homework.html

DB said...

1) Hated movie moment
Torture of burglars in Home Alone
       
2) Noir Dialogue
Pass - I'm better at remembering images than words
       
3)Ashby film
Bound for Glory

4) Director recognition.
I'm sure something having to do with Alfred Hitchcock
       
5) film book
Pauline Kael 1001 Nights at the Movies
       
6) Diana Sands or Vonetta McGee?
Diana Sands because I knew who she is
       
7) egregious gap
Have never seen an entire James Bond film, including any of the recent ones
       
8) comedy dialogue
"It's just a flesh wound!"
       
9)  Lloyd Bacon film
42nd Street
       
10) Burton/Livesey?
Burton
       
11) Movie I refuse to see
Atlas Shrugged - inspiration for bad people
       
12) collaboration
Satyajit Ray and cinematographer Subrata Mitra
       
13) Recently viewed
DVD: Farewell My Queen Theatrical: Stoker
       
14) Horror movie dialogue
"...They'll see and they'll know, and they'll say, "Why, she wouldn't even harm a fly..."
        
15) Oliver Stone film
Heaven and Earth

       
16) Mendes/Welch?
Mendes
       
17) Religious satire
Monty Python: The Life of Brian
  
18) Internet movie argument?
Pass: Bloggers I read are not very contentious
       
19) pointless Internet argument?
Pass
       
20) McGraw/Ryan?
Ryan         

21) Western dialogue
It ain't an easy thing, killing a man.
       
22) Roy Del Ruth
Blond Crazy
       
23) Relatively unknown filmmaker
Hiroshi Shimizu
       
24) McGregor/ Butler?
McGregor
       
25) perfect movie?
Shop around the Corner
       
26) movie location
Manhattan
  
27) Delmer Daves film
Love Affair
        
28) DVD commentary
William Shakespeare on Chimes at Midnight
       
29) Grahame/Windsor?
Grahame
       
30) Unfulfilled potential
Charles Laughton
       
31) movie-based disagreement?
Yes - but more based on political or ethical implications of the film and not purely as an art form

Susie Bright said...

So, sue me! I'm a month late, but I sure did enjoy myself:

http://susiebright.blogs.com/susie_brights_journal_/2013/04/miss-jean-brodies-movie-quiz-spring-fling.html

Thanks so much, Dennis.

Dennis Cozzalio said...

Hey, Susie, you still beat me! My answers are about 2/3 finished! I'm off to read your answers now!