Tuesday, April 04, 2006

EDWARD COPELAND's BEST OF THE BEST: Ten Instances When The Academy Got It Right

Although I did cast my vote, I must say I fell asleep at the wheel and missed a big opportunity to promote Edward Copeland’s recent poll on the Worst Best Picture Winners Ever. It was an opportunity for readers to cast their own top ten choices, complete with as much commentary as they cared to include, and Edward’s compiling of the results made me realize it was a project those who enjoy the quizzes from the professors here at SLIFR U would probably have enjoyed as well.

My apologies to Edward, a frequent visitor to this site (as I am to his), for not doing my part to promote his fascinating poll or participating in the comments column with further observations after it was published.

But all is not lost. Those who fancy a run at listing their top ten best choices for Best Picture by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences are directed toward Edward’s new contest. This time out, he’ll be ranking, from the 78 Best Picture winners, the best from 1 to 10, number 1 being the best of the Best. Edward will tally the results and post them by April 30 or May 1. And Edward adds this comment:

“Remember: Only complete, ranked lists will be counted. Also, I'd like more of you to include comments this time for when I assemble the announcement post.” (That last part was directed toward the likes of me, I’m afraid…)

So if you’re looking for a place not to vent this time, but to say, “Here, dear Academy, are ten instances when you really got it right,” then head on over to Edward Copeland on Film and pick your top 10 (he’s provided a handy list of all 78 winners right there on his site).

1 comment:

Sharon said...

Yea, another contest! I am diligently working on my top ten and will post it fairly soon, I think. In preparation, I printed a list of all 78 winners and was a little surprised to find that I've seen 51 of them! If I had had to guess, I would have said that I've only seen half. Most of the unseen movies are from Oscar’s early days, because I've seen every Oscar winner since Kramer vs. Kramer took home the little gold man in 1979. But thanks to the good folks at Netflix I can try to make a dent in the remaining 27 over the next few months. Frankly, there are some that I don't care if I ever see (I'm talking to you, Annie Hall), but many others that I do feel compelled to see.